watermark

3.7 Theme 5: Brisbane's CityShape

3.7.1 Strategic outcomes

(1) The strategic outcomes for the CityShape theme are:
(a) The CityShape theme states the outcomes for Brisbane's urban form and structure that integrates in a spatial context the four themes that underpin Brisbane's emergence as a new world city; namely its globally competitive economy, outstanding lifestyle, clean and green leading environmental performance and highly effective transport and infrastructure networks. Brisbane's urban form and structure is spatially represented on the following strategic framework maps:
(i) SFM-001 Sub-regional Context Strategic Framework Map;
(ii) SFM-002 Brisbane CityShape 2031 Land Use Strategic Framework Map;
(iii) SFM-003 Brisbane Selected Transport Corridors and Growth Nodes Strategic Framework Map;
(iv) SFM-004 Brisbane Greenspace Strategic Framework Map;
(v) SFM-005 Brisbane Transport Strategic Framework Map.
(b) Brisbane's City Centre is a larger and more powerful economic engine for growth of the city which:
(i) accommodates a wide range of commercial, government, retail, employment, residential, entertainment, services, recreation, community and cultural facilities, provided in a high-quality urban environment which also offers highly urban lifestyle opportunities;
(ii) is a focal point for Brisbane's outstanding lifestyle that offers an urban metropolitan way of life based on its memorable precincts and their relationship to the Brisbane River, the 24-hour economy, access to major community, cultural and education facilities, significant places of cultural heritage and world-class recreation; all of which is enjoyed in an easily accessible, high-quality pedestrian environment;
(iii) comprises three corridor hubs at the edges of the City Centre (Fortitude Valley, Woolloongabba and Milton) that act as gateways to the Selected Transport Corridors upon which its Growth Nodes are based. This ensures seamless transition points and connections between these different parts of the city (shown below in Figure b).
(iv) the City Centre and three corridor hubs sit within the Inner City area that is comprised of selected transport corridors and growth nodes, Suburban Living Areas, Special Centres, transport infrastructure and urban open spaces. This Inner City area is the highest concentration of employment, cultural facilities and residential development in the City.

View Image

(c) Brisbane's Major Industry Areas are significant employment generators for the city and Queensland which:
(i) accommodate a significant amount of economic activity generating employment;
(ii) comprise low, medium and high impact industrial-based economic development that is always evolving with Brisbane's changing economy;
(iii) are protected and are able to evolve to support Brisbane's industrial economy, global business and innovative start-ups;
(iv) are serviced by small-scale commercial uses that support workers and provide business services;
(v) do not provide opportunities for non-industrial based land uses that are otherwise adequately provided for elsewhere in the city or other parts of the region other than critical infrastructure;
(vi) are serviced by major transport infrastructure which provides for:
(A) more sustainable travel modes such as public transport, walking and cycling;
(B) efficient freight, air and sea transport within the city and to key freight access points and routes to and from the city (shown below in Figure C).
(d) Brisbane's Strategic Inner City Industrial Areas are located amongst high growth mixed use areas and perform an important function in servicing the needs of surrounding residents and businesses. Strategic Inner City Industrial Areas:
(i) accommodate economic activity generating employment;
(ii) comprise industrial based economic development, in particular service trades, automobile servicing, couriers and self storage;
(iii) are protected and able to evolve to support Brisbane's industrial economy, global business and innovative start-ups;
(iv) are serviced by ancillary commercial uses that support workers and provide essential business services;
(v) do not provide opportunities for non-industrial based land uses that are otherwise adequately provided for elsewhere in the city or other parts of the region or a comprehensive neighbourhood planning approach has occurred that provides ongoing land use and infrastructure outcomes.

View Image

(e) Brisbane's Major Centres are the principal regional activity centres and major regional activity centres under the SEQ Regional Plan 2009-2031 which:
(i) are vibrant, mixed-use destinations that support an 18-hour economy;
(ii) encourage and accommodate economic activity, distinguished by different scales of built form and urban design appropriate to the local context, as detailed in neighbourhood plans;
(iii) accommodate high levels of employment outside the City Centre and Major Industry Areas;
(iv) are highly accessible elements in the city's public and active transport network and serve as key transport interchanges in their area (shown below in Figure d);
(v) integrate residential development;
(vi) provide focal points for access to and provision of cultural, education, health and community services and urban commons;
(vii) have their own distinctive urban form, sense of place and functions, tailored to the locality and community needs.

View Image

(f) Brisbane's Special Centres are centres or clusters characterised by a dominant purpose, use or activity that is not residential which:
(i) require specific consideration apart from general centre types in order to enhance the benefit these centres can bring to the city;
(ii) generate infrastructure requirements and impacts generally like other centres, however the nature of the dominant purpose, use or activity can alter this.
(g) Brisbane's Suburban Living Areas represent the majority of established residential suburbs in Brisbane, where growth occurs in response to local needs and impacts on local amenity and values are carefully considered. Brisbane's Suburban Living Areas comprise the following:
(i) low density residential areas where the majority of development is housing in the form of detached dwellings ranging from small cottages to large family homes on lots typically in the range of 400–800m2;
(ii) centres, community facilities, medium and high density residential and industrial uses, as indicated in neighbourhood plans and the zoning pattern.
(iii) localities identified in overlays, neighbourhood plans and the zoning patterns as having a particular character or value that is desired to be retained with very little visible change over the life of the planning scheme;
(iv) areas of character housing and commercial character buildings substantially constructed in 1946 or earlier;
(v) areas of small-scale low-medium density housing such as dual occupancy or row housing that encourage intergenerational housing options to facilitate ageing in place;
(vi) a range of non-residential land uses that generally support the needs of the surrounding residential area.
(h) Brisbane's Greenspace and Rural Neighbourhoods which are located outside and on edges of the urban footprint in the SEQ Regional Plan and the Priority infrastructure area at the periphery of the city, including the Moreton Bay islands:
(i) are very low-density areas that generally comprise single houses on large lots;
(ii) are not provided with the same level of service as urban locations with regard to the delivery of physical infrastructure, particularly connection to the sewer network, public transport, roads and refuse collection;
(iii) are developed for rural industries including horticulture, intensive animal industry, livestock grazing and cropping in Rural Neighbourhoods;
(iv) maintain Brisbane's ecological assets and provide some of its park and recreation needs.
(i) Brisbane's Greenspace (refer to Brisbane greenspace system strategic framework map) offers a well-connected system of places with environmental, recreational and rural values in a variety of land use settings which:
(i) comprises the majority of the city's land outside the urban footprint in the SEQ Regional Plan and land within the urban footprint located in a series of district and metropolitan parks, waterway networks, sport and recreation areas and lands supporting citywide biodiversity areas or scenic amenity values;
(ii) frames and weaves through the city, including the green hills of Brisbane Forest Park and Mt Coot-tha, the leafy suburbs and waterways, along the Brisbane River to Moreton Bay and the Moreton Bay islands;
(iii) maintains Brisbane's ecological assets and provides for many of its park and recreation needs;
(iv) serves many functions which are described in the clean and green leading environmental performance theme.
(j) Brisbane's Future Suburban Living Areas comprise the remaining large-scale greenfield development areas on the outskirts of the urban part of the city which are to be developed for new communities that:
(i) ensure appropriate yield and land use interrelationships are achieved even if less than the greenfield dwelling targets for the city in the SEQ Regional Plan;
(ii) are healthy, vibrant, inclusive, accessible, support walking and cycling and foster a strong sense of community;
(iii) exhibit a strong sense of place and demonstrate leading-practice urban design outcomes, including building upon the landscape features of the locality and providing a high degree of legibility and permeability;
(iv) demonstrate leadership in sustainable outcomes, protect and enhance environmental assets, incorporate water sensitive urban design and exhibit leading-practice integrated water management;
(v) reflect the specific land use, environmental, infrastructure, social and economic contexts of each location and any relevant neighbourhood plan.
(k) Brisbane's Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors provide for growth in dwellings and jobs to be concentrated in identified nodes along Selected Transport Corridors to ensure access to employment, services and infrastructure whilst maintaining the leafy suburban character of Brisbane's Suburban Living Areas. The future Growth Nodes are to be preserved as future opportunities for achieving the infill requirements of the SEQ Regional Plan and employment growth until the following are satisfied:
(i) a neighbourhood plan has been prepared by the Council which is to:
(A) determine the extent of land included in each node and the preferred mix of land uses, densities, character and elements that comprise each node;
(B) provide for a range of higher density housing forms and clusters of activity around hospitals, universities and other Special Centres that have easy access to public transport along Brisbane's transport corridors;
(C) articulate that the centres closest to the City Centre and Major Centres generally support the highest densities and most diverse range of land uses whilst the centres along the Selected Transport Corridors in outer locations are hubs for their surrounding suburbs and provide a range of shops, employment opportunities and community facilities; or
(ii) a comprehensive planning process is completed which involves a local area and precinct approach, community consultation and consideration of the planning matters consistent with the scope of a neighbourhood plan prepared by the Council.
(l) Brisbane's development is strongly aligned with the provision of infrastructure to service that development to enable the best value and efficiency to be gained from the land use and the infrastructure planned for in the Local government infrastructure plan and an infrastructure corridor plan in an overlay.
(2) The strategic outcomes for Brisbane's CityShape comprise the following elements:
(a) Element 5.1 Brisbane's City Centre;
(b) Element 5.2 Brisbane's Major Industry Areas;
(c) Element 5.3 Brisbane's Major Centres;
(d) Element 5.4 Brisbane's Special Centres;
(e) Element 5.5 Brisbane's Suburban Living Areas;
(f) Element 5.6 Brisbane's Greenspace System comprising Greenspace and Rural Neighbourhoods;
(g) Element 5.7 Brisbane's Future Suburban Living Areas;
(h) Element 5.8 Brisbane's Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors;
(i) Element 5.9 Brisbane's Strategic Inner City Industrial Areas.
(3) Land identified on the Brisbane CityShape 2031 Land Use Strategic Framework maps, as Investigation Area may be suitable for inclusion in one or more of the CityShape elements, and is to be protected from development and subject to detailed investigations by the Council until decisions about long-term land use are made by the Council through an amendment to the planning scheme.
(4) Development which does not comply with the zone, zone precinct, neighbourhood plan or the Local government infrastructure plan must be consistent with the Strategic framework.

Note—Demonstrating consistency with the Strategic framework involves undertaking processes and assessments identified in the Social and health impact planning scheme policy and the Consultation planning scheme policy.

3.7.2 Element 5.1 – Brisbane's City Centre

Table 3.7.2.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
The City Centre largely comprises a number of unique precincts that collectively provide concentrations of commercial, retail, government, services, entertainment, cultural, health and education activities within a high-quality, easily accessible environment.
L1
The City Centre comprises the City peninsula and extends to Fortitude Valley, Milton and South Brisbane providing ample opportunities to accommodate future demand for prime office space in a variety of City Centre locations.
SO2
The City Centre's capital city function is promoted and protected.
L2
The City peninsula is the most prominent location within the City Centre whilst the other City Centre precincts such as Fortitude Valley, Milton and South Brisbane offer local diversity, connected by high-frequency public transport and high-quality pedestrian environments.
SO3
The City Centre provides the city's highest employment densities to accommodate the projected employment growth.
L3
Development involving high-density employment is prioritised into the City peninsula.
SO4
The City Centre comprises integrated residential and short-term accommodation.
L4
Development for mixed use, residential and short-term accommodation in the City Centre accords with the relevant neighbourhood plan.
SO5
The City Centre's subtropical civic places, parks and heritage places of local and state-wide significance are important for the city's identity and to service the needs of workers, visitors and residents of the City Centre and the wider city and regional population.
L5.1
Roma Street Parklands, the City Botanic Gardens, South Bank Parklands and smaller open spaces serve the recreational needs of residents, workers and visitors.
L5.2
Additional opportunities for significant public spaces and community facilities will be delivered to support the intensity of employment and residential development and provide a level of amenity and attractiveness that encourages people to live and work in the area.
L5.3
Development extends the public domain where a neighbourhood plan and other development requirements set this outcome.
L5.4
Development in the City Centre respects heritage buildings and places of cultural significance and reinforces the river identity.
SO6
The City Centre supports a 24-hour economy.
L6
The City Centre is to have entertainment and recreation precincts that facilitate these activities outside of normal business hours such that the amenity expectations of sensitive uses are less compared with typical circumstances elsewhere in the city.
SO7
The City Centre is supported by corridor hubs on the edges of the City Centre that are developed for additional commercial space and high-density residential as well as major health, education, knowledge and creative industry and entertainment facilities.
L7
Milton, Fortitude Valley and Woolloongabba are corridor hubs, these being points of transition between the City Centre and the transport corridors that extend into the balance of the city.
SO8
The City Centre is serviced by an improving public transport network which is supported by development.
L8.1
Development supports the multimodal transport hubs and interchanges on the frame of the City Centre, including at Milton, Woolloongabba and Bowen Hills, which would be supported by the Cross River Rail project in Connecting SEQ 2031.
L8.2
Development supports the construction of an inner-city subway and the implementation of the Cross River Rail project in Connecting SEQ 2031, to link key areas of the City Centre and provide additional river crossing and stations.
L8.3
Development supports construction of additional ferry terminals and further upgrades to the CityCat fleet.
SO9
The City Centre prioritises active transport and the activation of public spaces.
L9.1
Development provides for street improvements including:
(a) improved footpaths;
(b) increased shade and shelter;
(c) extension of pedestrian-only access on laneways and streets.
L9.2
Development provides urban commons and cross block links to improve pedestrian flow, and provide space for recreational and passive uses.
L9.3
Development extends the cycle network and invests in end-of-trip facilities to promote the take up of active transport.
L9.4
Development supports the continued deployment of a bike hire scheme in the city to provide an active transport alternative for transiting the City Centre.
SO10
The City Centre is serviced by an improved telecommunications network which is supported by development.
L10.1
Development supports a competitive high- speed fibre optic network for the City Centre.
L10.2
Development actively promotes telecommuting, tele-meetings and local tele-work centres.
L10.3
Development incorporates smart grid technology in the design of buildings.
L10.4
Development installs conduit in all major works projects to accommodate the provision of optic fibre cable.
SO11
The development potential of airspace in the City Centre is optimised by development.
L11.1
Development optimises the potential of airspace in the City Centre.
L11.2
Development does not compromise airport operations as outlined in the Airport environs overlay.

3.7.3 Element 5.2 – Brisbane's Major Industry Areas

Table 3.7.3.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
Australia TradeCoast
SO1
The Australia TradeCoast is serviced by improved road and freight transport networks which are supported by development.
L1.1
Development supports the upgrade of Kingsford Smith Drive to six lanes.
L1.2
Development supports improved connections between the Australia TradeCoast and the south-west industrial gateway to facilitate movement of freight and workers.
SO2
The Australia TradeCoast is serviced by expanded public and active transport networks which are supported by development.
L2.1
Development supports opportunities for the improved use of the existing rail network (Cleveland line, Airtrain corridor and disused portion of Pinkenba line) to provide access for workers to the Australia TradeCoast.
L2.2
Development encourages commuters to the Australia TradeCoast to use public transport.
L2.3
Development supports a rail and bus interchange at Skygate to further enable the area’s operation as a commercial precinct.
L2.4
Development supports increasing affordable public transport options to and from the airport, including potential for a fast 24-hour service connecting the airport to the City Centre.
L2.5
Development supports dedicated bus priority services to the region from key trip generator areas, including linking with workers in the south-western suburbs.
SO3
The Brisbane Airport and Port of Brisbane is a key centre in the city and provides major air access to and from the city for passengers and freight.
L3.1
Development enhances the function of the Brisbane Airport's role as a key centre, with a variety of uses complementary to the airport's passenger, freight, logistics and aerospace industry focus taking advantage of the transport network accessibility of the location without compromising the primary purpose of the safe and efficient function and operation of the airport and aircraft.
L3.2
Development enhances the function of the Port of Brisbane's role as a key centre for freight, logistics and industry. Development enhances this function with complementary and ancillary uses that do not compromise the primary purpose of the safe and efficient function and operation of the Port, shipping and transport.
SO4
The Australia TradeCoast is serviced by improved energy infrastructure networks which are supported by development.
L4.1
Development collaborates with energy utilities to ensure appropriate investment in energy infrastructure to support the forecast increase in energy-intensive heavy manufacturing. The Australia Trade Coast Strategic Infrastructure Plan has identified the need for a 275kV transmission line in the next 10–20 years.
L4.2
Development promotes the use of natural gas (southern Australia TradeCoast is adjacent to the Roma Brisbane gas pipeline) and renewable energy and installs smart-grid technologies to enhance energy demand management.
SO5
The Australia TradeCoast has a coordinated approach to water supply.
L5.1
Development supports water infrastructure investment.
L5.2
Development promotes efficient water use, including greater use of water sensitive urban design and demand management.
L5.3
Development supports a potential project to transport recycled water via a pipeline from Luggage Point to Australia TradeCoast Central.
L5.4
Development supports targeted opportunities for stormwater harvesting.
SO6
Operations in the Australia TradeCoast are flood tolerant.
L6.1
Development provides for flood immunity and mitigation in the Australia TradeCoast.
L6.2
Development supports a coordinated approach to filling land across the Australia TradeCoast.
SO7
The Australia TradeCoast is serviced by a fibre optic cable network which is supported by development.
L7.1
Development supports the deployment of high-speed fibre optic cable networks.
L7.2
Development ensures works projects in the Australia TradeCoast include conduit suitable for fibre optic cable networks.
SO8
The Australia TradeCoast's open space and community facilities networks are enhanced by development.
L8.1
Development buffers residential areas from roadways and industrial areas.
L8.2
Development improves links between education and training institutions (e.g. TAFE/SkillsTech in Eagle Farm) and industry (manufacturing, aviation, logistics) within the Australia TradeCoast.
L8.3
Development makes provision for appropriate community facilities to cater for an increasing workforce in the Australia TradeCoast, including health, education, child care and recreation facilities.
L8.4
Development makes provision for improved use of the Brisbane River and bay for recreational and tourism purposes such as the investigation of the feasibility of a river-based integrated ferry terminal to service Moreton Bay.
Northern industrial area (extending from Northgate to Zillmere)
SO9
Development supports the viability and efficient functioning of the Northern industrial area.
L9
The Northern industrial area:
(a) is located on Brisbane’s north-eastern railway line and adjacent to the Gateway Motorway;
(b) is primarily focused on manufacturing, transport and wholesale trade but is increasingly focused on low-impact industry and business services given its central location in Brisbane’s northern suburbs, proximity to the Australia TradeCoast and accessibility by public transport;
(c) is served by Geebung as its primary service centre.
South-west industrial gateway
SO10
The south-west industrial gateway is serviced by improved road and freight transport networks which are supported by development.
L10.1
Development supports improved links between the Ipswich Motorway and the Port of Brisbane to facilitate freight movement and movement of workers to and from the south-west industrial gateway and the Australia TradeCoast.
L10.2
Development supports the expanded use of service roads along the Ipswich Motorway to reduce congestion, removing local traffic from the motorway.
SO11
The south-west industrial gateway is serviced by expanded public and active transport networks which are supported by development.
L11.1
Development supports the provision of major rail and bus interchanges incorporating active transport end-of-trip facilities, to support use of active and public transport options in the south-west industrial gateway (including around Richlands).
L11.2
Development supports public transport services to cater for shift workers, particularly in high-growth areas such as Springfield.
L11.3
Development supports the incorporation of bikeways into other infrastructure projects to link with existing networks.
SO12
Archerfield Airport's long-term role is enhanced by development.
L12
Development enhances the functioning of Archerfield Airport.
SO13
The south-west industrial gateway is serviced by an improved energy infrastructure network which is supported by development.
L13.1
Development supports appropriate investment in energy infrastructure to support the forecast increase in energy-intensive heavy manufacturing.
L13.2
Development promotes the use of natural gas and renewable energy sources in manufacturing production.
SO14
The south-west industrial gateway is serviced by an improved water infrastructure network which is supported by development.
L14.1
Development supports the appropriate implementation of investment in water infrastructure, including stormwater mitigation.
L14.2
Development promotes efficient water use, including greater use of water-sensitive design and demand management.
L14.3
Development supports stormwater harvesting and storage to service industrial needs.
SO15
Operations within the south-west industrial gateway are flood tolerant.
L15
Development takes account of the potential for flooding and opportunities for flood mitigation.
SO16
The south-west industrial gateway is serviced by a fibre optic cable network which is supported by development.
L16.1
Development supports investment in the installation of high-speed fibre optic cable networks to facilitate the connectivity of the south-west industrial gateway to other areas of Brisbane, and the world.
L16.2
Development installs conduit to provide the right of way for fibre in areas as they develop to facilitate the rollout of a National Broadband Network.
SO17
The south-west industrial gateway's open space network is enhanced by development.
L17.1
Development provides for buffering of residential areas from roadways and industrial areas with open space.
L17.2
Development supports the provision of an open space network along Oxley Creek and Blunder Creek addressing natural, recreational and active transport options.
SO18
The south-west industrial gateway's community facilities network is enhanced by development.
L18.1
Development of high-noise recreation activities, such as trail bikes will be accommodated where appropriate.
L18.2
Development supports improved linkages between education and training institutions such as TAFE/SkillsTech and industry such as manufacturing, aviation and logistics within the south-west industrial gateway.
L18.3
Development makes provision for appropriate community facilities to support a growing workforce.

3.7.4 Element 5.3—Brisbane's Major Centres

Table 3.7.4.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
Major Centres accommodate significant population-serving activities and employment.
L1.1
Brisbane's Major Centres are located at:
(a) Chermside;
(b) Upper Mount Gravatt;
(c) Indooroopilly;
(d) Carindale;
(e) Toombul—Nundah;
(f) Mitchelton;
(g) Wynnum Central;
(h) Toowong.
L1.2
Development accords with the preferred mix of uses, densities and spatial arrangement for each Major Centre identified in the relevant neighbourhood plan.
L1.3
Development of the core areas of Major Centres is protected for intense economic activities through controls over the land use mix in mixed use precincts and design and adaptability of buildings.
SO2
Major Centres are well serviced by the city's public transport and active transport networks which are supported by development.
L2
Development supports the following key public transport networks in the Major Centres:
(a) Chermside is served by the extension of the Northern Busway and existing key bus interchanges;
(b) Upper Mount Gravatt is served by the South East Busway;
(c) Indooroopilly is served by the Ipswich railway line and a key bus interchange;
(d) Carindale will be supported by the extension of the Eastern Busway and the Gateway Motorway;
(e) Toombul—Nundah is served by northern railway lines, bus interchanges and proximity to the Brisbane Airport;
(f) Mitchelton is served by the Ferny Grove railway line;
(g) Wynnum Central is served by the Cleveland railway line and proximity to the Port of Brisbane;
(h) Toowong is served by the Ipswich railway line and a bus interchange.
SO3
Major Centres support an 18-hour economy.
L3
Some Major Centres are to have entertainment and recreation precincts that facilitate these activities outside normal business hours such that the amenity expectations for sensitive uses are less than in typical circumstances in other locations across the city.
SO4
Major Centres comprise integrated residential development.
L4
Higher density residential development is provided for and will complement, but not compromise, the core commercial, retail and community functions of the Major Centres.
SO5
Major Centres are key locations for community hubs, services and facilities.
L5.1
Development for cultural activities and community facilities is supported in the Major Centres.
L5.2
Council's community hubs are located in the Major Centres and integrated with other land uses.
SO6
Major Centres are part of a network of centres across the city where the key distinguishing characteristics of the centres is the physical scale, urban design and relationship to the surrounding land uses, not the type or function of business or other centre type activity being undertaken.
L6
Development of a Major Centre accords with the assessment benchmarks for each Major Centre stated in the zones, zone precincts, codes, neighbourhood plans, overlays and with the Local government infrastructure plan.

3.7.5 Element 5.4 – Brisbane's Special Centres

Table 3.7.5.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
Special Centres are characterised by a dominant use or activity that is reflected in the zone.
L1.1
Brisbane's Special Centres include:
(a) Queensland University of Technology;
(b) Southbank Institute of Technology;
(c) Mater and Mater Children's hospitals;
(d) Boggo Road Urban Village;
(e) Kelvin Grove Urban Village;
(f) Royal Brisbane Hospital;
(g) Princess Alexandra Hospital;
(h) University of Queensland;
(i) Enoggera Military Camp;
(j) Griffith University, Mount Gravatt Campus;
(k) Griffith University Innovation Park;
(l) Griffith University, Nathan Campus;
(m) Prince Charles Hospital;
(n) Brisbane Technology Park.
L1.2
The Specialised centre zone applies to:
(a) universities, other higher education campuses and research institutes;
(b) unique uses such as entertainment and conference centres and marinas;
(c) large-scale sales endeavours for fresh market produce or bulky goods;
(d) emerging industries;
(e) science and technology parks;
(f) large-format retail (the built form of the retailing, not the product).
L1.3
The Community facilities zone applies to major hospitals and their associated medical research institutes, where incorporated on site.
SO2
Special Centres enhance and contribute to their surrounding area.
L2.1
Special Centres integrate with surrounding areas, respect the amenity of nearby sensitive uses and are accessible and inclusive.
L2.2
Special Centres provide for the unique mix of activities in a concentrated or co-located manner and at a scale that optimises the functioning of uses.
SO3
Special Centres with a precinct which operates as a knowledge hub precinct builds on the city's tertiary education and research infrastructure.
L3.1
Development within and around Special Centres will strengthen the role of the area for knowledge-based activities (such as research and development in resources, health and education) and enhance the functioning of the precincts as major employment generators.
L3.2
Development in a knowledge hub precinct will support the core function of the precinct by either complementing existing activities, broadening the diversity and scope of services or providing accommodation for workers, students and visitors, as outlined in the Specialised centre development code.

3.7.6 Element 5.5 – Brisbane's Suburban Living Areas

Table 3.7.6.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
Suburban Living Areas experience growth in response to local context and needs including centres, community facilities, medium and high density residential and industrial uses.
L1
The zoning pattern shows the development intent that is consistent with local values, constraints and opportunities in the Suburban Living Areas.
SO2
Suburban Living Areas experience limited growth, providing predominantly detached housing for residents.
L2.1
Development for housing is restricted to detached housing and any on-site secondary dwelling in the majority of Suburban Living Areas.
L2.2
Development is restricted in terms of the lot sizes, configurations and circumstances suitable for subdivision and small-scale housing infill development.
SO3
Suburban Living Areas allow for adaptable small-scale multiple dwellings to provide for some intergenerational housing options catering to young people, families and supporting ageing in place.
L3
Development for small-scale multiple dwellings is restricted to well-located sites in Suburban Living Areas. Zone, neighbourhood plan and development codes, and mapping indicate various criteria for determining well-located sites in those localities and circumstances.
SO4
The local character which is typically defined by features such as consistent block size and house spacing, an established road pattern, a predominance of detached housing, the presence of mature vegetation and gardens and by local typography is maintained.
L4.1
Infill development is limited to instances where the resulting lot size reflects that which predominates in the neighbourhood.
L4.2
The siting, scale and lot coverage of new housing is consistent with the existing neighbourhood character of well-spaced houses and vegetated backyards.
L4.3
Development supports high levels of local amenity and air quality and enhances these areas, contributing to the sustainability of the city through:
(a) the retention of mature and significant vegetation;
(b) the retention of private open space capable of supporting trees and gardens;
(c) increasing local shade cover along streets;
(d) local sustainability initiatives such as water-sensitive urban design.
SO5
District centres serve local and district catchments and accommodate slightly higher densities than surrounding neighbourhoods.
L5.1
District centres are located at nodal points within residential neighbourhoods and function as community destinations, providing localised access to goods and services, including retail, community facilities and low impact industry and localised employment.
L5.2
District centres are the focus for the public transport network within the local catchment of the district centres.
SO6
Neighbourhood centres offer small-scale, low-impact local convenience services.
L6.1
Neighbourhood centres are interspersed within residential neighbourhoods and function as local neighbourhood service providers.
L6.2
Neighbourhood centres are of a scale which is consistent with surrounding detached housing.
L6.3
A new neighbourhood centre which is not in a location provided for in a zone, zone precinct, or neighbourhood plan is to:
(a) have a gross floor area of 2,500m2 or less and a maximum tenancy size of 2,000m2 or less;
(b) have a frontage predominantly to a major road;
(c) have vehicle site access from a suburban road, a district road or a neighbourhood road;
(d) be 400m or less walking distance from a dedicated public pedestrian access point of a public transport stop or station with a service frequency of 3 or more services per hour in peak periods;
(e) be more than 400m from an existing retail based centre;
(f) manage the impact on the amenity and character of adjacent uses and the locality consistent with the overall outcomes for the zone, zone precinct and neighbourhood plan for the surrounding uses and locality.
SO7
Non-residential uses support local character and amenity.
L7
A range of non-residential land uses that generally support the needs of those Suburban Living Areas include the following:
(a) local and district services and shopping with access to public transport services, as well as centres in specific locations and other small-scale non-residential uses such as those within commercial character buildings, providing neighbourhood convenience services within a walkable catchment;
(b) schools and other community facilities;
(c) a range of parks, from district sporting fields to local informal use parks;
(d) vegetation and open space, including in backyards, that support local and district ecological functions, including biodiversity and fauna movement, as well as helping reduce the urban heat island effect;
(e) pedestrian-friendly traffic environments and pedestrian and cyclist connectivity to surrounding areas including some buffered industrial areas that offer locally accessible employment opportunities for residents in the Suburban Living Areas.

3.7.7 Element 5.6 – Brisbane's Greenspace System

Table 3.7.7.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
The Greenspace System’s values and functions are identified, retained and enhanced.
L1.1
Development protects land allocated for nature conservation, public open space and sporting and recreation uses.
L1.2
Development intensity, land use allocation, siting and design protect the multiple values and functions of the Greenspace System.
L1.3
Development does not fragment high-value biodiversity areas, areas for large-scale rehabilitation, fauna movement and rural activities.
SO2
The Greenspace System is expanded to protect areas with green space values.
L2
Development in the Greenspace System appropriately reflects the values of the site and ensures those areas of the site are protected or enhanced.
SO3
The Greenspace System provides an effective network of green space links and contributes to a regional network.
L3.1
Development supports the linkage of Greenspace System areas with open space and recreational and biodiversity values.
L3.2
Development enhances the Greenspace System to enable green space areas to connect with communities, and integrate with regional green space in surrounding local government areas.
L3.3
Development protects the inter-urban breaks between Brisbane City and Moreton Bay Region, Somerset Region, Redland City and Logan City, as part of the Brisbane Greenspace System.
L3.4
Development is designed and managed to ensure Greenspace System areas provide physical breaks and buffers within the urban footprint.
L3.5
Corridors within the Greenspace System reinforce the sense of identity of local communities and assist in floodway and drainage functions and safe wildlife movement.
SO4
The Greenspace System protects koala habitats.
L4
Development protects koala habitat in biodiversity areas as mapped in the Biodiversity areas overlay.
SO5
The Greenspace System maintains and enhances the capacity of ecosystems to provide ecosystem services.
L5
Development identifies and protects areas with high levels of ecosystem services from development impacts.
SO6
Brisbane's existing extractive industry operations are managed to protect the Greenspace System.
L6
Existing extractive industry operations are managed to best-practice environmental standards to protect the values and functions of the Greenspace System.
Rural Neighbourhoods within the Greenspace System
SO7
Rural Neighbourhoods are a very low-density setting of houses in a rural-like or natural landscape.
L7
Development does not further fragment viable rural land.
SO8
Rural Neighbourhoods allow viable rural industries to operate within the context of rural activities, the Greenspace System rural living areas.
L8.1
Development is not adversely impacted by the edge impacts of rural production areas.
L8.2
Development protects rural residential amenity.
SO9
Rural Neighbourhoods protect biodiversity and landscape values and water quality.
L9
Development is residential in terms of building access, extent and siting and building design and landscaping is appropriately managed to protect biodiversity, landscape values and water quality.

3.7.8 Element 5.7 – Brisbane's Future Suburban Living Areas

Table 3.7.8.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
Future Suburban Living Areas are well planned accounting for land use, environment and infrastructure; and the social and economic characteristics, issues and interrelationships of each Future Suburban Living Area.
L1.1
(a) Rochedale;
(b) Lower Oxley Creek excluding Paradise Wetlands.
L1.2
Development configuration and scale and the appropriate mix of uses in a Future Suburban Living Area are to accord with the relevant neighbourhood plan.
L1.3
Development yield for a Future Suburban Living Area is to accord with the neighbourhood plan and Local government infrastructure plan.

3.7.9 Element 5.8 – Brisbane's Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors

Table 3.7.9.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors provide opportunities for a range of more intense urban form, mix of land uses and activities that are tailored to the locality and catchment's community needs in accordance with the applicable land use strategies.
L1.1
Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors, identified on the Brisbane selected Transport Corridors and Growth Nodes Strategic Framework Map, are focused on land within the centre zone on the following transport corridors that are described in more detail below:
(a) Logan Road transport corridor—Kangaroo Point to Upper Mount Gravatt;
(b) Gympie Road and Northern Busway transport corridor—Royal Brisbane Hospital to Carseldine;
(c) Old Cleveland Road and Eastern Busway transport corridor—Stones Corner to Carindale;
(d) Brisbane South Rail transport corridor—Princess Alexandra Hospital to Coopers Plains;
(e) Kingsford Smith Drive transport corridor—Newstead to Hamilton;
(f) Brisbane South-west Rail transport corridor—Milton to Wacol;
(g) Enoggera Road and North-west Rail transport corridor—Kelvin Grove to Mitchelton;
(h) Brisbane North-east Rail transport corridor—Bowen Hills to Northgate;
(i) Brisbane East Rail transport corridor—Buranda to Cannon Hill.
L1.2
Planned Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors provide for future growth in accordance with a neighbourhood plan.
L1.3
(a) to be the subject of the following:
(i) a future neighbourhood plan prepared by the Council during the life of the planning scheme; or
(ii) a comprehensive planning process which involves a local area and precinct approach, community consultation and consideration of the planning matters consistent with the scope of a neighbourhood plan prepared by the Council;
(b) only to be developed for future growth beyond the character, scale and density provided for in the current balance of zones in the planning scheme area where the following are satisfied:
(i) development is on land other than land in the Low density residential zone or identified in the Traditional building character overlay;
(ii) development is within:
(A) 400m walking distance from the edge of a centre zone other than the Neighbourhood centre zone; or
(B) 400 metres walking distance from a zone that provides for the Special Centres identified in Section 3.7.5.1 L1.1 in Theme 5 of the Strategic Framework;
(iii) the subject site of development is predominantly on land with an area greater than 5000m2;
(iv) the infrastructure required to deliver the future growth has been identified, costed and provided for by an infrastructure agreement or an amendment to an applicable infrastructure planning and delivery mechanism such as the Local government infrastructure plan;
(v) development delivers all land use strategies within this element.

Note—The Structure Planning planning scheme policy and the Social and Health Impact Assessment planning scheme policy provides guidance and assistance on the scope of matters that should be considered in order to support this land use strategy. Community consultation should be consistent with current approaches to neighbourhood planning in terms of the process, activities, scale, timing and outcomes being applied.

SO2
Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors provide an integrated urban form and exhibit leading practice in urban and public domain design and social and environmental outcomes.
L2.1
Development provides for a mix of uses, densities and urban form which support walkable, self-contained communities that:
(a) reduce vehicle-based trips;
(b) provide choice of housing types;
(c) provide access to employment, retail and commercial services, recreational opportunities and community facilities;
(d) protect residential amenity commensurate with its location.
L2.2
Development for some limited commercial uses in a Growth Node may be provided for within the applicable neighbourhood plan, to act as a separating buffer for residential development from adverse air and noise impacts created by the transport corridors.
L2.3
Development in a Growth Node is to face lower order streets as identified in any existing neighbourhood plan and not just address the road or railway line within the transport corridor.
L2.4
Development is of a scale and density that is commensurate with the capacity of the transport network and reflects capital, recurrent and planned expenditure on infrastructure networks.
L2.5
Development provides an enhanced standard of urban and public domain and environmental and social outcomes.
L2.6
Mixed use development offers a choice of housing types and appropriate community infrastructure.
SO3
Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors are based on railway stations and land within the centre zone which are focus points of activity, accessibility and employment.
L3
Centres within Growth Nodes:
(a) reflect their distinctive identity, built form, intensity and land use mix;
(b) are intensive mixed use nodes of commercial, retail and residential activities and local services and facilities;
(c) are developed in accordance with agreed transit oriented development principles in the applicable neighbourhood plan;
(d) are developed using design principles aimed at protecting health and amenity for residents and workers and protecting environmental values;
(e) have high-quality access to high- frequency public transport services within a walkable catchment;
(f) have a high-quality public domain which provides high levels of pedestrian and cycle accessibility and permeability with safe and direct connections between public transport stops, the centre and surrounding neighbourhoods;
(g) provide a variety of housing types that accommodate the community's different life stages including aged-care accommodation and dwellings of various configurations and sizes;
(h) provide a network of high-quality public spaces such as urban commons and local informal use parks to satisfy local community needs.
SO4
Growth Nodes on Selected Transport Corridors protect the character and amenity of the surrounding Suburban Living Areas within which they are located.
L4
Development is of a scale and mass that provides an appropriate transition in building height and bulk to the Suburban Living Areas in particular those adjoining neighbourhoods that are sensitive to the physical and visual character and amenity of adjoining neighbourhoods with lower development intensities and building heights.
Logan Road transport corridor—Kangaroo Point to Upper Mount Gravatt

The Logan Road transport corridor—Kangaroo Point to Upper Mount Gravatt, begins on Main Street extending south to Woolloongabba and Buranda then stretches along Logan Road between the Stones Corner corridor centre (refer Eastern Busway Corridor profile) and Upper Mount Gravatt.

This transport corridor may require road widening to achieve the alignment that is sufficient to provide for public and private transport capacity, and for safe and convenient active transport within the transport corridor.

Access through Stones Corner, Holland Park and Mount Gravatt Central is constrained and further investigation is required to identify and implement improvements.

The Upper Mt Gravatt Principal Regional Activity Centre, as outlined in the SEQ Regional Plan 2009-2031, anchors the transport corridor to the south. It will develop as a substantial suburban office market with supporting services. The office area will expand along Logan Road. Higher density dwellings will locate in and around the Principal Regional Activity Centre, particularly to its north-east. The Principal Regional Activity Centre is located on the South East Busway which will be extended from Eight Mile Plains to Springwood by 2026.

Corridor centres within the transport corridors at Stones Corner, Greenslopes, Greenslopes Mall, Holland Park, Mount Gravatt East and Mount Gravatt Central will develop with higher density residential and employment uses.

Parks and public places within the Norman Creek catchment will be enhanced and upgraded. Glindemann Park provides a linear green connection between the Holland Park and Mount Gravatt East corridor centres.

The Bulimba Creek multifunctional corridor within the Greenspace System provides a strategic pedestrian and cyclist link between the Upper Mt Gravatt Principal Regional Activity Centre and surrounding neighbourhoods.

The transport corridor contains a range of existing parks, however further recreation opportunities and other complementary community facilities will be required to service a growing population.

A subtropical boulevard will be created along Logan Road, either through major road projects or as development along the corridor proceeds. It has the potential to become a commercial main street linking and serving the growing residential communities.

Gympie Road and Northern Busway transport corridor—Royal Brisbane Hospital to Carseldine

The Gympie Road and Northern Busway transport corridor—Royal Brisbane Hospital to Carseldine follows Lutwyche and Gympie roads between the Royal Brisbane Hospital and Carseldine. The busway construction to Kedron is completed, with the extension to Carseldine proposed for completion prior to 2026.

Growth in this transport corridor will need to be coordinated with significant local and regional transport network improvements. Access throughout the transport corridor is constrained particularly with congestion at major intersections. Airport Link and the completion of the Northern Busway will assist in alleviating congestion in the short to medium term. In the long term, the desired standard of service for movement will be underpinned by regional network solutions including the Western Orbital Motorway project, Stafford Road upgrade and the North-west Rail Corridor.

Road capacity constraints exist along the southern section of the transport corridor. Further investigation will be required to identify required corridor augmentation.

The Chermside Principal Regional Activity Centre anchors the transport corridor and will provide significant levels of regional employment, including retail and commercial services, entertainment and recreational facilities and a major community hub, supported by high-density residential dwellings.

Commercial development will extend along Gympie Road to the north and south. Marchant and 7th Brigade parks adjoin the Chermside Principal Regional Activity Centre to the north providing regional recreation opportunities to cater for the growing worker and resident population.

The Prince Charles Hospital adjoins the Chermside Principal Regional Activity Centre to the west and higher density residential and employment precincts will integrate these two nodes. The hospital will provide a node for continued growth in supporting health services and worker, outpatient and visitor accommodation in the immediate surrounds.

Corridor centres at Windsor, Lutwyche, Gordon Park, Kedron and Aspley will develop with higher density residential and employment opportunities supported by high-density residential development. The Aspley corridor centre will continue to support a diverse range of affordable housing and housing suited to seniors.

A new corridor centre at the Carseldine Railway Station will create an intermodal node, and will serve the new community of the Fitzgibbon Chase.

A subtropical boulevard will be created along Lutwyche and Gympie roads, either through major road projects or as development along the transport corridor proceeds.

The Kedron Brook, Downfall Creek, Cabbage Tree Creek, Breakfast Creek and Enoggera Creek multifunctional Greenspace System corridors provide strategic east–west pedestrian and cyclist links. These linear parklands provide designated active transport connections from within the transport corridor with surrounding neighbourhoods.

Old Cleveland Road and Eastern Busway transport corridor—Stones Corner to Carindale

The Old Cleveland Road and Eastern Busway transport corridor—Stones Corner to Carindale stretches along the high-frequency Eastern Busway route that follows Old Cleveland Road between Stones Corner and Carindale.

Extension of the Eastern Busway provides for an attractive and convenient alternative to travelling along the transport corridor by road. Private vehicle access through Stones Corner is constrained and further investigation is required to identify and implement feasible improvements.

The Carindale Principal Regional Activity Centre anchors the transport corridor to the east and will continue to serve a major retail, community and professional service and entertainment function, with some surrounding increased density residential development, particularly to the south and linking towards the Carina corridor centre.

Corridor centres at Stones Corner, Coorparoo and Carina will each develop a distinctive identity and will build upon existing character values, with higher density residential and employment uses.

The Carina corridor centre will continue to support a diverse range of key worker housing and housing suited to older people.

A subtropical boulevard will be created along Old Cleveland Road, either through major road projects or as development along the transport corridor proceeds.

Langlands Park is developing as a sporting and recreation hub.

The Bulimba Creek multifunctional corridor within the Greenspace System provides recreational opportunities and a strategic pedestrian and cyclist link between the Carindale Principal Regional Activity Centre and surrounding neighbourhoods.

Brisbane South Rail transport corridor—Princess Alexandra Hospital to Coopers Plains

The Brisbane South Rail transport corridor—Princess Alexandra Hospital to Coopers Plains follows the Beenleigh line from the Princess Alexandra Hospital to Coopers Plains, with stations at Dutton Park, Fairfield, Yeronga, Yeerongpilly, Moorooka, Rocklea, Salisbury and Coopers Plains. Major roads, including Ipswich and Fairfield roads, are in proximity to the transport corridor, and neighbourhood planning undertaken in the area should include those roads and associated land uses.

The major road corridors may require capacity improvements sufficient to provide for public and private transport capacity, and for safe and convenient active transport. Construction of the planned Cross River Rail suburban rail network will underpin growth for the transport corridor and improve connections to Woolloongabba and the City Centre and provide improved connectivity to the remainder of the rail network.

Corridor centres are located at each of the railway stations at Fairfield, Yeronga, Yeerongpilly, Moorooka, Rocklea, Salisbury and Coopers Plains and will encourage transit-supported development including increased densities.

Key parklands and recreational facilities are accessed from the corridor centres including the Yeronga Memorial Park recreation facilities and the Queensland Government Tennis Centre at Tennyson. Queensland Government lands at the Yeerongpilly corridor centre will be developed by the Queensland Government as a demonstration transit-supported development site.

The Coopers Plains corridor centre will continue to support a diverse range of affordable and key worker housing and housing suited to older people.

Southern corridor centres will provide opportunities for greater housing choices, serving major education facilities such as Griffith University and other nearby employment hubs. The corridor also hosts a number of important Special Centres with a research focus, such as the Ecosciences Precinct at Boggo Road Urban Village, Dutton Park.

Kingsford Smith Drive transport corridor—Newstead to Hamilton

The Kingsford Smith Drive transport corridor—Newstead to Hamilton stretches along Kingsford Smith Drive between Newstead and Northshore Hamilton, providing an important link between the City Centre and the Brisbane Airport and Australia TradeCoast.

Current Kingsford Smith Drive upgrades at the eastern end will assist in transport movements through this transport corridor to the Australia TradeCoast. Further augmentation may be required to underpin the ultimate growth of this transport corridor including investigation and improvements through to Breakfast Creek. Bus priority and provision for active transport will need to be included. Additional ferry services and facilities are expected to accommodate some of the transport demand generated from the Northshore Hamilton area, nearby growing communities and the growing employment areas of the Australia TradeCoast.

This transport corridor contains two large riverfront development areas that will include residential and mixed use development in conjunction with a tourism and recreation focus.

Northshore Hamilton anchors this corridor to the east. The site covers 304ha and will accommodate over 300,000m2 of non-residential, predominantly retail and entertainment- focused development.

The Newstead corridor centre is the centre of the 17ha mixed use Newstead Riverpark residential, business and retail precinct. It will contain significant public spaces and active travel and ferry links to the City Centre.

The Albion neighbourhood plan provides for some increased residential development supporting commercial and light industrial uses north of Kingsford Smith Drive.

The Racecourse Road corridor centre creates a vibrant mixed use linear centre with a lifestyle retail and dining and commercial focus, linking Northshore Hamilton with surrounding neighbourhoods.

The 108ha Bowen Hills area on the western side of the corridor is intended as the northern gateway to the City Centre, capitalising upon its significant transport assets. It will be a mixed use precinct and also contain major events spaces and a wide range of housing choices including affordable housing options.

The Skills Tech Campus at Eagle Farm will provide opportunities for specialised research, education and technology activities.

A subtropical boulevard will be created along Kingsford Smith Drive Road, either as part of major road projects and/or as development along the corridor proceeds.

Brisbane South-west Rail transport corridor—Milton to Wacol

The Brisbane South-west Rail transport corridor—Milton to Wacol follows the Ipswich line from Milton to Wacol and services one of the most important major industrial areas in Brisbane.

This is one of the most diverse corridors with significant commercial, health, education and residential growth potential at its northern end and employment and residential growth associated with industry at its southern end.

There is no expansion of uses envisaged around character suburbs like Chelmer.

Growth in this transport corridor will need to be coordinated with infrastructure upgrades to the road and rail transport network. Access through the transport corridor is constrained, including along Oxley Road, over the Walter Taylor Bridge to Indooroopilly and at Toowong Central. Augmentation upgrades will need to be identified and improvements made to achieve a desired standard of service for road transport, and to include safe and convenient access for active transport travel.

Investigation is required to increase capacity for the bus network between the University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus and Moggill Road, Indooroopilly. In the longer term, growth of the transport corridor will be underpinned through an expansion of the suburban rail network particularly the Toowong–Auchenflower transport corridor through to the City Centre.

The Indooroopilly Principal Regional Activity Centre is the most significant centre along the corridor with a strong retail and commercial service focus, a cluster of community facilities that supports higher density dwellings.

The Toowong Major Regional Activity Centre will have a strong commercial office focus due to the centre’s proximity to the City Centre, including via the Centennial pedestrian and cyclist route along the Brisbane River. Higher density residential development builds on the centre’s proximity to the river and the University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus.

Corridor centres at Milton, Auchenflower, Taringa, Sherwood, Corinda, Oxley, Darra and Wacol will develop with higher density residential and employment uses.

The Auchenflower corridor centre will provide a range of supporting health services and visitor accommodation associated with the Wesley Hospital.

The Darra corridor centre is located on the junction of the Ipswich and Springfield railway lines and provides the main public transport access for workers to the South Western Corridor major industrial area. The corridor centre’s expansion will cater to workers’ needs and a growing resident population with efficient access provided to the nearby specialised employment precincts and augmentation of community facilities and services to match population growth.

The Wacol precinct within the Richlands—Wacol corridor neighbourhood plan provides for future expansion of industry supported by regional transport networks including motorways and the Springfield and Ipswich rail corridors.

Enoggera Road and North-west Rail transport corridor—Kelvin Grove to Mitchelton

The Enoggera Road and North-west Rail transport corridor—Kelvin Grove to Mitchelton stretches along Kelvin Grove and Enoggera roads from Kelvin Grove Urban Village to Alderley Railway Station and then west along the railway line to Mitchelton. Duplication of the railway track from Mitchelton to Ferny Grove is to be completed by 2013.

Capacity constraints exist at intersections along the transport corridor. Further investigation will be required to identify required corridor augmentation. Planning mechanisms will also need to be applied including sequencing and land use mix to promote self-containment.

In the longer term, public transport will underpin growth in the corridor with particular emphasis on expansion of the suburban rail network including the North-west Rail Link that will reduce some demand for road space in the inner section.

The Mitchelton Major Regional Activity Centre anchors the transport corridor to the west and will provide subregional employment and community services. Increased density dwellings will build on the major retail, recreational and educational opportunities provided in the community facilities that surround the Major Regional Activity Centre.

Corridor centres at Newmarket, Alderley and Enoggera will develop with increased density residential development supporting key employment destinations, including the Enoggera Military Camp and the specialist education activities at the Queensland University of Technology campus adjoining the Kelvin Grove Urban Village.

The Enoggera corridor centre provides a bus and rail interchange.

The Enoggera Military Camp adjoins the transport corridor. It represents one of the largest landholdings in Brisbane.

The Kedron Brook multifunctional corridor within the Greenspace System provides a strategic east–west pedestrian and cyclist link between the Mitchelton Major Regional Activity Centre and surrounding neighbourhoods.

The Enoggera Creek multifunctional corridor within the Greenspace System also provides a strategic east–west pedestrian and cyclist link between the Newmarket corridor centre and surrounding neighbourhoods.

Brisbane North-east Rail transport corridor—Bowen Hills to Northgate

The Brisbane North-east Rail transport corridor—Bowen Hills to Northgate follows the Caboolture line between Bowen Hills and Northgate, with stations at Albion, Wooloowin, Eagle Junction, Toombul, Nundah and Northgate.

Growth in this transport corridor will need to be coordinated with improvements to the local and regional transport networks.

In the longer term, growth in the transport corridor will be underpinned by the suburban rail network. With extra demand placed on all networks, regional network solutions including the Western Orbital Motorway project, Gateway Arterial system and North-west Rail corridor may be required to ensure that a desired standard of service for movement is achieved on both the road and rail networks.

The Toombul—Nundah Major Regional Activity Centre anchors the transport corridor to the north and will provide subregional employment opportunities and community services. Nundah provides a diverse range of retail, commercial and residential uses. The Major Regional Activity Centre will provide increased density dwellings including short-term accommodation due to proximity to the Brisbane Airport.

Corridor centres at Albion, Eagle Junction and Northgate will develop increasing the density of residential and employment uses.

The Kedron Brook multifunctional corridor within the Greenspace System provides a strategic pedestrian and cyclist link between the Toombul—Nundah Major Regional Activity Centre, recreational opportunities at Kalinga Park and surrounding neighbourhoods.

Brisbane East Rail transport corridor—Norman Creek to Cannon Hill

The Brisbane East Rail transport corridor—Norman Creek to Cannon Hill follows the Cleveland line from Buranda to Cannon Hill with stations at Coorparoo, Norman Park, Morningside and Cannon Hill. Cleveland rail corridor upgrades are to be finalised by 2026.

This transport corridor will require some augmentation along Wynnum Road to improve traffic efficiency, however growth in the corridor will continue to be underpinned by the suburban rail network.

Corridor centres at Morningside and Cannon Hill will develop with increased density residential and employment uses.

The transport corridor is well supplied with a range of community facilities and recreation opportunities that will service a growing population, including many educational establishments, the CP Bottomley Park and open spaces along the Norman Creek Greenspace System corridor. This area also provides strategic pedestrian and cyclist links to surrounding neighbourhoods.

3.7.10 Element 5.9 – Brisbane's Strategic Inner City Industrial Areas

Table 3.7.10.1—Specific outcomes and land use strategies
Specific outcomes
Land use strategies
SO1
Strategic Inner City Industrial Areas provide a range of industry and industrial related uses with a focus on industrial, service trades, logistics, construction, automotive services, office support and research.
L1.1
Land use zoning provides a basis for industrial and industrial related development.
L1.2
Development enhances the industrial and industry related functions.
L1.3
Development manages potential impacts to not compromise the ongoing mix of uses or the surrounding sensitive land uses.
SO2
The ongoing range, mix and focus of activities and uses in Strategic Inner City Industrial Areas will be responsive to changing business and community needs.
L2.1
Development of non-industrial uses that are less compatible with industry is not supported without undertaking comprehensive planning consist with Element 3.7.9.
L2.2
Development retains a focus on economic activity, business and employment in whatever ongoing land uses and mix of land uses is determined.
L2.3
The scale and intensity of development is consistent with industrial uses or the outcomes and strategies of underlying strategic framework Theme 5 elements only where L2.2 above is achieved.
^ Back to Top