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7.2.6.2 Fig Tree Pocket neighbourhood plan code

7.2.6.2.1 Application

(1) This code applies to assessing a material change of use, reconfiguring a lot, operational work or building work in the Fig Tree Pocket neighbourhood plan area if:
(a) assessable development where this code is an applicable code identified in the assessment benchmarks column of a table of assessment for a neighbourhood plan (section 5.9); or
(b) impact assessable development.
(2) Land in the Fig Tree Pocket neighbourhood plan area is identified on the NPM-006.2 Fig Tree Pocket neighbourhood plan map.
(3) When using this code, reference should be made to section 1.5, section 5.3.2 and section 5.3.3.

Note—The following purpose, overall outcomes, performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes comprise the assessment benchmarks of this code.

Note—This neighbourhood plan includes a table of assessment with variations to categories of development and assessment. Refer to Table 5.9.26.A, Table 5.9.26.B, Table 5.9.26.C and Table 5.9.26.D.

7.2.6.2.2 Purpose

(1) The purpose of the Fig Tree Pocket neighbourhood plan code is to provide finer grained planning at a local level for the Fig Tree Pocket neighbourhood plan area.
(2) The purpose of the Fig Tree Pocket neighbourhood plan code will be achieved through overall outcomes.
(3) The overall outcomes for the neighbourhood plan area are:
(a) Development creates functional and integrated communities.
(b) Land subject to development constraints or character or environmental values (indicated in a figure in this neighbourhood plan code or shown on an overlay map) are protected from inappropriate development in order to maintain its character and natural and ecological significance.
(c) Open space, parks and recreational facilities meet the needs of the community and are located in accessible locations that are well connected within the neighbourhood plan area.
(d) Development in a potential development area identified in Figure a addresses the location of the land, availability of services, environmental constraints, amenity and existing patterns of development, to ensure an integrated development outcome.
(e) Non-residential uses not consistent with the outcomes sought in potential development areas include bar, club, educational establishment, community care centre, hotel, indoor sport and recreation, health care service, outdoor sport and recreation in the very low density residential potential development area, food and drink outlet and service station.
(f) Residential development provides for a mix of housing types, styles and densities.
(g) The very low density residential potential development area shown in Figure a comprises dwelling houses and some dual occupancy with yields of up 5 dwellings per hectare to ensure minimal disturbance to areas of environmental and scenic value.
(h) A dwelling in the very low density residential potential development area shown in Figure a is located within a development footprint plan where development:
(i) encourages clustering of dwelling houses to reduce development footprints;
(ii) allows different lot sizes and titling so that ecologically significant areas can remain undisturbed as common property or as part of large allotments;
(iii) ensures that fencing along lot boundaries is designed to allow for the movement of fauna;
(iv) includes voluntary conservation agreements with landowners for managing land.

Note—Densities and yields are to be calculated excluding parts of the site that are not within a potential development area. These include areas with development constraints or character or environmental values identified in overlay maps. Yields and maximum gross floor area for multiple dwellings and dual occupancy are to be calculated across the potential development area including all access ways and roads respectively.

(i) The low density residential – dwelling houses potential development area shown in Figure a:
(i) comprises predominantly dwelling houses at a yield of 10 dwellings per hectare;
(ii) accommodates dual occupancy only in the Low–medium density residential zone and at a maximum plot ratio of 30% comprising 15% of the site area;
(iii) may accommodate a retirement facility or a residential care facility in the Emerging community zone where in close proximity to neighbourhood facilities;
(iv) where development is reconfiguring a lot, has a minimum lot size of 450m2 with an average lot size of at least 600m2.
(j) Rural housing areas identified in Figure a comprise dwelling houses on large lots that maintain the semi-rural landscape character of Fig Tree Pocket.
(k) No further subdivision occurs in the rural housing area.
(l) Neighbourhood centres identified in the neighbourhood plan serve the retail, commercial, community and service needs of the local community and Centre activities do not expand outside of these identified sites or other land already included in a zone in the Centre zones category.
(m) Development and site planning on the Fig Tree Pocket Equestrian Federation of Australia leasehold land incorporates:
(i) pedestrian and cyclist linkages with the Montessori School and the neighbourhood centre identified in Figure a in order to form an integrated hub of community activities;
(ii) appropriate measures to manage ecological values of waterways and the Brisbane River;
(iii) integrated access and linkages to adjacent parks and community facilities;
(iv) attention to the landscape character and ecological values of the area;
(v) good design to protect local amenity by managing impacts of traffic and on-site activities.
(n) Any further development of the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary is for wildlife sanctuary activities (including an ancillary uses) and is of a scale and intensity in keeping with the surrounding area.
(o) Activities at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary remain visually unobtrusive from the boundaries of the site and across the Brisbane River.
(p) Development of the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary demonstrates:
(i) design and siting of buildings (other than animal enclosures for the display/holding of animals associated with Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary) that reflects the cultural heritage values of the site including development footprints for existing and proposed structures along with car parking and servicing areas;
(ii) a satisfactory interface with existing and future residential development by managing amenity impacts and providing a buffer zone to adjoining residential land;
(iii) a satisfactory buffer to the Brisbane River and waterways to protect and enhance their ecological values, including provision of public parkland along the full length of the Brisbane River;
(iv) protection and enhancement of the site's ecological values;
(v) management of site wastewater and stormwater run-off including integrated water management and water sensitive urban design techniques.

Note—A comprehensive structure plan prepared in accordance with the Structure planning planning scheme policy may be required to demonstrate achievement of these outcomes. The structure plan should identify enclosures for animal keeping areas indicating existing structure and broad zones where future structures of defined scale and type may be erected without the need for a development application only where in accordance with the structure plan. A vegetation management plan may be requested to demonstrate how the site's ecological values will be protected and enhanced. An environmental management plan may be requested to demonstrate how site wastewater and stormwater are managed.

(q) Pedestrian and cyclist paths provide safe and legible connections between residential areas and key destinations including centres, community facilities, major parks and conservation reserves and public transport nodes.
(r) Development is of a height, scale and form which is consistent with the amenity and character, community expectations and infrastructure assumptions intended for the relevant precinct, sub-precinct or site and is only developed at a greater height, scale and form where there is both a community need and an economic need for the development.

7.2.6.2.3 Performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes

Table 7.2.6.2.3.A—Performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes
Performance outcomes
Acceptable outcomes
General
PO1
Development is of a height, scale and form that achieves the relevant intended outcome for the precinct, improves the amenity of the neighbourhood plan area, contributes to a cohesive streetscape and built form character and is:
(a) consistent with anticipated density and assumed infrastructure demand;
(b) aligned with community expectations about the number of storeys to be built;
(c) proportionate to and commensurate with the utility of the site area and frontage width;
(d) designed to avoid a significant and undue adverse amenity impact to adjoining development;
(e) sited to enable existing and future buildings to be well separated from each other and to avoid affecting the development potential adjoining a site.

Note—Development that exceeds the intended number of storeys or building height can place disproportionate pressure on the transport network, public space or community facilities in particular.

Note—Development that is over-scaled for its site can result in an undesirable dominance of vehicle access, parking and manoeuvring areas that significantly reduce streetscape character and amenity.

AO1
Development complies with the number of storeys and building height in Table 7.2.6.2.3.B.

Note—Neighbourhood plans will mostly specify maximum number of storeys where zone outcomes have been varied in relation to building height. Some neighbourhood plans may also specify height in metres. Development must comply with both parameters where maximum number of storeys and height in metres are specified.

PO2
Development in the road reserve and streetscape reflects the bushland and semi-rural landscape character of Fig Tree Pocket, particularly with regard to:
(a) the design of fencing, vehicular access and driveways;
(b) the design of the carriageway, drainage, footpaths, cycle paths and grass swales;
(c) fencing is low key, not visually prominent and integrates elements of landscape design in the road reserve in accordance with Figure d.
AO2.1
Development has a maximum fence height of 1.5m and is at least 75% transparent where along road alignments.

Note—Acoustic fencing is not required along Fig Tree Pocket Road, Jesmond Road and Gunnin Street.

AO2.2
Development ensures earthworks such as cutting and filling, are minimised by providing horizontal and vertical separation of the road carriageway and footpaths/cycle paths.
AO2.3
Development ensures that for steep slopes identified in Figure b swale drainage, footpaths and cycle paths are graded or constructed independently of the road carriageway.
If in the very low density residential or low density residential potential development areas or the rural housing area
PO3
Development on steep slopes being greater than 1:4 as indicated in Figure b:
(a) does not cause additional erosion, sediment loss or impact on adjacent lands and waterways;
(b) ensures building techniques are sensitive to the ecological values of the site;
(c) ensures retaining wall materials, finishes and landscaping are compatible with the surrounding area.
AO3.1
Development ensures buildings are not located on slopes equal to or greater than 1:3 as indicated in Figure b.
AO3.2
Development ensures cut and fill of slopes less than 1:3 does not exceed 1m above or below existing ground levels.
AO3.3
Development ensures building foundations are of a type that minimise disturbance to the natural landscape, such as pole type foundations.
AO3.4
Development for reconfiguring a lot provides lots 1,000m2 or greater on sites with a slope greater than 1:4 as indicated in Figure b.
If in the very low density residential potential development area
PO4
Development:
(a) maintains ecological features and processes that underpin the biological, social, cultural and economic wellbeing of Fig Tree Pocket and surrounds are protected and managed to ensure their long-term viability;
(b) responds to and retains ecological and bushland landscape character values and results in no net loss of ecological values in the central area indicated in Figure a.
(c) ensures that safety and traffic movement is maintained by restricting vehicular access ways to Fig Tree Pocket Road.

Note—Preparing an environmental management plan to protect ecological values may assist in achieving this performance outcome.

AO4.1
Development of a dwelling house is sited within an approved development footprint plan, or where a development footprint plan does not exist:
(a) has an average plan area of 600m2;
(b) is set back a minimum 6m and average 10m from any road frontage.
Refer to Figure c.
Note—The above development footprint plan requirements are in addition to those in the Subdivision code.
AO4.2
Development if reconfiguring a lot:
(a) ensures the lot configuration and the development footprint plan protects ecologically sensitive areas;
(b) ensures that any vegetation cleared in accordance with a development footprint plan is replaced on other parts of the same site with locally occurring native species, in accordance with the Planting species planning scheme policy.
(c) ensures only 1 shared vehicular access is provided for lots with access to and from Fig Tree Pocket Road.
If in the very low density residential potential development area and with a road frontage to Fig Tree Pocket Road, Jesmond Road, Gunnin Street, Cubberla Street, Thiesfield Street, Kenmore Road, Pylara Street, Terrigal Street or Karella Street
PO5
Development:
(a) minimises disruption to the natural landscape and vegetation on hillsides and adjacent to roads in order to protect bushland landscape character in the area;
(b) responds to site characteristics such as slope, waterways, ecological and landscape character values through the width of setbacks.
AO5.1
Development retains native vegetation in a 10m corridor adjacent to the road.
Refer to Figure f and Figure h.
AO5.2
Development minimises the mass of buildings by varying wall and roof lines.
If in the low density residential potential development area with road frontage to Fig Tree Pocket Road, Jesmond Road, Gunnin Street, Cubberla Street, Thiesfield Street or Ormsby Street
PO6
Development:
(a) maintains the landscape character of the potential development area;
(b) maintains views from district access and suburban routes which are characterised by houses located in a semi-rural setting;
(c) locates building setbacks depending upon site characteristics such as slope, waterways, ecological and landscape character values.
AO6.1
Development retains existing mature native vegetation by providing landscape treatments in a 10m corridor along the road.
AO6.2
Development where for reconfiguring a lot, ensures all lots have a minimum area of 1,000m2 and vehicular accesses/driveways to lots are shared where topography and sequencing of subdivision enables this to occur.

Note—A development footprint plan may be required to implement landscape character treatments in allotments fronting these roads. Buildings and associated structures are set back a minimum 6m and average 10m from the roads listed above.

AO6.3
Development provides landscaping treatment along road frontages in accordance with Figure d, Figure f, Figure g, Figure h, Figure i and Figure j which illustrate appropriate landscape treatments, including:
(a) tree planting at irregular spacing;
(b) grouping or clumping of trees;
(c) occasional views of built form through landscaped areas;
(d) provision of services such as footpaths meandering amongst existing mature vegetation;
(e) use of colours and materials for footpaths and cycle paths sensitive to landscape character.

Note—A landscape concept plan may be required to assist in demonstrating achievement of this acceptable outcome.

If reconfiguring a lot on land in the low density residential potential development area that adjoins the very low density residential potential development area or rural housing area
PO7
Development interface between the low density residential potential development area and the very low density residential potential development area or the rural housing area is transitioned through appropriate allotment sizes and siting of buildings.
AO7
Development has a minimum lot size of 1,000m2.
If for centre activities in an area identified as a neighbourhood centre in Figure a
PO8
Development is located:
(a) at a convenient location on the home-bound trip for residents;
(b) with high levels of accessibility and visibility from a major district or suburban road;
(c) at a central location to areas of significant residential development, ensuring a high level of convenience to the majority of the population;
(d) as close as possible to a range of community facilities.
AO8.1
Development in the centre is located on the area noted as neighbourhood centre identified in Figure a and is within 500m of the low density residential potential development area accessible by footpath or cycle path.
AO8.2
Development in the neighbourhood centre is designed to address all street frontages and evoke a contemporary active frontage – primary character with some shops located close to street frontages.
AO8.3
Development provides an attractive and useable semi-public open space with a minimum area of 200m2.
PO9
Development is consistent with the size of the neighbourhood centre which reflects the anticipated size of the future local population.
AO9
Development in the neighbourhood centre has a maximum gross floor area of 600m2 and a building height of 1 storey.
PO10
Development:
(a) reflects the particular landscape and built form character of the Fig Tree Pocket area and is in keeping with the low density residential nature of the area;
(b) ensures the location of parking and entrances maintains safety for pedestrians, motorists and cyclists.
AO10.1
Development which includes buildings is set back 6m to 12m from the street.
AO10.2
Development has car parking that is visible from the street, but does not dominate the presentation of the centre.
Table 7.2.6.2.3.B—Maximum building height
Development
Building height (number of storeys)
If in the area identified as neighbourhood centre in Figure a
Development of a site for centre activities
1

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View the high resolution of Figure a–Potential development areas, centres and rural housing (PDF file size is 324Kb)

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View the high resolution of Figure b–Steep slopes (PDF file size is 324Kb)

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