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7.2.14.5 Newstead north neighbourhood plan code

7.2.14.5.1 Application

(1) This code applies to assessing a material change of use, reconfiguring a lot, operational work or building work in the Newstead north neighbourhood plan area if:
(a) accepted development subject to compliance with identified requirements, where acceptable outcomes in section A of this code are identified requirements in a table of assessment for a neighbourhood plan (section 5.9); or
(b) assessable development where this code is an applicable code identified in the assessment benchmarks column of a table of assessment for a neighbourhood plan (section 5.9); or
(c) impact assessable development.
(2) Land in the Newstead north neighbourhood plan area is identified on the NPM-014.5 Newstead north neighbourhood plan map and includes the following precincts:
(a) Mixed use transition precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-001);
(b) Breakfast Creek precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-002);
(c) Montpelier mixed use precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-003);
(d) Evelyn Street industrial precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-004).
(3) When using this code, reference should be made to section 1.5, section 5.3.2 and section 5.3.3.

Note—The following purpose, overall outcomes, performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes comprise the assessment benchmarks of this code.

Note—This neighbourhood plan includes a table of assessment with variations to categories of development and assessment. Refer to Table 5.9.79.A, Table 5.9.79.B, Table 5.9.79.C and Table 5.9.79.D.

7.2.14.5.2 Purpose

(1) The purpose of the Newstead north neighbourhood plan code is to provide finer grained planning at a local level for the Newstead north neighbourhood plan area.
(2) The purpose of the Newstead north neighbourhood plan code will be achieved through overall outcomes including overall outcomes for each precinct of the neighbourhood plan area.
(3) The overall outcomes for the neighbourhood plan area are:
(a) Newstead north’s strategic position affords it a key role within the city as one of few remaining inner-city industrial areas. Development facilitates the continuation and evolution of industrial activities that reflect Newstead north’s SICIAs designation by providing for a mix of industry and business activities within the Low impact industry zone that support the economy and community needs.
(b) The Low impact industry and Mixed use zones work in a complementary way to cater for a range of creative industries. Shops and food and drink outlets that are not ancillary to or associated with the primary use of the premises as a low impact industry are not supported in the Low impact industry zone.
(c) Development provides opportunities for creative industries and flexible live/work arrangements through dwelling units in the Low impact industry zone, that are occupied by the direct employees of the principal non-residential use of the premises and their family and/or children, and where the impacts of on site activities from the primary industrial use can be managed in a manner that does not compromise the continued or future industrial function of the Low impact industry zone.
(d) Development manages visual, air, odour, light and noise impacts through appropriate siting and building design, to achieve a level of amenity consistent with the zone, zone precinct and neighbourhood plan outcomes, recognising that residential amenity in a low impact industry use area will not be to the same level that might be expected in residential zones and areas.
(e) Development in Newstead north maintains a lower scale of built form than that of nearby Bowen Hills, Newstead Riverpark and Fortitude Valley. Development is of a height, scale and form that maintains the visual prominence of key natural features and local landmarks including Newstead Hill, Montpelier Hill, the Brisbane River and Breakfast Creek.
(f) Development is designed to take advantage of Brisbane’s subtropical climate and delivers high quality, subtropical architecture. Buildings, public realm and landscape are open, engaging and green, with shaded spaces and opportunities to interact with the street, and contribute to Brisbane’s identity and lifestyle.
(g) Development mitigates the flood and coastal hazard risk through its location, siting, design, construction and amenity whilst providing well-designed buildings that contribute to a positive streetscape.
(h) Development includes land uses, development levels and building designs that are able to withstand coastal hazards and account for rising sea levels.
(i) Development provides increased public access to Breakfast Creek and Ross Street Park.
(j) Development adjacent to public spaces is designed to increase surveillance and activation.
(k) Development provides high-quality streetscape treatments and arcades that improve pedestrian access within Newstead north and to key destinations including Bowen Hills station, the Brisbane River and Gasworks Plaza.
(4) Mixed use transition precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-001) overall outcome is:
(a) This precinct acts as a transition between the adjoining Low impact industry zone to the west and Medium density residential zone to the east by supporting a range of business and residential uses. Creative industries that complement the adjoining SICIA are supported in this precinct and centre activities are limited in scale so as not to compete with the District centre on Breakfast Creek Road.
(5) Breakfast Creek precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-002) overall outcomes are:
(a) Development includes a mix of retail, business and commercial activities. Residential uses are not appropriate unless flooding and coastal hazards can be addressed and development can provide an appropriate interface to the nearby Low impact industry zone.
(b) Development bulk and scale maintains the open, low scale setting of the area and the prominence of natural and heritage landmarks and public view corridors identified in Figure a.
(c) Development incorporates high quality public realm elements to encourage increased pedestrian movement along Ross Street, Breakfast Creek and to Newstead Park.
(d) Development opposite the entry to Newstead Park creates a sense of arrival to the park through the provision of a significant tree and streetscape improvements.
(6) Montpelier mixed use precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-003) overall outcomes is:
(a) Development has a low-scale interface with Dunlop Street and Roche Avenue to maintain residential amenity.
(7) Evelyn Street industrial precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-004) overall outcomes are:
(a) This precinct provides for low impact industry, service industry and outdoor sales activities.
(b) Offices are appropriate where the site is used for low impact industry, service industry or outdoor sales.
(c) Industrial buildings may be used for small-scale uses, such as indoor sport and recreation, that serve the local community. These uses do not involve building work and allow the site to be used for industrial purposes again in the future.

7.2.14.5.3 Performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes

Table 7.2.14.5.3.A—Performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes
Performance outcomes
Acceptable outcomes
Section A—If for accepted development subject to compliance with identified requirements (acceptable outcomes only) or assessable development if involving a dwelling unit in the Low impact industry zone
PO1
Development for a dwelling unit is subordinate in size and function and is an inconspicuous component of the primary use of the premises for an industry use.
Development does not compromise the ongoing use of the site for industrial purposes.
Development is limited to 1 dwelling unit to house a person of that household employed on the site.
AO1.1
Development for a dwelling unit has a maximum building height of 15m.
AO1.2
Development for a dwelling unit is limited to 1 dwelling unit per premises.
AO1.3
Development for a dwelling unit comprises 1 household only.
AO1.4
Development for a dwelling unit is occupied by a person of that household who is employed or engaged as part of their primary occupation with the activities undertaken on the site.
AO1.5
Development for a dwelling unit has a maximum gross floor area of 60m2.
PO2
Development for a dwelling unit does not place residents at risk or exposure to:
(a) noise levels that exceed the noise (planning) criteria in Table 7.2.14.5.3.C;
(b) air emissions that exceed the air quality criteria in Table 7.2.14.5.3.D;
(c) odour levels that exceed the odour criteria in Table 7.2.14.5.3.E;
(d) health risks that exceed the health risk assessment criteria in Table 7.2.14.5.3.F.

Note—A noise impact assessment report prepared in accordance with the Noise impact assessment planning scheme policy can assist in demonstrating achievement of this performance outcome.

Note—An air quality impact report prepared in accordance with the Air quality planning scheme policy can assist in demonstrating achievement of this performance outcome.

AO2
Development for a dwelling unit is not located within 150m of a spray painting workshop.
PO3
Development for a dwelling unit provides for onsite car parking for residents.
AO3
Development for a dwelling unit is provided with 1 dedicated car parking space in addition to the parking, servicing and manoeuvring areas associated with the primary non-residential use of the site.
PO4
Development for a dwelling unit has sufficient outdoor private open space.
AO4
Development for a dwelling unit provides private open space:
(a) at ground-floor, at least 30m2 with a minimum dimension of 5m that is screened from other activities on the site;
(b) above ground-floor level, comprising a balcony or roof area open to the sky, with a minimum area of 8m2 and a minimum dimension of 2m that is directly accessible from a living room.
PO5
Development for a dwelling unit must:
(a) be located, designed and constructed to protect bedrooms and other habitable rooms from exposure to noise arising from non-residential activities outside the building;
(b) be designed and constructed to achieve a minimum reduction in sound pressure level between the exterior of the building and the bedrooms or indoor primary living areas of 30dBA.

Note—A noise impact assessment report prepared in accordance with the Noise impact assessment planning scheme policy can assist in demonstrating achievement of this performance outcome.

AO5
Development for a dwelling unit has a minimum acoustic performance of:
(a) Rw 35 for glazing (windows and doors) where total area of glazing is greater than 1.8m2;
(b) Rw 32 for glazing (windows and doors) where total area of glazing is less than or equal to 1.8m2.
Section B—If for assessable development
PO6
Development is designed to respond to its site context and setting and exhibits high-quality architectural design.
Development is of a height, scale and form that achieves the intended outcome for the precinct, improves the amenity of the neighbourhood plan area, contributes to a cohesive streetscape and built form character and is:
(a) consistent with the anticipated density and assumed infrastructure demand;
(b) aligned to community expectations about the number of storeys to be built;
(c) proportionate to and commensurate with the utility of the site area and frontage width;
(d) designed so as not to cause a significant and undue adverse amenity impact to adjoining development;
(e) sited to enable existing and future buildings to be well separated from each other and to not prejudice the development of an adjoining site;
(f) limited in height to maintain the visual prominence and topographical change of Montpelier Hill.

Note—Development that exceeds the intended number of storeys or building height can place disproportionate pressure on the transport network, public space or community facilities in particular.

Note—Development that is over-scaled for its site can result in an undesirable dominance of vehicle access, parking and manoeuvring areas that significantly reduce streetscape character and amenity,

AO6
Development complies with the number of storeys and building height in Table 7.2.14.5.3.B.

Note—Neighbourhood plans will mostly specify a maximum number of storeys where zone outcomes have been varied in relation to building height. Some neighbourhood plans may also specify height in metres. Development must comply with both parameters where maximum number of storeys and height in metres are specified.

Note—The preparation of an Urban context report in accordance with Table 7.2.14.5.3.G will assist in demonstrating achievement of outcomes of this neighbourhood plan.

Note—Council’s Independent Design Advisory Panel may be invited to provide advice on development, to facilitate high quality development, in accordance with the provisions of the Independent design advisory panel planning scheme policy.

Editor’s note—The Council’s New World City Design Guide - Buildings that Breathe document sets out the vision, design elements and best practice case studies to provide guidance on how to achieve subtropical design outcomes in the centre, mixed use and medium density residential zones.

PO7
Development accommodates buildings of a scale and design that:
(a) maintains the open, low-scale setting of the area and the prominence of natural and heritage landmarks;
(b) contributes to a low-scale fine-grain streetscape;
(c) incorporates a clear podium and tower form with towers set back to reduce their bulk and visibility from the street;
(d) maintains the public view corridors indicated on Figure a. To achieve this, development:
(i) provides building forms that retain views to the relevant feature beside and in between towers;
(ii) ensures building placement maintains sight of the feature from the locations on Figure a;
(e) includes deep planting to buffer development from Breakfast Creek Road.

Note—Development must demonstrate how impacts on view corridors have been managed by building design and placement by undertaking a view analysis, which includes a sketch or photomontage from the locations marked on Figure a. View analysis should demonstrate the development proposal, existing development and specified geographic features. On catalyst sites the view analysis must consider cumulative effects of site master planning. Three-dimensional modelling must be submitted in a format suitable for confirmation of the outcomes of view analysis in Council’s Virtual Brisbane model.

AO7.1
Development has a maximum podium height of 2 storeys.
AO7.2
Development ensures the maximum tower site cover for sites 1,800m2 or greater does not exceed 50% in the Breakfast Creek precinct or the Mixed use transition precinct.

Note—Tower site cover is:

  • the combined average area of the 5 largest storeys of each building (being the full area of any storey located wholly or partially above the maximum podium height identified in A07.1) as a portion of the original site area;
  • calculated as the area bounded by the outside of the external wall, including balconies but excluding projections.
AO7.3
Development complies with the number of storeys and building height in Table 7.2.14.5.3.B.

Note—Neighbourhood plans will mostly specify a maximum number of storeys where zone outcomes have been varied in relation to building height. Some neighbourhood plans may also specify height in metres. Development must comply with both parameters where maximum number of storeys and height in metres are specified.

AO7.4
Development complies with all applicable setbacks.
PO8
Development manages flooding and withstands coastal hazards through its location, siting, design, construction and operation while providing a well-designed land use and built form and landscape response that enhances the public realm.
AO8.1
Development incorporates stepped landscaped edges to minimise the visual impact of raised floor levels at the ground plane as illustrated in Figure b.
AO8.2
Development in the Breakfast Creek precinct is for non-residential development and is designed to withstand coastal hazards.
AO8.3
Development fronting the northern side of Austin Street that cannot provide a driveway which is trafficable during the defined flood event from Austin Street, provides alternative vehicular access or a driveway which is trafficable during the defined flood event from Maud Street.
PO9
Development adjacent to Breakfast Creek preserves land adjoining the creek for public use along the entire creek frontage.
AO9
Development preserves a publicly accessible open space corridor along the southern side of Breakfast Creek with a minimum width of 6m of land which is measured from the top of the revetment wall or the high water mark, whichever is lesser, in accordance with Figure a.
PO10
Development adjacent to Breakfast Creek, Ross Street Park, the Booroodabin and Cowlishaw Street Park is designed to address and activate the creek and public parks.
AO10.1
Development ensures that a building elevation facing Breakfast Creek or a public space provides opportunities for passive surveillance through the orientation of awnings, windows and balconies towards the creek or public space.
AO10.2
Development locates employee recreation areas and offices nearest to, and overlooking, Breakfast Creek.
AO10.3
Development does not involve a basement wall fronting Breakfast Creek of more than 1m above the ground level.
PO11
Development that includes an arcade as indicated on Figure a provides a publicly accessible arcade as part of development is easily accessed, attractive and supports personal safety.
AO11.1
Development that includes an arcade as indicated on Figure a provides an arcade that facilitates pedestrian and cyclist movement adjoining and through a site at street level or at-grade.

Note—Grade-separated pedestrian movement systems, such as an overhead bridge or underpass, are avoided because they are less attractive and safe for users.

AO11.2
Development that includes an arcade as indicated on Figure a which is intended for public access at night complies with:
(a) AS/NZS 1158.3.1:2005 Lighting for roads and public spaces Category P3;
(b) AS 4282-1997 Control of the obtrusive effects of outdoor lighting.
PO12
Development that includes an arcade as indicated on Figure a:
(a) provides a direct, convenient, comfortable, safe and publicly accessible connection that enhances the local pedestrian network;
(b) has an obvious street presence and provides a landscaped shaded entry by way of a significant tree;
(c) is activated and overlooked by adjoining uses;
(d) has high-quality finishes and materials;
(e) maximises safety.
AO12.1
Development that includes an arcade as indicated on Figure a:
(a) provides pedestrian access during hours of operation of the use;
(b) integrates with adjoining buildings;
(c) links established streets and pedestrian networks;
(d) has a minimum corridor width of 6m, including a minimum unobstructed pavement width of 3m;
(e) is adjoined and overlooked by active uses;
(f) is finished with high-quality materials that ensure public safety;
(g) is provided at-grade and connects safely without any lip or step;
(h) incorporates crime prevention through environmental design principles to maximise safety;
(i) has signage at each end identifying the connection provided;
(j) is straight and allows for visual connection to the other end.

Note—Crime prevention principles can be found in the Crime prevention through environmental design planning scheme policy.

AO12.2
Development that includes an arcade, where in the Mixed use zone, provides a deep planting area of a 25m2 and a minimum dimension of 4m in any direction on the Breakfast Creek Road frontage opposite the entry to Newstead Park. This deep planting area is to accommodate a large significant tree that reinforces the relationship to Newstead Park and provides shade for pedestrians at the crossing point of Breakfast Creek Road.
PO13
Development provides a prominent visual reference and contribution to the public realm and enhances the public pedestrian experience along Breakfast Creek Road through the provision of significant landscaping and street furniture.
AO13.1
Development provides a truncated corner land dedication in locations identified in the Streetscape hierarchy overlay.
AO13.2
Development includes deep-planted feature trees and seating in the corner land dedication area in accordance with specifications in the Road corridor design section of the Infrastructure design planning scheme policy.
If in the Breakfast Creek precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-002)
PO14
Development adjacent to Breakfast Creek, between Breakfast Creek Road and Ross Street, creates a vibrant local destination that:
(a) connects Newstead Park to Ross Street Park and enhances the publicly accessible waterfront experience along Breakfast Creek through the provision of a plaza;
(b) provides activation at the ground storey that encourages activity in the surrounding public realm;
(c) enhances the gateway experience from Breakfast Creek Road and its context to surrounding areas and views.
AO14.1
Development provides a publicly accessible plaza across the entire creek frontage of the site with a minimum width of 6m of land which is measured from the top of the revetment wall or the high water mark, whichever is lesser, as shown in Figure a.
AO14.2
Development ensures that a building elevation facing the publicly accessible plaza and creek provides opportunities for passive surveillance through the orientation of awnings, windows and balconies towards the plaza or creek.
AO14.3
Development has a ground storey frontage to Breakfast Creek and Ross Street that is occupied by fine-grain retail, food and beverage and other small-scale publicly accessible uses.
Refer to Figure c.
If in the Montpelier mixed use precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP 003)
PO15
Development complements the established low-scale residential streetscape of Roche Avenue and Dunlop Street.
Development does not negatively impact on the amenity of the street.
AO15.1
Development does not provide vehicular access or servicing from Roche Avenue or Dunlop Street.
AO15.2
Development includes low-scale residential uses fronting Roche Avenue or Dunlop Street.
AO15.3
Dwellings are designed with balconies and windows facing the street and have direct pedestrian access from the street.
Refer to Figure d.
AO15.4
Development has a minimum front setback to Roche Avenue or Dunlop Street of:
(a) 3m to a balcony or patio;
(b) 4m to the wall of the building.
If involving a food and drink outlet or a shop in the Low impact industry zone
PO16
Development is ancillary to or associated with, and does not compromise the primary use of the premises as a low impact industry.
Development is low key in scale, nature and employment and of an appropriate size to serve the needs of the local workforce.
AO16
Development has a maximum gross floor area of 50m2.
If in the Evelyn Street industrial precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP 004)
PO17
Development for an office supports the function on the site for low impact industry, service industry or outdoor sales.
AO17
No acceptable outcome is prescribed.
PO18
Development has a front setback consistent with the adjoining existing setbacks.
AO18
Development has a minimum front setback of 6m.
PO19
Development for indoor sport and recreation reuses existing buildings and does not compromise the industrial function of the area and the future use of premises for industrial activities.
Indoor sport and recreation uses are limited to small-scale activities that service only a local catchment of workers and residents.
AO19.1
Development does not involve building work.
AO19.2
Development has a gross floor area of less than 300m2.
PO20
Development for indoor sport and recreation ensures the safety of users.
AO20.1
Development ensures that all activities are contained inside the building.
AO20.2
Development has operating hours consistent with surrounding uses.
AO20.3
Development has car parking located on site that is well lit.
Table 7.2.14.5.3.B—Maximum building height
Development
Building height
If in the Mixed use transition precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-001) or Breakfast Creek precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-002)
Development of a site less than 800m2 or with a frontage of less than 20m
3 storeys
Development of a site 800m2 or greater but less than 1,200m2
5 storeys
Development of a site 1,200m2 or greater
8 storeys
If in the Montpelier mixed use precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP-003)
Development of a site less than 800m2 or with a frontage of less than 20m
9.5m
Development of a site 800m2 or greater
RL 20m AHD
If in the Evelyn Street industrial precinct (Newstead north neighbourhood plan/NPP 004)
Development on any site
15m
Table 7.2.14.5.3.C—Noise (planning) criteria
Location where the criteria applies inside the dwelling unit
Adjusted equivalent continuous sound pressure level (LAeq,adj,T) to be achieved during day, evening and night-time periods
Maximum sound pressure level (LAmax) to be achieved during the night-time period
Day 7am-6pm
LAeq,adj,11hr
Evening 6pm-10pm
LAeq,adj,4hr
Night 10pm-7am
LAeq,adj,9hr
Night 10pm-7am
Bedroom
35dB(A)
35dB(A)
30dB(A)
45dB(A)
Other habitable room
35dB(A)
35dB(A)
35dB(A)
-

Note—

Table 7.2.14.5.3.D—Air quality criteria
Pollutant
Averaging time
Health outcome protected
Criteria including background (µg/m³)
Criteria including background (ppm)
Nitrogen dioxide
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
250
0.12
Annual
Health and wellbeing
62
0.03
Sulfur dioxide
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
570
0.2
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
230
0.08
Annual
Health and wellbeing
57
0.02
Particulate matter (PM) as total suspended particulates (TSP)
Annual
Health and wellbeing
90
-
PM less than 10µm (PM10)
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
50
-
PM less than 2.5µm (PM2.5)
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
25
-
Annual
Health and wellbeing
8
-
Carbon monoxide
8 hours
Health and wellbeing
11,000
9
Dust deposition as insoluble solids
Annual
Protecting aesthetic environment
4g/m2/month
-
1,1,1-trichloroethane (methyl chloroform)
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
12,500
2.3
1,1,2-trichloroethane
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
1,000
0.18
1,1-biphenyl
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
24
0.0037
1,2-dichloroethane
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
750
0.17
1,3-butadiene
Annual
Health and wellbeing
2.4
0.001
Acetaldehyde
1 hour
Odour
42
0.023
Acetic acid
1 hour
Odour
270
0.11
Acetone
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
22,000
9.2
Acrolein
1 hour
USEPA extremely toxic
0.42
0.00018
Acrylonitrile
1 hour
USEPA Group B1 carcinogen (probable human carcinogen)
8
0.0037
Alpha chlorinated toluenes and benzoyl chloride
1 hour
IARC Group 1 carcinogen (known human carcinogen)
9
0.0018
Ammonia
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
330
0.46
Antimony and compounds
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
9
-
Arsenic and compounds (as total metal content in PM10)
1 hour
IARC Group 1 carcinogen (known human carcinogen)
0.09
-
Annual
Health and wellbeing
6ng/m³
-
Benzene
Annual
Health and wellbeing
10
0.003
Benzo(a)pyrene (as marker for PAH)
Annual
Health and wellbeing
0.3ng/m³
-
Beryllium and compounds
1 hour
IARC Group 1 carcinogen (known human carcinogen)
0.004
-
Bromochloromethane
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
19,000
3.7
Bromoform (tribromomethane)
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
90
0.009
Bromotrifluoromethane
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
112,000
18
Butyl acrylate
1 hour
Odour
100
0.019
Butyl mercaptan
1 hour
Odour
7
0.002
Cadmium and compounds (as total metal content in PM10)
Annual
Health and wellbeing
5ng/m³
-
Carbon disulfide
1 hour
Odour
183
0.0055
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
110
0.032
Chlorine
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
50
0.018
Chlorine dioxide
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
5.1
0.0018
Chlorobenzene
1 hour
Odour
100
0.023
Chloroform
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
900
0.18
Chromium III compounds
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
9
-
Chromium VI compounds
1 hour
IARC Group 1 carcinogen (known human carcinogen)
0.09
-
Copper dusts and mists
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
18
-
Copper fumes
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
3.7
-
Cumene (isopropyl benzene)
1 hour
Odour
21
0.004
Cyanide (as CN)
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
90
-
Cyclohexane
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
19,000
5
Cyclohexanone
1 hour
Odour
260
0.07
Diacetone alcohol
1 hour
Odour
700
0.15
Dichloromethane (methylene chloride)
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
3,200
0.85
7 days
Health and wellbeing
480
0.13
Diethylamine
1 hour
Odour
30
0.01
Dimethylamine
1 hour
Odour
9
0.0052
Dioxins and furans (as TCDD TEF)
1 hour
IARC Group 1 carcinogen (known human carcinogen)
0.000002
-
Diphenyl ether
1 hour
Odour
80
0.01
Ethanol
1 hour
Odour
2,100
1.1
Ethyl acetate
1 hour
Odour
12,100
3.5
Ethyl acrylate
1 hour
Odour
0.4
0.0001
Ethyl butyl ketone
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
4,200
0.9
Ethyl chloride (chloroethane)
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
48,000
18
Ethylbenzene
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
8,000
1.8
Ethylene oxide
1 hour
IARC Group 1 carcinogen (known human carcinogen)
3.3
0.0018
Formaldehyde
1 hour
Protecting aesthetic environment
96
0.07
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
54
0.04
Hydrogen chloride
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
140
0.09
Hydrogen cyanide
1 hour
USEPA extremely toxic
200
0.18
Hydrogen sulfide
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
160
0.11
1 hour
Odour
6.5
0.0043
Lead and compounds (as total metal content in total suspended particulates)
Annual
Health and wellbeing
0.5
-
Magnesium oxide fumes
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
180
-
Manganese and compounds (as total metal content in PM10)
Annual
Health and wellbeing
0.16
-
MDI (diphenylmethane diisocyanate)
1 hour
USEPA extremely toxic
0.04
-
Mercury inorganic
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
1.8
-
Annual
Health and wellbeing
1.1
-
Mercury organic
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
0.18
-
Methanol
1 hour
Odour
3,000
2.4
Methyl ethyl ketone
1 hour
Odour
3,200
1.1
Methyl isobutyl ketone
1 hour
Odour
230
0.05
Methyl mercaptan
1 hour
Odour
0.46
0.00023
Methyl methacrylate
1 hour
Odour
120
0.027
Methyl styrene
1 hour
Odour
140
0.029
Methylamine
1 hour
Odour
2.7
0.0023
n-Butanol
1 hour
Odour
500
0.16
n-Butyl acetate
1 hour
Odour
1,020
0.21
n-Hexane
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
3,200
0.9
Nickel and compounds (as total metal content in PM10)
Annual
Health and wellbeing
0.02
-
Nitric acid
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
90
0.037
Nitrobenzene
1 hour
Odour
2.6
0.00052
n-Propanol
1 hour
Odour
41
0.016
Pentachlorophenol
1 hour
USEPA extremely toxic
0.9
-
Phenol
1 hour
Odour
20
0.0052
Phosgene
1 hour
USEPA extremely toxic
7
0.0018
Phosphine
1 hour
Odour
3.1
0.0023
Propylene oxide
1 hour
USEPA Group B1 carcinogen (probable human carcinogen)
90
0.037
Pyridine
1 hour
Odour
7
0.0023
Styrene
1 hour
Odour
65
0.014
7 days
Health and wellbeing
280
0.06
Sulfate
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
27
-
Sulfuric acid
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
18
-
TDI (toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; toluene-2,6-diisocyanate)
1 hour
USEPA extremely toxic
0.04
-
Tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene)
1 hour
Odour
7,487
1.01
Annual
Health and wellbeing
270
0.036
Toluene
1 hour
Odour
958
0.23
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
4,100
1
Annual
Health and wellbeing
410
0.1
Trichloroethylene
1 hour
IARC Group 2A carcinogen (probable human carcinogen)
500
0.09
Triethylamine
1 hour
Odour
200
0.05
Vanadium and compounds (as total metal content in PM10)
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
1.1
-
Vinyl chloride monomer
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
28
0.01
Vinyl toluene
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
4,400
0.9
Welding fumes (total particulate)
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
90
-
Xylenes (as a total of ortho, meta and para isomers)
24 hours
Health and wellbeing
1,200
0.25
Annual
Health and wellbeing
950
0.2
Zinc chloride fumes
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
18
-
Zinc oxide fumes
1 hour
Health and wellbeing
90
-

Note—

Table 7.2.14.5.3.E—Odour criteria
Pollutant
Averaging time
Health outcome protected
Criteria (odour units – OU)
Odour
1 hour
Odour
0.5OU for tall stacks
Odour
1 hour
Odour
2.5OU for ground-level and wake-affected plumes from short stacks

Note—Odour criteria are to be evaluated using the 99.5th percentile concentration from dispersion modelling.

Table 7.2.14.5.3.F—Health risk assessment criteria
Risk type
Incremental health risk criteria for development in isolation
Cumulative health risk criteria for development with background sources of pollutants
Lifetime cancer risk
Less than 1 in 1,000,000
Less than 1 in 100,000
Chronic hazard index
Less than 0.5
Less than 1
Acute hazard index
Less than 0.5
Less than 1

Note—

Table 7.2.14.5.3.G—Urban context report
Content
Scope (and format)
Site characteristics
Demonstrate how the site’s constraints and attributes have been considered in the design of the development.
Cityscape and built form
Demonstrate how the development:
  • provides a site-responsive built form taking into account site characteristics and form of surrounding development, including relationship with other buildings in terms of setbacks, privacy, light and air;
  • provides a contextually responsive built form taking into account site location within Newstead north (e.g. core, garden edge, river edge, gateway);
  • impacts on broader views across the cityscape and of the city skyline;
  • exhibits outstanding architectural merit.
Streetscape
Demonstrate how the development impacts on and contributes to the streetscape and street functioning, in terms of:
  • street building height, setbacks and design;
  • ground level activation, including proportion of glazing and openings;
  • awning heights and continuity;
  • footpath width, continuity and design.
Heritage, landmarks, natural assets, views and vistas
Demonstrate how the development:
  • respects the streetscape and public realm context and setting of nearby heritage buildings and places, landmarks and natural assets;
  • maintains or creates views and vistas from public vantage points, including from the city grid to the river, to heritage places, landmarks and natural assets, and across public realm.
Public realm, connections, attractors and movement network
Demonstrate how the development:
  • respects, enhances, expands and/or connects to adjoining and nearby public realm;
  • maintains and enhances river access;
  • maintains and enhances pedestrian permeability, including to major attractors and the wider movement network.
Subtropical climate
Demonstrate how the development design incorporates orientation, shading, outdoor spaces, natural ventilation, landscaping and articulation to reduce heat loading, protect from weather, optimise natural light and support outdoor lifestyles.

Editor’s note—The Urban context report provides a formal means for developers, architects and designers to clearly articulate how the development successfully responds to the site, its context and climate. This report should comprise plans, diagrams, perspectives, 3D modelling (including use of the Virtual Brisbane 3D model to test development options) and supporting design rationales to demonstrate how the proposal achieves the outcomes of the Neighbourhood Plan code.

Editor’s note—Council’s New World City Design Guide - Buildings that Breathe document sets out the vision, design elements and best practice case studies to guide new development. Development is actively encouraged to incorporate these design elements and embrace the city’s subtropical climate.

View the high resolution of Figure a – Plazas, arcades, open space connections and public view corridors (PDF file size is 386Kb)

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