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Chapter 9 Public utilities

Contents

9.1 Introduction

9.2 General requirements

9.3 Street lighting

9.4 Electricity

9.5 Telecommunications

9.6 Council community services conduits

9.7 Traffic signals

9.1 Introduction

(1) Development provides utility services that:
(a) operate safely and efficiently;
(b) perform to the required standard of service appropriate for the area;
(c) meet the future servicing requirements for the use.
(2) This chapter outlines the following for the provision of traffic signals, street lighting, electricity, gas and telecommunications infrastructure:
(a) design and construction standards;
(b) advice about satisfying assessment criteria in the planning scheme.

9.2 General requirements

Editor’s note—For information on the approval process, refer to the Infrastructure and Construction Requirements Manual.

The applicant is responsible for:

(a) design, delivery and installation (including costs) of public utility services;
(b) the costs of alterations to existing public utility services;
(c) the relocation of services to the correct alignment within the verge if a road widening is required along the frontage of the development;
(d) services if they need to be lowered to provide sufficient cover when the footpath is re-graded to the design profile;
(e) services if they need to be raised if filling raises the level of the verge;
(f) consulting with the relevant authority when services are altered or relocated.

9.3 Street lighting

9.3.1 Scope

Street lighting is provided in the following locations and circumstances:

(a) for a new public street (including laneways);
(b) on any road frontage to the development;
(c) on any road construction required outside the limits of the development;
(d) if existing street lighting installation is modified.

9.3.2 Design specifications and guidelines

(1) Unless specified otherwise in this chapter, the provision and detailed design of street-lighting installations must conform to the following:
(a) installed as Rate 2 (Contributed) lighting;
(b) AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010 Lighting for roads and public spaces Set;
(c) Energex policies and standard work practices.
(2) The nominal lighting categories are specified in Table 9.3.2.A.
(3) The standards in Table 2.1 to Table 2.5 in AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010 Lighting for roads and public spaces Set may dictate a more stringent lighting category for a particular development.
(4) The lighting categories referred to in AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010 Lighting for roads and public spaces Set are broadly described as follows:
(a) Category V lighting – lighting which is applicable to roads on which the visual requirements of motorists are dominant (e.g. on traffic routes);
(b) Category P lighting – lighting which is applicable to roads on which the visual requirements of pedestrians are dominant (e.g. on local roads, pathways and bikeways) and is also applicable to outdoor public areas such as outdoor shopping precincts, car parks and stairs.
(5) BSD-11001–BSD-11003 show lighting requirements for suburban centre improvement projects.
(6) BSD-11031–BSD-11032 show lighting requirements for bikeways.
(7) Department of Transport and Main Roads standards are provided in:
(a) MRTS 91_Conduits and Pits;
(b) MRTS 92_Road Lighting Footings;
(c) MRTS 94_Road Lighting;
(d) MRTS 95_Switchboards and Cables;
(e) Traffic and Road Use Management Manual (Volume 5—Intelligent Transport Systems and Electrical Technology).
(8) The street-lighting category for any street or road can be varied in consideration of special circumstances or when additional lighting is required in the following situations:
(a) intersections;
(b) roundabouts;
(c) sharp bends;
(d) speed control devices (including local area traffic management devices);
(e) pedestrian crossings;
(f) cul-de-sacs;
(g) bridges and culverts;
(h) night-time accident locations;
(i) frequently used night-time bus stops;
(j) areas that may generate pedestrian traffic or vehicle night traffic.
Table 9.3.2.A—Lighting categories
Road type
AS/NZS 1158 lighting category
Description
Minimum reserve width
for new construction
Local road
14m
P5
Local road where a laneway
N/A
P5
Neighbourhood road (non-bus route)
16m
P5/P4
Neighbourhood road (bus route)
19.5m
P4
District road
19.5m–24m
V5
Suburban road
33m–38m
V5
Arterial road
40m–45m
V3
Pathway
N/A
P5
Cycleway
N/A
P3/P4

Note—Lighting on a traffic route through or adjacent to industrial areas must comply with the relevant Category V.

9.3.3 Detail

9.3.3.1 Costs

(1) Where the proposed street lighting equipment deviates from Council standards outlined in this chapter and the Streetscape Design Guidelines, the developer is responsible for any additional life-cycle costs that may be incurred by Council. Any deviation from Council standards must be limited to centre activities.
(2) An electrical engineering consultant must submit life-cycle cost comparisons to Council for assessment. The comparison of costs between standard lighting and proposed non-standard lighting must evaluate the life-cycle costs of a design based on standard lighting and the proposed design utilising non-standard lighting. The net present values of capital and operating costs must be calculated over a 50-year life cycle based on the following parameters:
(a) acquisition cost and the equipment replacement at the end of useful life – manufacturer’s guarantee period or other period deemed appropriate by Council (Energex and Brisbane City Council are responsible for replacement costs under Rate 2 and Rate 3 tariffs respectively.);
(b) installation costs (Current materials and labour rates must be used.);
(c) equipment repair due to damage and preventative maintenance – Where Brisbane City Council is liable for repair costs under Rate 3 tariff, Council will supply data on the frequency of replacement and associated unit rates. Energex is responsible for repair costs under Rate 2;
(d) discount rate – the latest 10-year Commonwealth Treasury bond rate as published by the Reserve Bank of Australia. Sensitivity analyses are also required for the 10-year bond rate ± 2%;
(e) inflation – long-term inflation target set by the Reserve Bank of Australia;
(f) ongoing energy (and maintenance if applicable) costs – as detailed in the tariff schedule gazetted by the Queensland Government.

Note—The proponent is responsible for all capital costs associated with the design and installation of any street lighting, and any ‘loss of asset charges’ required by Energex for removal or relocation of existing street-lighting equipment.

9.3.3.2 Underground electricity services

Underground electricity services are provided for all new street lighting unless a new light is attached to an existing electricity distribution pole.

9.3.3.3 Partial road construction

If development includes partial road construction (typically when the development adjoins an undeveloped site), lighting is designed for the ultimate road width.

9.3.3.4 Frangible-type poles

(1) Street-light poles are not installed in locations where they are vulnerable to damage from vehicles (such as in narrow medians).
(2) If installation in a vulnerable location is unavoidable, suitable protection is provided to minimise the risk of injury, or frangible/slip-base type is used.
(3) Slip-base poles are only used where there is no possibility of a secondary accident.

9.3.3.5 Pedestrian facilities

(1) Lighting for pedestrian underpasses requires special consideration, and Council should be contacted for site-specific requirements.
(2) Lighting at a pedestrian zebra crossing complies with AS/NZS 1158.4: Lighting for roads and public spaces.
(3) If a crossing is located in a P category road, the requirement for 3 spans of Category V lighting on each approach does not apply.

9.3.3.6 Rural and environmental protection areas

(1) Lighting design and all associated conduit installations are installed based on an average of 1 light per 5 lots (typically the road frontage of each lot in these areas exceeds 50m).
(2) Flag lighting is provided on intersections and tight bends for rural or otherwise unlit roads.

9.3.3.7 Footpath awning

(1) A pedestrian lighting system meets the requirements of AS/NZS 1158.3.1 Lighting subcategory P6 and AS 4282 Table 2.1.
(2) The ongoing operating and maintenance costs are borne by the building owner.
(3) Lights under awnings operate from dusk until dawn.

9.3.3.8 Outreach

The outreach is orientated at right angles to the adjacent kerb, edge of bitumen or footpath.

9.3.3.9 Maintenance factor

The maintenance factor used in lighting design calculations is 0.7 to maintain consistency with street-light maintenance method used by Energex (spot replacement).

9.3.3.10 Tight bends

(1) Lighting near sharp bends and intersections requires special consideration.
(2) Figure 3.1 in AS/NZS 1158.3.1: Lighting for roads and public spaces – Pedestrian area (Category P) lighting – Performance and design requirements shows lighting design for sharp bends and intersections. Examples are shown in Figure 9.3.3.10a.
(3) Sharps bends (i.e. bends between approximately 70° to 90°) are treated similarly to T-intersections.
(4) If the light in the 10m zone shown in Figure 9.3.3.10a is nominally at right angles to the adjacent light, spacing must not exceed 0.5s.
(5) If light is located part way around the bend (in the 10m zone shown in Figure 9.3.3.10a) and at angle of approximately 45° to the adjacent lights, spacing must not exceed 0.75s.

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9.3.4 Equipment

9.3.4.1 Standard stock items

(1) In accordance with the current equipment available from Energex, 32 W compact fluorescent luminaires are generally used on Category P5 roads and high pressure sodium or mercury vapour luminaires along P4 Category and V Category roads.
(2) The luminaire support pole must be the base plate mounted steel type unless fitting new lights to existing timber poles.
(3) Typical pole/outreach/luminaire combinations that are acceptable to Council are shown in Table 9.3.4.1.A.
(4) If development extends an existing street, new poles/lights must match the existing types to the maximum practicable extent, unless the existing street contains the superseded built in ground poles or galvanised iron poles with fluorescent luminaires.
(5) In the case of galvanised iron poles, the spacing of lights must take into account the future replacement and re-spacing of the galvanised iron poles with modern equipment by Council.
(6) Council is currently phasing out Mercury Vapour lamps.
Table 9.3.4.1.A—Pole/outreach/luminaire/combinations
Luminaire
Pole length
(out of ground)
Horizontal outreach size
Mounting height
M50
4.5m
1.5m(1)
6.5m
M50 Nostalgia
4.5m (Estate)
Curved
5.1m
M80
4.5m
1.5m(1)
6.5m
M80 Nostalgia
4.5m (Estate)
Curved
5.1m
S70 Nostalgia
4.5m (Estate)
Curved
5.1m
S70
5.5m
1.5m
7.5m
S100
7m
1.5m
9m
S150
7m
1.5m
9m
S150
8.5m
3m
10.5m
S250
8.5m
3m
10.5m

Note–

(1) Outreach has an inbuilt 2m uplift.

9.3.4.2 Non-standard equipment item

(1) Light Emitting Diodes (LED) lights should also be considered for use on Council lights.

9.3.4.3 Aeroscreen luminaires for laneways

(1) Aeroscreen luminaires are not generally used, except for pedestrian laneways or in the vicinity of airports where they are a statutory requirement.
(2) An aeroscreen luminaire on a 5m base plate mounted hinged pole fitted with a 0.5m bracket must be used for pedestrian laneways.
(3) The light should generally be located midway along the pedestrian laneway at abutting property boundaries.
(4) If the laneway exceeds 60m in length, more than 1 light is required.

9.3.4.4 Decorative lighting

(1) Decorative lighting cannot be used on Category V roads as the primary method to illuminate the roadway.
(2) Council will not accept any decorative light or supporting pole for lighting public roads and laneways unless it is a current standard stock item of Energex (i.e. available under Rate 2).
(3) If the development is an extension of an existing estate already installed with decorative lighting units, then the new development must match the existing units.

9.3.4.5 Tree locations

(1) New light poles must not be positioned closer than 7m to any street tree.
(2) Trees shall not be planted closer than 7m to an existing light pole.

9.3.5 Alignment

(1) To achieve a balanced streetscape, it is preferred that lights are installed alternately on the opposite sides of the street (staggered arrangement).
(2) Centre medium lighting is acceptable where the lighting will comply with AS/NZS 1158: Lighting for roads and public spaces and Energex requirements.
(3) Installation of lights on one side of the street only (single-sided arrangement) is unacceptable unless this is on a temporary basis or the existing lighting in the street is single sided.
(4) The location of light poles must:
(a) avoid the likely vehicle conflict points;
(b) minimise the risk of damage to both poles and vehicles, and injury to vehicle occupants;
(c) minimise glare complaints;
(d) minimise conflicting driveway locations.
(5) The following factors are considered when determining the street lighting alignment:
(a) street light poles are located in line with abutting property boundaries or on truncation points at intersections, with a potential exception to traffic routes where spacings of lights are maximised or V Category roads due to smaller design spacings (ensure poles are clear of future driveways);
(b) a 10% increase in the design spacing is acceptable for 2 consecutive spans only;
(c) in cul-de-sac locations, the alignment is measured along a radius line relative to and taken from the property frontage and then projected to the centre point of the cul-de-sac;
(d) lighting poles are located sufficiently clear of existing features;
(e) a 1.2m clearance is required from the edge of driveways and bikeways;
(f) poles in cul-de-sac locations are not located adjacent to or in front of narrow property frontages;
(g) lighting poles in new roads are located in accordance with the relevant BSD-1013, BSD-1014, BSD-1015 or BCD-1016;
(h) poles in existing roads match the original road alignment, unless road widening is proposed;
(i) where the verge (footpath) width exceeds 4.75m, the centre of the street lighting pole is located no more than 0.8m behind the nominal face of the kerb or 0.98m behind the kerb invert (the distance between the nominal face and invert for a Type D kerb and channel or Type D kerb is 180mm);
(j) in subdivisions designed to AMCORD specifications where the ‘common trench’ arrangements are applicable, lighting poles are permitted to be 0.7m behind the nominal kerb face;
(k) a light pole is located on the approach side of each intersecting street at a small roundabout;
(l) poles must not be located in the central median island of a roundabout as this area is often landscaped thus impeding maintenance access;
(m) on larger roundabouts, Council will only accept the installation of central island lights if a single pole is used and is of the cantilever (pivot arm) type. In this instance, it is necessary to confirm with Energex that maintenance of the lights is not an issue.

9.3.6 Lighting of local area traffic management devices

The lighting standard for local area traffic management devices is as follows:
(a) lighting of the installation is in accordance with AS 1158.3.1: Pedestrian area (Category P) lighting; or
(b) a luminaire is installed at each device, preferably on existing poles which are suitably located; or
(c) luminaires are installed at either side of the device, preferably on existing poles which are suitably located;
(d) the desirable minimum average horizontal illuminance at noses of traffic calming devices complies with Category P lighting.

Note—Luminaires are selected on the basis of road use and device type.

Note—Consideration should be given to using aeroscreen luminaires, to reduce spill lighting into residential properties.

Note—Lighting is installed under Rate 2 conditions unless Energex is unable to complete their maintenance requirements or a lighting circuit switch is installed in which case provision must be made for either Rate 3 or a metered supply.

9.3.7 Lighting of Schoolsafe projects

The lighting standard for Schoolsafe facilities is in accordance with urban amenity as follows:
(a) where the facility is a widening of the existing road pavement, then the lighting standard applicable to that road be applied in accordance with AS 1158.3.1 Pedestrian area (Category P lighting);
(b) where the facility is in a separate area to the adjacent street, is dedicated as road and has a higher than normal night-time usage, the lighting standard applicable to that car parking areas complies with AS 1158.3.1: Pedestrian area (Category P lighting).

Note—Preference should be given to using semi cut-off luminaries – this is to reduce the spill lighting into residential properties (Lighting Category P11/12).

Note—Disabled car parks should be located as near as possible to proposed luminaries, and in the case of buildings, disabled car parks must also be located as near as possible to the entrance.

Note—Lighting to be installed under Rate 2 conditions unless 1 or more of the following criteria is met, then provision should be made for either Rate 3 or a metered supply:

9.4 Electricity

9.4.1 General

(1) Full underground electricity reticulation, including the installation of underground electricity supply pillars, must be provided within the new dedicated road reserve to all lots including any adjacent parkland.
(2) An underground electricity supply pillar of adequate power capacity must be provided on at least 1 park frontage near an entrance to cater for future embellishment of the park, which may include internal park lighting and other electrical park equipment.
(3) In established areas, overhead electricity supply can continue to service the development provided that there are no new poles within the road reserve (additional property poles located within private property are acceptable) nor any extension to the overhead mains.
(4) Where 2 or more rear lots are created underground, electricity service pillars located in the road reserve service the development.

Editor’s note—For information on the approval process, refer to Infrastructure Installation and Construction Requirements Manual.

9.4.2 Electricity conduits

(1) Conduits are installed (quantity, size and placement of the necessary conduits to be nominated by the electrical distribution entity) in the following locations:
(a) designated electricity corridor along the verge, which generally applies to a subdivision where there is dedication and opening of a road;
(b) full length of any rear allotment access or access easement (preferably before any concrete driveway is installed) to cater for the proposed future low voltage consumer’s mains. This requirement generally applies to a subdivision in an established area.
(2) Where required, the developer must install future use conduits if this is a design parameter set by the electricity supplier.

9.4.3 High voltage feeders

All existing transmission lines of 33kV or above may remain overhead. However, if the applicant wishes to remove high voltage feeder lines, the necessary approvals must be obtained direct from Energex. New or relocated high voltage systems may be overhead at the discretion of Energex.

9.4.4 Transformers

(1) All new transformers required for a development within an existing underground area or an underground reticulated subdivision are the pad mounted transformer (PMT) type even if their location is remote from the development.
(2) The erection of new pole transformers (PT) will only be considered provided that there are no new poles, nor any extension to the overhead mains.
(3) Where a pole transformer is proposed in an established area, the developer is to consult with the residents within the neighbourhood to ensure acceptance of the proposal by the community.
(4) The erection of a new pole transformer is generally limited to small or staged developments.
(5) Upgrading of an existing pole transformer is allowed (and possible pole replacement), provided that it is not sited at a different location.

9.4.5 Gas

If underground gas is to be supplied to the new development, these service conduits must be shown on the engineering drawings.

9.5 Telecommunications

9.5.1 Options

(1) If the chosen wholesale carrier does not need ownership of the telecommunications conduits or will share space in them with Council, and Council approves, the requirement for separate community services conduits (if any) may be waived.
(2) New conduits may not be needed if the carrier acknowledges that there is no need for additional conduits to meet sub-section (1) in in-fill developments, or in locations where the chosen carrier has access to existing underground conduits.

Editor’s note—For information on the approval process, refer to Infrastructure Installation and Construction Requirements Manual.

9.5.2 Telecommunications conduits and pits

9.5.2.1 Minimum specifications

If the Commonwealth Telecommunication Act 1997, Federal National Broadband Network regulations or the chosen carrier has additional requirements or different specifications, these minimum specifications must still be met.

9.5.2.2 Conduits

(1) Every allotment is serviced by the carrier, and 1 x 100mm diameter conduit (UPVC Class PN9, white, in compliance with AS/NZS 1477:2006 PVC pipes and fittings for pressure applications) is installed on at least 1 side of streets fronted by and within the development.
(2) If the 100mm conduit is installed on 1 side, a conduit at least 50mm in diameter (UPVC Class PN12, white, in compliance with AS/NZS 1477:2006 PVC pipes and fittings for pressure applications) is installed across the streets where necessary to serve allotments on the other side.

9.5.2.3 Pits

(1) The 100mm underground telecommunications conduit network connects to accessible pits (minimum size, Type 4 as per BSD-1011) with lids as per BSD-1012 so that there is a pit outside every allotment.
(2) A pit can typically be located near every second allotment boundary.
(3) Pits on the end of 50mm lateral road crossing conduits must be of a minimum size, Type 2 as per BSD-1011 with lids as per BSD-1012.
(4) The name or logo on the pit lids must identify the final owner.

9.5.2.4 Pit locations

(1) Pits must not be placed in areas subject to vehicular traffic.
(2) If there is a reasonable chance vehicles may drive on the pit, or if the pit is on a fully paved verge, steel lids are used.

9.5.2.5 Pits for public locations

The intersections of major roads and entrances to parks have at least 1 accessible pit connected to the telecommunications conduit network.

9.5.2.6 Pit entry

(1) All conduits enter into the ends of the pits only, at least 25mm above the pit floor.
(2) Bushes are installed on all pit entries to prevent soil entering the pit.

9.5.2.7 Conduit bends

(1) Conduit bends with a minimum radius of 3m must be used on 100mm conduits where necessary to ensure that they enter into the pit ends.
(2) The lateral (road crossing) conduits which are typically 50mm diameter must have conduit bends with a minimum of 800mm bend radius at each end.
(3) Property ‘starter’ pipes must have a minimum bend radius of 300mm.
(4) The locations of pits and bends for lateral crossings and starters are specified in BSD-1013 and BSD-1015.

9.5.2.8 Shared trench in the power alignment

(1) In new ‘greenfield’ developments, the conduits may be installed in a shared trench with the electricity conduits.
(2) If using shared trenches, the developer is to install the telecommunications conduit according to the separation dimensions and protection devices specified by the electricity authority.
(3) If necessary, the telecommunications conduit may need to divert their alignment for a short distance so the pits do not intrude into the separation spaces around the electricity facilities.

9.5.2.9 Depths, alignments and locations

The depths, alignments and bend locations must meet the minimum requirements in BSD-1013 – BSD-1016.

9.5.2.10 Testing and draw line

All conduits are to be tested by passing a mandrel at least 80% of the conduit’s nominal internal diameter through the conduit, and a durable draw line strong enough and suitable to pull in a cable hauling line is to be securely left in place.

9.6 Council community services conduits

Editor’s note—For further information refer to Infrastructure Installation and Construction Requirements Manual.

9.6.1 General

(1) Community services conduits and pits are provided in favour of Council in neighbourhood access (bus route) streets and higher order streets in the Council road hierarchy.
(2) Additional route(s) must have a community services conduit installed if they are nominated as a specific condition of development.
(3) The developer is permitted to install community services conduits in the same excavations made for telecommunications and electricity services where this is possible.

9.6.2 Options

Section 9.6 is to be read in conjunction with the other sections of this planning scheme policy involving conduits including matters in relation to the following:

(a) telecommunications conduits and pits;
(b) traffic signal communications conduits and pits;
(c) traffic signal intersection conduits and pits.

9.6.3 Conduits

(1) The developer is to install 1 x 100mm diameter conduit (UPVC Class PN9, white, in compliance with AS/NZS 1477:2006 PVC pipes and fittings for pressure applications) on streets fronting, or within, the development where these streets are neighbourhood road (bus route) and higher order streets in the road hierarchy.
(2) The community services communications conduits for Council need only be installed on 1 side of the specified streets and, unlike the telecommunications conduits; there is no requirement for lateral street crossings or property connections.

9.6.4 Pits

(1) Pits (Type 3 as per BSD-1011) are installed at the ‘dead ends’ of the Council community services conduit, on both sides of where the conduit crosses roads, at park entrances and any other locations specified as a specific condition of development.
(2) The pit lids are as per BSD-1012 with the ‘Communications’ label.

9.6.5 Pit locations

(1) Pits are not placed in areas subject to vehicular traffic.
(2) If there is a reasonable chance of vehicles occasionally driving on the pit, or if the pit is on a fully paved verge, steel lids are used.

9.6.6 Pit entry

(1) Conduits must enter the ends of pits only, at least 25mm above the pit floor.
(2) Conduit bends with a minimum radius of 3m are used where necessary to ensure that the conduits always enter into the pit ends.
(3) Bushes are installed on all pit entries to prevent soil entering the pit.
(4) All community services conduits are to be plugged at every pit to prevent water and soil ingress.

9.6.7 No connection with telecommunications conduits

The dedicated community services conduit for Council is to bypass all telecommunications service pits.

9.6.8 Shared trench in the power alignment

In new ‘greenfield’ developments, the community services conduit can be installed in the electricity alignment in a shared trench with the electricity conduits, with separation and protection as specified by the relevant electricity provider.

9.6.9 Depths, alignments and locations

The depths and alignments are to meet the minimum requirements in the BSD-1013 – BSD-1016.

9.6.10 Testing and draw line

All conduits are to be tested by passing a mandrel at least 80% of the conduit’s nominal internal diameter through the conduit, and a durable draw line strong enough and suitable to pull in cable hauling line is to be securely left in place.

9.7 Traffic signals

9.7.1 Traffic signal engineering consultant

The design of a traffic signal installation must be undertaken by an appropriately qualified and competent Registered Professional Engineer Queensland who has relevant experience in signal design.

9.7.2 Design specifications and guidelines

9.7.2.1 Design – general

(1) Compliance with the statutes and regulations applicable for road use in Queensland is mandatory.
(2) The following documents are to be used to design traffic signals:
(a) standard drawings (BSD-1000 series);
(b) Manual of uniform traffic control devices (Queensland);
(c) Department of Transport and Main Roads standards and specifications MRS 11.01 – MRS 11.95;
(d) Austroads standards;
(e) Australian Standards.
(3) Standard drawings (BSD-1000 series) and reference specifications take precedence over Department of Transport and Main Roads standards.

9.7.2.2 Equipment

Traffic signal components included in a traffic signal design are to comply with all the relevant Australian Standards.

9.7.3 Traffic signal communications conduits

9.7.3.1 Requirements

(1) All new traffic signal intersection controllers are to be connected to each other and to the nearest existing Council traffic signal intersection, or the nearest splice point in an existing Council traffic signal optic fibre cable, via traffic signal communications conduits and new optic fibre cable.
(2) Where necessary, the developer is to extend the traffic signal communications conduits up to 300m beyond the boundary of the development.
(3) If there is no existing Council traffic signal intersection or splice point in an existing Council traffic signal optic fibre cable within 300m of the development, the applicant is to consult Council.

9.7.3.2 Conduits

(1) The developer is to install 1 x 100mm diameter conduit (UPVC Class PN9, white, in compliance with AS/NZS 1477:2006 PVC pipes and fittings for pressure applications) from the communications pit at the controller to the communications pit at the controller of the next traffic signal intersection or pit where the nominated connection will be made, as per the requirements above.
(2) The (electrical) traffic signal intersection conduits can be used for optical fibre traffic signal communications cables.
(3) There is no need to duplicate traffic signal communications conduits in places where (electrical) traffic signal intersection conduits are being installed.

9.7.3.3 Intermediate pits

(1) Pits (Type 4 as per BSD-1011) are installed:
(a) on both sides of where conduits cross roads;
(b) at intermediate locations such that the total of the bends between pits does not exceed 180 degrees;
(c) at intervals such that the length between pits is no greater than 250m.
(2) The pit lids comply with BSD-1012 and are labelled ‘Communications’.

9.7.3.4 Pit locations

(1) Pits are not placed in areas subject to vehicular traffic.
(2) If there is a reasonable chance of vehicles occasionally driving on the pit, or if the pit is on a fully paved verge, steel lids are used.

9.7.3.5 Pit entry

(1) Conduits can only enter the ends of pits, at least 25mm above the pit floor.
(2) Conduit bends with a minimum radius of 3m are used where necessary to ensure that the conduits always enter into the pit ends.
(3) Bushes are installed on the conduits at all pit entries to prevent soil entering the pit.
(4) All traffic signal communications conduits are plugged at every pit to prevent water and soil ingress.

9.7.3.6 Connection with community services conduits

The traffic signal communications conduits connect to the community services conduits where they intersect or come within 20m, by bringing the community services conduit into the closest traffic signal communications pit.

9.7.3.7 Shared trench in the power alignment

In new ‘greenfield’ developments, the traffic signal communications conduits are installed in the electricity alignment in a shared trench with the electricity conduits, with separation and protection as specified by the electricity authority.

9.7.3.8 Depths, alignments and locations

The depths and alignments meet the minimum requirements in BSD-1013 – BSD-1016.

9.7.3.9 Testing and draw line

All conduits are to be tested by passing a mandrel at least 80% of the conduit’s nominal internal diameter through the conduit, and a durable draw line strong enough and suitable to pull in cable hauling line is to be securely left in place.

9.7.4 Traffic signal intersection electrical conduits

Editor’s note—For further information on the requirements refer to Infrastructure Installation and Construction Requirements Manual.

9.7.4.1 Conduits

(1) Conduits are for electrical connections and are orange in colour.
(2) The conduit system is to be Category A according to AS/NZS 3000:2007 Electrical installations and installed as specified in the BSD-4000 series traffic signals drawings.

9.7.4.2 Pit lids

Pit lids comply with BSD-1012 and are labelled ‘Traffic Signal’.

9.7.4.3 Pit locations

(1) Pits are not placed in areas subject to vehicular traffic.
(2) If there is a reasonable chance of vehicles occasionally driving on the pit, or if the pit is on a fully paved verge, steel lids are used.

9.7.4.4 Pit entry

(1) Conduits are to enter the ends of pits, at least 25mm above the pit floor.
(2) Bushes are installed on the conduits at all pit entries to prevent soil entering the pit.
(3) Unused traffic signal intersection conduits are plugged at every pit to prevent water and soil ingress.
(4) Any conduit bend has a minimum bend radius of 800mm.

9.7.4.5 Connection with traffic signal communications conduits

(1) The traffic signal intersection (orange) conduits can be used for optical fibre traffic signal communications cables.
(2) The traffic signal communications (white) conduits can connect into traffic signal pits where needed.

9.7.4.6 Testing and draw line

All conduits are to be tested by passing a mandrel at least 80% of the conduit’s nominal internal diameter through the conduit, and a durable draw line strong enough and suitable to pull in cable hauling line is to be securely left in place.

9.7.5 Traffic signal optic fibre cable

9.7.5.1 Requirements

(1) All new traffic signal intersection controllers are to be connected to each other and to the nearest existing Council traffic signal intersection, or the nearest splice point in an existing Council traffic signal optic fibre cable, via new traffic signal optic fibre cable.
(2) Where necessary, the applicant is to extend the traffic signal optic fibre cable up to 300m beyond the boundary of the development.
(3) The traffic signal optic fibre cable can be installed in traffic signal communications conduits and traffic signal intersection conduits.
(4) This section is subject to the overall approval requirements for traffic signals.

9.7.5.2 Cable construction

(1) The traffic signal optic fibre cable has the following construction:
(a) no metal in the construction of the fibre optic cable;
(b) single mode;
(c) loose tube;
(d) outer jacket of nylon construction (bonded to PE);
(e) polyethylene outer sheath (under the Nylon outer);
(f) water-swellable tape surrounding fibre tubes and fillers;
(g) solid PE fillers;
(h) 12 fibres per gel-filled tube;
(i) GRP central strength member;
(j) UT-T G652.d fibre cores.
(2) If the cable is exclusively for connecting a variable message sign or a traffic CCTV camera to the intersection, a ‘MIL-SPEC’ type tight buffered design may be applicable and the Council intelligent transport systems group is to be consulted.

9.7.5.3 Cable core counts

(1) The cable is considered a backbone cable if it is along a major road corridor between major Council points-of-presence or on a route that the Council signals management group designates to become a backbone route.
(2) The backbone cables have 144 cores.
(3) Cables that branch off from backbone cables to a traffic signal, or connect between traffic signals and not on a backbone route, have a minimum of 48 cores.
(4) The controller cabinet lead-in cable has a minimum of 24 cores.
(5) Where it is reasonable to do so, a joint is installed in the loose tube cable in a pit at the intersection, and a six-core pre-terminated cable will be installed from the joint to the controller cabinet.
(6) In installations, where it has been agreed that it is not feasible to accommodate a joint at or near the intersection (such as in the central business district), using a Council’s signals-management-group-approved fibre optic break out tray (FOBOT) that can accommodate splices within the controller cabinet is allowed, and the controller cabinets can be connected directly using 12- or 24-core loose tube cable.
(7) For isolated devices that require a dedicated fibre lead-in such as camera poles, a joint must be placed at or near the device and a two- to six-core pre-terminated ‘MIL-SPEC’ - type cable must be installed from the joint to the device enclosure or junction box.

9.7.5.4 Fibre cable installation

(1) Fibre optic cables are installed within a cable pathway which may consist of a pit and conduit network which belongs to Council, or which Council can readily access with little or no difficulty, and does not incur any ongoing access charge.
(2) Hauling cable uses suitable installation equipment such as cable guides and support wheels.
(3) Conduits are clean and free of burrs and obstructions.
(4) The cables are installed to ensure that:
(a) the maximum allowable hauling tension is not exceeded;
(b) the allowable minimum bending radius of the cable is not exceeded;
(c) maximum allowable crush is not exceeded;
(d) any unterminated cables must be left sealed to prevent water ingress.

9.7.5.5 Spare cable for loops and joints

(1) Loops of at least 30m of spare cable are stored within Council pits at an interval of every 250m and at every major change of direction or point of intersection, to allow for maintenance and future connections.
(2) Where joints are installed, a 30m loop of cable is provided to allow sufficient movement for installation and maintenance.
(3) When planning cable installations, an additional 10% of overall length is specified as a contingency.
(4) Other considerations when planning for the installation of joints include:
(a) the ability to maintain the infrastructure in the long term;
(b) the safety of those working on joints in the future by ensuring that a suitable site is available for safe network maintenance.

9.7.5.6 Connection to the existing network

Where interfacing to the existing network assets, the Council’s signals management group is to be consulted in the planning and design phase to ensure co-ordination of change management and to minimise risks of unplanned outages for Council.

9.7.5.7 Splicing and termination

(1) All outside plant cables that are terminated for patching are to use green SC/APC style (8°) connectors and green through-connect couplers.
(2) All installed fibre optic cable must be terminated using pigtails and also be fusion spliced using a core alignment fusion splicer, with each splice not having losses greater than 0.1dB.
(3) All pigtails and patch leads are factory manufactured.
(4) All pigtails, patch cords and connectors meet the following specifications:
(a) machine polished ferrules;
(b) insertion loss of 0.25db or less on all SC/APC;
(c) return loss of 60db or greater for SC/APC.
(5) All single-mode pigtails, patch cords and connectors comply with Telcordia standards GR-326 for telecommunications grade networks.
(6) To ensure ferrule end faces meet the geometry requirements for minimum insertion loss, interferometer end face geometry testing is to be conducted, with test reports provided to ensure compliance of the vendor.

9.7.5.8 Underground splice enclosure selection

(1) To ensure uniformity across Council’s fibre network, where cables are jointed within the underground pit system they are:
(a) 48 core or less the preferred jointing enclosure is similar to TYCO FOSC;
(b) greater than 48 core, the preferred jointing enclosure is similar to TYCO FIST.
(2) Where the cable described as ‘MILSPEC’ type is used for a new intersection, no jointing is allowed.
(3) The cable terminates within a local controller, device or mux cabinet.
(4) When a joint is installed at an intermediate point along the cable to break out particular fibre cores for use from within a loose tube, the remaining tubes are looped through the enclosure in-tact (express joint) wherever possible.

9.7.5.9 Controller and MUX cabinet terminations

(1) Where a cable is terminated within a ‘top hat’ extension of a traffic controller or MUX cabinet, the termination enclosure (FOBOT) is similar to a Tyco Electronics FibreNet RTC1G-0-xx-FS xRU
(2) Cables must be secured so that they do not move when the FOBOT is opened.
(3) Where a ‘top hat’ extension is not proposed, Council’s signals management group is to be consulted to confirm the correct termination device.

9.7.5.10 Communications hut terminations

(1) Where a cable is terminated within a communication hut and where a GR2 Rack pre-exists, the termination enclosure (FOBOT) must be similar to a Tyco Electronics GPS2-M.
(2) If a GPS2-M rack does not pre-exist, Council’s signals management group is to be consulted.
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