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Chapter 2 Transport network

Contents

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Road hierarchy

2.3 Freight network

2.4 Bicycle network

2.5 Streetscape hierarchy

2.1 Introduction

(1) This chapter contains advice about satisfying assessment benchmarks in the planning scheme that relate to Brisbane’s transport network, which comprises the following:
(a) a road hierarchy;
(b) a freight network;
(c) a bicycle network;
(d) a streetscape network.
(2) The design and construction standards for the transport network are detailed in Chapter 3, Chapter 4, Chapter 5 and Chapter 12 (in relation to Riverwalk facilities) of this planning scheme policy.
(3) The features and the function of the transport network and each element are described.
(4) Roads provide the following functions which are important in the transport network:
(a) roads are the primary routes in which people and goods move around Brisbane;
(b) roads provide the infrastructure to move people including those walking, cycling, travelling in a bus and driving;
(c) roads are an important part of the public domain providing social, economic and environmental functions;
(d) roads are designed to accommodate all road users, however in some instances the priority may vary depending upon its role in the overall transport network.

2.2 Road hierarchy

2.2.1 General

(1) The purpose of the road network is to:
(a) provide for the safe and efficient movement of goods and people;
(b) provide strong connections between the main economic hubs of the city;
(c) accommodate the needs of all modes of transport that use roads including public transport, pedestrians, cyclists, freight vehicles and motorised vehicles;
(d) find a balance to the often competing requirements for the use of the city’s roads;
(e) contribute to the identity and character of the city by providing public space, streetscape and buffers between traffic and adjacent activities;
(f) provide corridors for utilities such as water, wastewater, electricity, gas and telecommunications.
(2) The road network includes the following classifications, as shown in Figure 2.5.2.a:
(a) motorway;
(b) arterial road;
(c) suburban road;
(d) district road;
(e) neighbourhood road;
(f) local road.
(3) All roads are categorised as major roads or minor roads (see section 2.2.4).

2.2.2 Major roads

(1) A major road provides for through-traffic movements for pedestrians, cyclists, public transport, freight and private vehicles connecting suburbs, major destinations and areas outside of Brisbane.
(2) A major road caters for high traffic volumes and their traffic function is not compromised by parking and access driveways.
(3) Major roads provide:
(a) high-volume, high-speed through-traffic movements for pedestrians, cyclists, public transport, freight and private vehicles;
(b) connections between suburbs, major destinations and areas outside Brisbane;
(c) locations for major utility assets;
(d) the public domain as connectors and places of social and economic activities and buffers that mitigate the air and noise impacts of vehicle traffic on the adjacent activities;
(e) for the separation of transport modes.
(4) The through-traffic function of major roads may need to be balanced with public realm outcomes such as a social and economic pedestrian environment that enables people to access services and businesses if they travel through centres where pedestrian and public transport accessibility is a priority.

2.2.3 Minor roads

(1) A minor road provides for local traffic movements.
(2) A minor road is a low-speed environment that gives priority to pedestrians and cyclists.
(3) Minor roads cater for low traffic volumes and provide for direct property access.
(4) Minor roads provide:
(a) a low-speed environment that caters to low traffic volumes;
(b) connections between local neighbourhoods and major roads;
(c) local transport movements for all transport modes, including for vehicle and pedestrian movements and is a shared space;
(d) places as part of the public realm for pedestrians and cyclists;
(e) direct driveway access to properties.
(5) Mode separation by lane allocation or wider kerb side lanes on minor roads that carry in excess of 3,000 vehicles per day is preferred.

2.2.4 Description of road hierarchy classifications

A description of each classification in the road hierarchy is shown in Table 2.2.4.A, Table 2.2.4.B, Table 2.2.4.C, Table 2.2.4.D, Table 2.2.4.E and Table 2.2.4.F.

Table 2.2.4.A—Motorway
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A motorway:
(a) has a major road function;
(b) provides for inter and intra-regional connections and directs longer distance traffic around heavily developed areas;
(c) is a high-speed restricted access environment that is designed for the efficient and safe movement of high volumes of people and goods;
(d) accommodates pedestrians, cyclists and motor vehicles and in some instances public transport on separated carriageways.
Description
Cross-section
A motorway:
(a) is typically a divided road of 3 to 4 lanes each way for exclusive use by motorised vehicles;
(b) may include parallel service roads for access and separated pathways for pedestrians and cyclists.
Traffic
Traffic volume
High volume (over 50,000 vehicles per day)
Typical signposted speed
High speed (80 km/h to 110km/h)
Access
Intersection
A motorway has:
(a) grade-separated intersections provided at speed entry and exit ramps to/from other routes;
(b) grade-separated vehicle crossings.
Individual lot access
Access:
(a) directly to individual lots is not permitted;
(b) from driveways may be provided from parallel service roads.
Freight-dependent development
Vehicle travel
Standard vehicle unless identified as a primary freight route on the Road hierarchy overlay map.
Public transport
Vehicle travel
High-frequency through-vehicle services
Bus stops
Not permitted.
Cycling
On road
Not permitted on carriageway.
Off road
A separated bicycle path within or parallel to the motorway corridor may be provided.
Pedestrian
Footpath
Not permitted on carriageway.
Other
Physical or grade separated pedestrian facilities provide connectivity between adjoining land uses that are isolated by motorways.
Streetscape
Streetscape type
Project-specific urban design requirements.
Other attributes
Parking
Not permitted.
Local area traffic management (LATM)
Not permitted.
Corridor environment
A motorway:
(a) has full physical separation of all modes;
(b) has physical separation of all modes from adjoining urban land uses;
(c) minimises environmental impacts on surrounding land uses.
Special features
A motorway has:
(a) emergency breakdown lanes and/or stopping areas;
(b) emergency telephones.

Note—Motorways in Brisbane are controlled by the Queensland Government and Queensland Motorways and must be designed, constructed and operated in accordance with Transport Infrastructure Act 1994.

Table 2.2.4.B—Arterial road
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
An arterial road:
(a) has a major road function;
(b) provides intra-city connections between principal and major regional activity centres and major employment areas both within Brisbane and in the surrounding areas;
(c) caters for high volumes of traffic;
(d) provides bus priority on the road and at intersections;
(e) avoids conflicts between pedestrian, bicycle and motorised traffic by physically separating pedestrian, non-motorised and motorised modes;
(f) contributes to the public domain of the city;
(g) provides one of the city’s subtropical boulevards;
(h) in centres, the public domain and social and economic functions of the road are balanced with the through traffic function.
Description
Cross-section
An arterial road is typically a divided road of 2 to 3 traffic lanes each way and may include:
(a) a median;
(b) a bicycle lane;
(c) bus priority;
(d) indented bus stops;
(e) pathways on both sides and streetscape treatment.
Traffic
Traffic volume
Over 30,000 vehicles per day
Typical signposted speed
80km/h
Access
Intersection
An arterial road has:
(a) grade-separated access to motorways;
(b) signalised intersections to inter-connecting arterial and suburban roads;
(c) signalised or priority-controlled intersections to district roads;
(d) access to minor roads generally restricted to left in left out;
(e) bus priority on some intersections.
Direct lot access
Not permitted
Freight-dependent development
Vehicle travel
Standard vehicle unless identified as a primary freight route on the Road hierarchy overlay map.
Public transport
Vehicle travel
High-frequency bus services with bus priority measures
Bus stops
Indented bus bay
Bicycle
On road
Bicycle lane
Off road
Provide off-road facilities if identified in the bicycle network on the Bicycle network overlay map.
Pedestrian
Footpath
Wide verge accommodating footpaths on both sides
Streetscape type
Subtropical boulevards or locality streetscapes may be provided if identified on the Streetscape hierarchy overlay map.
Other attributes
Parking
On-street parking:
(a) is not permitted;
(b) may be prohibited at peak periods if provided in commercial centres.
LATM
Not permitted
Corridor environment
An arterial road:
(a) is designed to present attractive landscaped entrances and routes through Brisbane;
(b) incorporates design measures to minimise environmental impacts on surrounding land uses;
(c) does not have its function interfered with by land uses along the road that provide active street frontage.
Table 2.2.4.C—Suburban road
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A suburban road:
(a) has a major road function;
(b) connects suburbs to arterial roads (sub-arterial);
(c) provides safe and efficient movement of moderate to high volumes of traffic of motor vehicles, including public transport and pedestrians and cyclists;
(d) avoids conflicts between pedestrian, bicycle and motorised traffic by physically segregating different modes.
Description
Cross-section
A suburban road is typically a divided road with up to 2 lanes each way and may include:
(a) a median;
(b) a bicycle lane;
(c) indented bus stops;
(d) footpaths on both sides and streetscape treatment.
Traffic
Traffic volume
15,000 to 30,000 vehicles per day
Typical signposted speed
70km/h
Access
Intersection
Generally has:
(a) signalised intersections to arterial and suburban roads;
(b) signalised or priority controlled intersections with district and minor roads.
Direct lot access
Not permitted
Freight-dependent development
Vehicle travel
Standard vehicle unless identified as a primary freight route on the Road hierarchy overlay map
Public transport
Vehicle travel
High-frequency services with bus priority measures
Bus stops
Indented bus bay
Cycling
On road
Bicycle lane
Off road
Provide for if identified on bicycle hierarchy
Pedestrian
Footpath
Wide verge with footpaths on both sides
Streetscape type
City, neighbourhood or locality streetscapes to be provided if identified on the Streetscape hierarchy overlay map
Other attributes
Parking
On-street parking is inappropriate. If provided it may be prohibited at peak periods.
LATM
Not permitted
Corridor environment
Suburban road:
(a) is designed to present attractive landscaped routes through Brisbane;
(b) incorporates design measure to minimise environmental impacts on surrounding land uses;
(c) does not have its function interfered with by land uses along the road that provide active street frontage.
Table 2.2.4.D—District road
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A district road provides:
(a) for through-traffic including local freight and public transport;
(b) links for minor roads and local centres to suburban and arterial roads.
Description
Cross-section
A district road is typically an undivided road with 1to 2 lanes each way and may include:
(a) a bicycle lane;
(b) indented bus stops;
(c) footpaths on both sides and streetscape treatment.
Traffic
Traffic volume
6,000–15,000 vehicles per day
Typical signposted speed
40km/h–60km/h appropriate to adjoining land uses
Access
Intersection
Signalised or priority controlled intersections with major roads and minor roads
Direct lot access
Generally driveway access is not permitted.
Freight dependant development
Vehicle travel
Standard vehicle unless identified as a primary freight route on the Road hierarchy overlay map.
Public transport
Vehicle travel
High-frequency bus service
Bus stops
On-road bus stops where space allows
Cycling
On road
Bicycle lanes
Off road
Provided for if identified on the Bicycle network overlay map
Pedestrian
Footpath
Wide verge with footpaths on both sides
Streetscape type
City, neighbourhood or locality streetscapes be provided if identified on the Streetscape hierarchy overlay map.
Other attributes
Parking
On-street parking:
(a) is not appropriate;
(b) may be permitted in centres if a properly designed parking lane is provided for two-lane two-way roads;
(c) may be prohibited within peak periods.
LATM
Not appropriate
Corridor environment
District road:
(a) minimises environmental impact on surrounding land uses;
(b) does not have its function interfered with by land uses along the road that provide active street frontage.
Table 2.2.4.E—Neighbourhood road
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic
A neighbourhood road:
(a) has a minor road function;
(b) carries low volumes of local traffic between local and district roads;
(c) provides priority and a safe environment for pedestrians and cyclists.
Description
Cross-section
Typically an undivided, two-lane roadway, but may be wider if located on a bus route
Traffic
Traffic volume
1,000 to 6,000 vehicles per day
Typical signposted speed
50km/h unless signed otherwise
Access
Intersection
Priority-controlled intersections to district roads
Direct lot access
Appropriate
Commercial
Vehicle travel
Refuse collection vehicle
Public Transport
Vehicle travel
Local bus services
Bus stops
On-road bus stops if on a bus route
Cycling
On road
It is appropriate to bicycle in the general traffic lanes.
Off road
Not required
Pedestrian
Footpath
A neighbourhood road:
(a) provide a shared pedestrian and cyclist environment;
(b) provide standard verge width and footpaths.
Streetscape type
City, neighbourhood or locality streetscapes are provided if identified on the Streetscape hierarchy overlay map.
Other attributes
Parking
On-street parking
LATM
LATM:
(a) is appropriate if required;
(b) should not be part of new road design.

Note—Designs may be modified to accommodate buses if on a bus route.

Corridor environment
Designed to prioritise safe use by pedestrians and cyclists and avoid conflicts between pedestrians, bicycles and motorised traffic.
Table 2.2.4.F—Local road
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A local road:
(a) has a minor road function;
(b) provides low-speed local travel and direct property access;
(c) is a safe environment for pedestrians and cyclists;
(d) includes laneways as a type of local road.
Description
Cross-section
Designed and constructed as an undivided, one or two lane carriageway
Traffic
Traffic volume
Up to 1,000 vehicles per day
Typical signposted speed
Up to 50km/h
Access
Intersection
Priority controlled intersections to roads with a high volume of vehicles per day
Direct lot access
Appropriate
Freight
Vehicle travel
Refuse collection vehicle
Public Transport
Vehicle travel
Local bus services
Bus stops
On-road bus stops
Cycling
On road
It is appropriate to bicycle in the general traffic lanes.
Off road
Not required
Pedestrian
Footpath
Laneways
All other local roads:
(a) provide a shared pedestrian and cyclist preferred environment;
(b) provide standard verge width.
Other
Provide a pedestrian and cyclist preferred environment.
Streetscape
Streetscape type
Laneways
All other local roads, city, neighbourhood or locality streetscapes to be provided if identified on the Streetscape hierarchy overlay map.
Other attributes
Parking
On-street parking
LATM
LATM:
(a) is appropriate if required;
(b) should not be part of new road design.

Note—Design may be modified to accommodate buses if on a bus route.

Corridor environment
Local road:
(a) is designed to prioritise safe use by pedestrians and cyclists and avoid conflicts between pedestrians, bicycles and motor vehicle traffic;
(b) where a laneway, is characterised by buildings built to boundary with no opportunities for widening.
Special features
Laneways (require a specific standard)

2.3 Freight network

2.3.1 General

(1) The road network requires appropriate design standards for all aspects of road infrastructure to accommodate heavy vehicles.
(2) The purpose of the freight network is to provide for the safe and efficient movement of heavy vehicles required to support the industrial and commercial land uses that underpin the Brisbane economy.
(3) The freight network identifies roads designed to accommodate heavy vehicles and includes:
(a) primary freight routes;
(b) primary freight access.

Note—The freight network does not identify routes for higher mass limits (HML) vehicles with road-friendly suspensions and the transporting of dangerous goods as this is a Queensland government licensing responsibility. However, the freight network seeks to encourage HML and dangerous good routes to use the primary freight routes.

Note—The freight network includes tunnels that may not be able to be used by vehicles carrying dangerous goods.

2.3.2 Description of freight network classifications

A description of each classification of the Brisbane freight network is shown in Table 2.3.2.A and Table 2.3.2.B.

Table 2.3.2.A—Primary freight routes
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A primary freight route:
(a) provides direct high capacity connections for non-standard vehicles between major industrial and freight dependant commercial land uses and inter-regional destinations;
(b) prioritises freight movements of non-standard vehicles.
Access
Intersections
An intersection is geometrically designed for non-standard vehicles and is:
(a) grade separated to motorways;
(b) signalised to major roads and the primary freight access routes.
Direct lot access
Not permitted
Freight-dependent development
Vehicle travel
B-double combination vehicles
HML vehicles with road-friendly suspensions
Provide for HML vehicles.
Dangerous goods
Provide for vehicles carrying dangerous goods.

Note—Dangerous goods may be excluded from primary freight routes that include tunnels.

Other attributes
Corridor environment
Primary freight route:
(a) is prioritised for safe and efficient movement of non-standard vehicles;
(b) has full separation of motorised and non-motorised modes;
(c) resolves potential conflicts between bicycle lanes and primary freight routes through lane width and signage;
(d) uses a larger kerbside lane appropriate to the signposted speed;
(e) places signage, street trees and furniture to accommodate the lateral clearances required by non-standard vehicles;
(f) has a vertical clearance as per Department of Transport and Main Roads requirements.
Table 2.3.2.B—Primary freight access routes
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A primary freight access route:
(a) provides links between the primary freight routes and to major industrial and freight dependant commercial land uses for non-standard vehicles;
(b) provides local and direct lot access for non-standard vehicles.
Access
Intersection
An intersection is geometrically designed for non-standard vehicles and is signalised to major roads and the primary freight access routes.
Direct lot access
Appropriate
Freight-dependent development
Vehicle travel
B-double combination vehicles
HML for vehicles with road friendly suspensions
Provide for HML vehicles.
Dangerous goods
Provide for vehicles carrying dangerous goods.
Other attributes
Corridor environment
Prioritised for safe and efficient direct lot access for non-standard vehicles including trucks and vans as per Department of Transport and Main Roads requirements.

2.4 Bicycle network

2.4.1 General

(1) The bicycle network identifies Brisbane’s existing and future bicycle routes and provides a network of connected corridors that allow cyclists to move safely and directly from where they are to where they want to go.
(2) The bicycle network corridors include infrastructure and facilities such as paths, bicycle lanes, intersections, mid-block crossings, bicycle bridges, underpasses and overpasses, signage, lighting, street furniture and bicycle parking.
(3) The bicycle network is shown in the Bicycle network overlay map and includes the following bicycle routes:
(a) primary bicycle route;
(b) secondary bicycle route;
(c) local bicycle route;
(d) Riverwalk.
(4) Chapter 12 of this planning scheme policy provides additional guidance on the design standards for Riverwalk facilities.
(5) The bicycle network does not include footpaths however shared paths may be provided in the road verge.
(6) Although cyclists are able to use footpaths in Queensland, these facilities are primarily designed for pedestrian use.
(7) An off-road bicycle route requires a corridor that provides for the pathway and associated infrastructure and amenities (lighting, signposts, shade trees and clearances from the path edge to these facilities and clearances for sightlines).

2.4.2 Description of bicycle route characteristics

A description of the characteristics of each bicycle route in the bicycle network is shown in Table 2.4.2.A, Table 2.4.2.B and Table 2.4.2.C.

Table 2.4.2.A—Primary bicycle routes
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A primary bicycle route:
(a) provides high-capacity inter-suburban cycling routes between centres, major employment areas and key destinations;
(b) provides a safe and direct route for a wide range of cyclists, including high-speed commuting cyclists;
(c) may require a combination of parallel pathway types to cater for different cyclists, e.g. bicycle lanes for experienced cyclists and off-road shared pathways for less experienced cyclists.
Traffic
Traffic volume
More than 1,000 bicycle movements per day
 
On-road routes
Off-road routes
Cyclists
Facility type
A primary bicycle route has:
(a) bicycle lanes;
(b) on-road separated bicycle lanes.
A primary bicycle route has:
(a) bicycle paths;
(b) separated paths;
(c) wide shared paths.
Pedestrians
Facility type
N/A
A primary bicycle route has:
(a) separated paths;
(b) wide shared paths;
(c) where bicycle paths are provided, footpaths for pedestrians on an alternative route.
Interaction with other transport modes
N/A
A primary bicycle route:
(a) is separated from vehicle traffic through bicycle lanes on major roads;
(b) shares road space on minor roads;
(c) where also on a freight route, has wider bicycle lanes.
Management of cyclist and pedestrian interactions is critical and careful consideration is required to ensure paths are designed to minimise pedestrian–cyclist conflict.
Access
Intersections
An intersection:
(a) if signalised, requires bicycle lanes and may require bicycle box treatment, bicycle detection devices or push-button activators;
(b) if a roundabout, may require specific treatments for cyclists.
An intersection of a path with a road provides:
(a) grade separation (underpasses or overpasses) or signalised bicycle crossings with bike lanterns where a path crosses a major road;
(b) refuges or other crossing treatments at a minor road.
Supporting Infrastructure
N/A
N/A
A primary bicycle route provides:
(a) lighting;
(b) way-finding signage;
(c) drinking fountains;
(d) shade trees;
(e) landscaping;
(f) seating;
(g) public art where appropriate.
Surrounding land uses
N/A
N/A
Surrounding land uses provide active frontages onto pathways outside the road reserve to maximise surveillance opportunities.
Other attributes
Parking
Parking comprises:
(a) kerbside lanes on bicycle routes that are 4.5m wide or an off-road alternative;
(b) parking bays that are delineated by T markers.
N/A
LATM
Any LATM should be appropriate for cyclists.
N/A
Table 2.4.2.B—Secondary bicycle routes
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A secondary bicycle route:
(a) provides intra-suburban bicycle routes linking key residential areas to key land uses and primary routes;
(b) provides for a wide range of users, but may require higher speed users to take care and ride to suit the conditions;
(c) may be required to have parallel on and off-road facilities based on local conditions.
Traffic
Traffic volume
Between 100 and 1,000 bicycle movements per day
 
On-road bicycle routes
Off-road bicycle routes
Cyclists
Facility type
A secondary bicycle route has bicycle lanes.
A secondary bicycle route has:
(a) separated paths;
(b) shared paths.
Pedestrians
Facility type
N/A
A secondary bicycle route has:
(a) separated paths;
(b) shared paths.
Interaction with other transport modes
 
A secondary bicycle route:
(a) is separated from vehicle traffic through bicycle lanes on major roads;
(b) shares road space on minor roads;
(c) where also on a freight route, has wider bicycle lanes.
Management of cyclist and pedestrian interactions is critical and careful consideration is required to ensure paths are designed to minimise pedestrian–cyclist conflict.
Access
Intersections
An intersection:
(a) where signalised, requires bicycle lanes and may require bicycle box treatment, bicycle detection devices or push-button activators;
(b) where a roundabout, may require specific treatments for cyclists.
An intersection of a path with a road provides:
(a) grade separation (underpasses or overpasses) or signalised bicycle crossings with bike lanterns where a path crosses a major road;
(b) refuges or other crossing treatments at a minor road.
Supporting Infrastructure
N/A
N/A
A secondary bicycle route provides:
(a) lighting;
(b) way-finding signage;
(c) shade trees;
(d) landscaping.
Surrounding land uses
N/A
N/A
Surrounding land uses provide active frontages onto pathways outside the road reserve to maximise surveillance opportunities.
Other attributes
Parking
Parking comprises:
(a) kerbside lanes on bicycle routes that are either 4.5m wide or an off-road alternative is provided;
(b) parking bays that are delineated by T markers.
N/A
LATM
Any LATM should be appropriate for cyclists.
N/A
Table 2.4.2.C—Local bicycle routes
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and traffic role
A local bicycle route:
(a) provides a link from individual properties or destinations to the primary and secondary route networks;
(b) may not be required to have dedicated cycling facilities.
Traffic
Traffic volume
Fewer than 100 bicycle movements per day
 
On-road bicycle route
Off-road bicycle route
Cyclists
Facility type
A local bicycle route has bicycle lanes.
Shared paths
Pedestrians
Facility type
N/A
Shared paths
Interaction with other transport modes
 
A local bicycle route:
(a) is separated from vehicle traffic through bicycle lanes on major roads;
(b) shares road space on minor roads.
Volumes of path users allow safe operation of shared paths by pedestrians and cyclists.
Access
Intersections
Roundabouts may require specific treatments for cyclists.
An intersection of a path with a road provides:
(a) grade separation (underpasses or overpasses) or signalised bicycle crossings with bike lanterns are required where a path crosses a major road;
(b) refuges or other crossing treatments are provided at a minor road.
Supporting Infrastructure
N/A
N/A
A local bicycle route provides:
(a) way-finding signage;
(b) shade trees;
(c) landscaping.
Surrounding land uses
N/A
N/A
Surrounding land uses provide active frontages onto pathways outside the road reserve to maximise surveillance opportunities.
Other attributes
Parking
Parking comprises:
(a) kerbside lanes on bicycle routes that are either 4.5m wide or an off-road alternative;
(b) parking bays that are delineated by T markers.
N/A
LATM
Any LATM should be appropriate for cyclists.
N/A

2.5 Streetscape hierarchy

2.5.1 General

(1) The streetscape hierarchy applies to all verges and paths in road corridors for the purpose of non-vehicle (i.e. pedestrian, bicycles and mobility scooters) access only.
(2) The aim of the streetscape hierarchy is to:
(a) prioritise streets to create more useable public spaces that provide consistent verge treatments, widened where applicable to fit the predominant adjacent land use and volume of pedestrian traffic;
(b) develop verges with an emphasis on enhancing pedestrian connections, providing spaces for meeting and increasing shade, amenity and visual quality;
(c) increase subtropical vegetation to reduce the urban heat island effect and to reinforce Brisbane’s distinct character as a subtropical city;
(d) achieve the consistent use of a simplified, standard palette of materials.
(3) The streetscape hierarchy delivers verges with consistent widths and finishes appropriate to their locality.
(4) Verge appearance will vary and be specific to a locality through the variety of building transitions, built forms and street trees that will characterise different neighbourhoods.
(5) The application of the streetscape hierarchy is determined by the adjoining road hierarchy type and zone, or locality, as detailed in the tables below.
(6) In the event that a new use approved by the Council is not consistent with the outcomes sought with the relevant zone, the zone which best reflects the approved use determines the appropriate streetscape type.
(7) Chapter 3 of this planning scheme policy provides the detailed design requirements, typical layouts and standard materials palette for the streetscape types.
(8) Alternative streetscape outcomes include:
(a) locality streets;
(b) cross block links;
(c) corner land dedications;
(d) laneways.
(9) Where the standard streetscape types are not appropriate due to an existing established character that is to be retained and enhanced, streets may be designated locality streets to allow an alternative verge layout or material selection.
(10) Locality streets also include existing suburban centre improvement projects; in these locations, verges are to be consistent with the relevant provisions detailed in Chapter 5 of this planning scheme policy.
(11) Cross block links are publicly owned pathways providing improved pedestrian permeability and access.
(12) Cross block links can be located in centres, or out of centres in residential areas.
(13) Design requirements for cross block links are in Chapter 3 of this planning scheme policy.
(14) Inverted or truncated corner land dedications are required at some street corners to provide opportunities to plant landmark subtropical trees marking gateways and assisting with way finding.
(15) Design requirements for inverted or truncated corner land dedications are in Chapter 3 of this planning scheme policy.
(16) Laneways are identified in the Streetscape hierarchy overlay map.
(17) Design requirements for laneways are in Chapter 3 of this planning scheme policy.

2.5.2 Description of streetscape hierarchy classifications

(1) The streetscape hierarchy includes the following standard streetscape types:
(a) subtropical boulevard;
(b) city street;
(c) neighbourhood street;
(d) industrial street.
(2) A description of each type of streetscape is shown in the Table 2.5.2.A, Table 2.5.2.B, Table 2.5.2.C and Table 2.5.2.D below.
Table 2.5.2.A—Subtropical boulevards
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and role
A subtropical boulevard:
(a) is located on arterial road corridors;
(b) utilises subtropical planting to reinforce city gateways, thresholds and nodes;
(c) has subtropical vegetation, including a mix of iconic tree species which create visual landmarks and make a significant contribution to the tree cover along the major road corridors;
(d) has active frontages abutting where they pass through centres;
(e) is not generally appropriate for passive uses such as footpath dining due to high vehicular use;
(f) has limited pedestrian movement when outside centres.
Description
Infrastructure
An in centre (SB1) subtropical boulevard has a fully paved verge with subtropical planting in garden beds and tree grates, street furniture and pedestrian lighting.
An out of centre (SB2) subtropical boulevard has a separate paved area with subtropical trees planted in a turf strip.
Application
Road hierarchy
Arterial roads, excluding State-controlled arterial roads, and arterial roads in the City Centre.
Zone
An in centre (SB1) subtropical boulevard may be in the:
(a) Principal centre zone (Regional centre) precinct;
An out of centre (SB2) subtropical boulevard may be in any zone other than applicable for SB1.
Cycling
On verge
May be appropriate as shared path where designated on the bicycle network.
Table 2.5.2.B—City streets
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and role
A city street:
(a) is located in centres and often on secondary routes with medium to low vehicle use;
(b) has active frontages abutting;
(c) allows for passive uses such as footpath dining where verge width permits;
(d) serves as a pedestrian route, being a key connector between destinations.
Description
Infrastructure
Fully paved verge with street trees in garden beds and tree grates, street furniture and pedestrian lighting.
Application
Road hierarchy
Any road type other than arterial
Zone or location
A city street major (CS1) is in a location as specified on Streetscape hierarchy overlay map.
A city street minor (CS2) is in the:
Cycling
On verge
May be appropriate as shared path where designated on the bicycle network.
Table 2.5.2.C—Neighbourhood streets
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and role
A neighbourhood street:
(a) is located in residential and other areas with a predominantly local pedestrian environment;
(b) will occasionally provide a pedestrian connection between destinations.
Description
Infrastructure
A neighbourhood street major (NS1) has a verge with a concrete footpath in turf and street trees.
A neighbourhood street minor (NS2) has a verge with turf and street trees, and a concrete footpath where there is sufficient pedestrian activity.
Application
Road hierarchy
Any road type other than arterial
Zone or location
A neighbourhood street major (NS1) is in the:
A neighbourhood street minor (NS2) is in the:
Cycling
On verge
May be appropriate as shared path where designated on the bicycle network.
Table 2.5.2.D—Industrial streets
Characteristic
Attribute
Description
Function
Primary function and role
An industrial street is located in industrial areas with a predominantly local pedestrian environment.
Description
Infrastructure
An industrial street has a verge with concrete footpath in turf, and street trees placed to accommodate the lateral clearances required by non-standard vehicles.
Width
Verge width
3.75m (or 4.25m for new roads)
Application
Road hierarchy
Any road type other than arterial
Zone
Industry zone
Cycling
On verge
May be appropriate as shared path where designated on the bicycle network.

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