watermark

Chapter 1 Introduction

Contents

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Application of chapter 1

1.3 Infrastructure design reports

1.4 Hydrologic and hydraulic assessments and models

1.5 Design plans, drawings and figures

1.6 Detailed landscape plans

1.7 Arborist reports and vegetation plans

1.8 Earthworks

1.9 Roads

1.10 Stormwater drainage

1.11 Standard and non-standard infrastructure

1.1 Introduction

1.1.1 Relationship to planning scheme

This planning scheme policy:

(a) provides information the Council may request for a development application;
(b) provides guidance or advice about satisfying an assessment criteria which identifies this planning scheme policy as providing that guidance or advice;
(c) states a standard for the assessment criteria in the following table.
Column 1 –
Section or table in the code
Column 2 –
Assessment criteria reference
Column 3 –
Standards in planning scheme policy
Part 7
Bulimba district neighbourhood plan code
AO4
Chapter 10; Chapter 12
AO5.1
Chapter 4
AO10
Chapter 10; Chapter 12
AO15.2
Section 3.7.4.7; Section 3.7.4.9
City Centre neighbourhood plan code
AO21
Section 3.7
Eastern corridor neighbourhood plan code
AO9.3
Section 3.7.4.8; Chapter 6
AO11.1
Section 3.7
AO18.1
Chapter 4
PO39
Chapter 10
Fortitude Valley neighbourhood plan code
PO5
Section 3.7
AO5.1
Section 3.7
AO5.2
Section 3.7
AO6.2
Section 3.7.4.8; Chapter 6
AO6.3
Section 5.3.3
AO13.2
Section 3.7.4.7
PO14
Section 3.7; Section 5.3.3
Ithaca district neighbourhood plan code
AO4.2
Chapter 4
Latrobe and Given Terraces neighbourhood plan code
AO11
Section 3.7; Chapter 3
Lutwyche Road corridor neighbourhood plan code
AO3
Section 3.7; Chapter 10
AO6.2
Section 3.7
AO16.3
Section 3.7
Mt Gravatt corridor neighbourhood plan code
AO6
Section 3.7
AO7
Chapter 10
AO19.1
Chapter 7
AO19.2
Chapter 3; Chapter 7
New Farm and Teneriffe hill neighbourhood plan code
AO28.3
Chapter 3; Chapter 4
AO28.4
Chapter 12
Newstead and Teneriffe waterfront neighbourhood plan code
AO2.1
Section 3.7; Section 5.3.6; Chapter 6; Chapter 12
AO2.2
Chapter 12
Rochedale urban community neighbourhood plan code
AO9
Section 9.5
AO15.3
Chapter 7
AO15.4
Chapter 3; Chapter 7
Sherwood—Graceville district neighbourhood plan code
AO4.5
Section 3.7
AO16
Chapter 3
South Brisbane riverside neighbourhood plan code
AO6.3
Section 3.7.4.8
AO9.3
Chapter 3; Section 5.3.7; Chapter 10
AO10.2
Chapter 3; Section 5.3.7
AO15.1
Chapter 8
AO19.2
Chapter 10
Part 8
Bicycle network overlay code
AO1.1
Section 2.4; Section 3.6; Chapter 4
AO3.1
Section 2.4; Section 2.5; Section 3.6; Chapter 4; Section 8.7; Section 8.8; Chapter 12
AO3.3
Section 3.6; Section 3.7; Chapter 4; Chapter 12
AO4
Chapter 6; Section 12.13
AO7.1
Chapter 4; Chapter 8; Chapter 12
AO7.2
Chapter 8; Chapter 12
Biodiversity areas overlay code
AO4
Section 3.9
Flood overlay code
AO2 note
Chapter 7; Chapter 8
AO5.1
Chapter 7; Chapter 8
AO7.1
Chapter 7; Chapter 8
AO7.3
Chapter 7; Chapter 8
Road hierarchy overlay code
AO4
Chapter 2; Chapter 3
AO6.1
Chapter 2; Chapter 3
AO6.2
Chapter 2; Chapter 3
AO8
Chapter 2; Chapter 3
Streetscape hierarchy overlay code
AO1
Section 2.5; Chapter 3
AO2.2
Section 2.5; Chapter 3; Chapter 5
AO3.1
Section 2.5; Chapter 3; Chapter 5
AO3.2
Section 2.5; Chapter 3; Chapter 5
AO3.3
Section 2.5; Chapter 5; Chapter 6
AO4
Section 2.5; Chapter 3; Chapter 5
AO5.1
Section 2.5; Chapter 3; Chapter 5
Laneway
Chapter 3
Part 9
Centre or mixed use code
AO15.1
Section 2.5; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Chapter 10
AO43
Chapter 4
AO66.2
Section 3.7.4.8
AO67.2
Section 3.7.4.8
Multiple dwelling code
AO47.2
Section 3.7.4.8
AO49.2
Section 3.7.4.8
Park code
AO1 note
Chapter 10
AO9.2 note
Chapter 8; Chapter 10
Park planning and design code
PO6
Section 2.4; Chapter 4; Chapter 9; Chapter 10
AO11.2
Chapter 10
AO13.2
Chapter 10
Special purpose code
AO12
Section 2.5; Section 3.7; Chapter 5
Specialised centre code
   
AO17
Chapter 5
AO21
Section 2.5; Section 3.7; Chapter 5
AO45
Chapter 8
Filling and excavation code
CO8
Section 8.5
AO2.2
Section 8.5
AO3
Section 8.5
AO5
Chapter 7; Section 8.5
AO7.1
Chapter 7
AO7.2
Section 7.1.1
Infrastructure design code
AO1
Chapter 3
AO2
Chapter 3
AO3
Chapter 3
AO4
Chapter 3; Chapter 5
AO5
Chapter 5
AO6
Chapter 3
AO7
Section 2.4; Chapter 3; Chapter 4
AO10.3
Chapter 9
AO13
Chapter 6
AO15
Chapter 13
AO16
Chapter 11
AO17
Chapter 8
AO18
Section 8.3
AO19
Section 8.5; Section 8.8
Landscape work code
CO4
Section 8.9
CO18
Section 8.5
AO2.1
Section 8.9
AO11
Section 8.5
Operational work code
PO1
All
Stormwater code
AO1
Chapter 7
AO2.2
Chapter 7
AO3.2
Chapter 7
AO3.3
Section 7.6
AO4.1
Chapter 7
AO4.2
Chapter 7
AO6.2
Section 7.5
AO7.2
Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 7
AO8.3
Section 7.8
AO8.4
Chapter 7
AO11.2
Chapter 7
AO12.1
Chapter 7
AO16
Chapter 7
Subdivision code
AO4.1
All
AO7.1
Chapter 3
AO10.3
Section 3.2; Section 3.3;
Section 3.5
AO11.2
Chapter 3
AO12.1
Section 2.4; Section 3.6;
Section 3.7; Chapter 4
AO12.3
Section 2.4; Section 3.6;
Section 3.7; Chapter 4
AO15
Chapter 3
AO16
Section 3.7.4.8
AO17
Chapter 3
AO18
Chapter 3
AO19
Chapter 3
Transport, access, parking and service code
AO4.2
Section 2.4; Section 3.6; Section 3.7; Chapter 4
AO21.3
Section 3.3
AO21.2
Section 3.4

1.1.2 Purpose of planning scheme policy

The purpose of the Infrastructure design planning scheme policy is to provide the information required for a development application, guidance and advice on satisfying assessment criteria and standards for assessment criteria for the design and delivery of infrastructure to a high quality to appropriately service the needs of the community and support the ongoing functions of the city.

Editor’s note—This planning scheme policy is drafted as part of the planning scheme. If this planning scheme policy is used for another purpose (i.e. not under the Integrated Development Assessment System of the Sustainable Planning Act 2009), any variation to the standards, guidance or advice, whether or not any variation is envisaged in the planning scheme policy, must only be made with approval of Council.

Editor’s note—Technical requirements for the construction, handover and practical completions stages of an infrastructure build are provided in Council’s Infrastructure Installation and Construction Requirement Manual and related operating procedures and documents.

1.1.3 Terminology

In this planning scheme policy, unless the subject matter or context indicates or requires otherwise, a term has the following meaning:

Table 1.1.3.A— Index of terminology
Index of terms used
Term
Definition
Activity space
A relatively small area within a larger park or natural area, which is designed to concentrate visitor use and facilities and to act as a focal point.
Afflux
The rise in water level on the upstream side of a bridge, culvert or obstruction caused when the flow area of a waterway is obstructed by the new structure.
Awning
Any structure that is attached to a building and spans above and across the footway.
Bikeway
A pathway set aside for cyclists, or designated as a shared facility for cyclists and pedestrians.
Biodiversity
The natural diversity of wildlife (plants and animals), together with the environmental conditions necessary for their survival.
Bridge
Brisbane’s Riverwalk
Identified in the bicycle network as a primary cycle route, given its function as an important facility for recreational and commuter cyclists and pedestrians.
Clean stormwater
Stormwater that has not been contaminated by sediment or other prescribed contaminants from the work site, or has not been directly or indirectly contaminated as a result of actions associated with the work site.
Contaminated stormwater
Water not classified as clean stormwater. Also called 'dirty water'.
Controllable erosion
Accelerated soil erosion that can be controlled or prevented through reasonable and practicable measures while allowing the associated land-disturbing development to continue.
Corridor link park
A park providing connections for recreation and commuter use.
Culvert
Culvert asset boundaries must extend beyond the barrels to include the head walls (or parapet walls), wing walls, aprons, base slabs to support the barrels (if any), and guardrails (or handrails) structurally attached to the culvert.
District parks or facilities
A park or recreation facility that is intended to serve an area within a 2km to 5km radius.
Elevated structure
A suspended infrastructure asset, other than a bridge, where the walking track, deck or platform is supported on a substructure rather than directly bearing on the ground.
Erosion hazard assessment
Refers to the current version of Brisbane City Council’s Erosion Hazard Assessment (EHA) form and Supporting Technical Notes.
ESC plan(s)
A site plan(s), showing a graphical representation of the ESC measures (including suitably detailed explanatory notes and details on the plan) that when implemented during land-disturbing activities will protect waters from the impacts of land and infrastructure development.
ESC program
A set of documents including ESC plans, supporting documentation, specifications and construction details that sets out the erosion and sediment control strategies necessary to protect waters from the impacts of land and infrastructure development.
For some forms of development (e.g. subdivisions), the ESC program may contain several ESC plans, drawings of each ESC measure, a timetable for installation of ESC measures etc. The ESC program is a flexible document that is outcome focused and applies throughout the life of the development, from initial land disturbance until the land is permanently stabilised against erosion.
ESC measures
Best-practice drainage, erosion and sediment control principles and practices, both structural and non-structural, used to prevent and/or minimise the impacts of soil erosion and sediment pollution.
ESC standard
Council’s requirements for the protection of waters from the impacts of land and infrastructure development.
Freight-dependent development
Development that is to be serviced by a B-double (Austroad class 10 vehicle), multi-combination vehicle, over-dimensioned vehicle, or any other vehicle identified by the State Government as requiring a permit to operate on the road.
Freight network
Means primary freight access and/or primary freight route and freight-dependent development.
Heritage item
A building or feature with cultural or natural heritage significance included in the Heritage overlay code.
Hold point
A stage in the construction program beyond which work must not proceed until a stated activity or works has been completed and certified by the responsible person (Refer to Section 3.0 – Qualifications).
Informal use park
A park intended to provide a variety of casual recreational opportunities such as play, picnicking, and large social or community gatherings. An informal use park may also protect or enhance landscape amenity values.
Infrastructure
Land, facilities, services and works used for supporting park management and meeting environmental needs, including community needs.
Land disturbance
Any movement or disturbance of earth or soil, including interference with organic or inorganic ground coverage (e.g. grass, concrete) that exposes the earth to erosion.
Land-disturbing development
Work that involves moving or otherwise disturbing soil, including ground coverage.
Landmark/signature point
A sub-type of landscape amenity park, located in close proximity to a main thoroughfare, including parks that:
provide 'green gateways' to the city or City Centre and may include ornamental gardens, floral displays and manicured lawn; display monuments and memorials along major transport routes; contain landmarks and help orientate people moving through the city.
Landscape amenity park
A park intended to protect or enhance an area’s scenic or visual amenity value, such as scenic outlooks, landmarks and attractive vegetation along transport corridors.
Local bicycle route
A bicycle route that provides a link from individual properties or destinations to primary and secondary route networks.
Local parks or facilities
A park or recreation facility that services residents or workers within 500m or easy walking distance, without physical barriers to access (such as a railway line). In the case of natural areas, sport parks and informal use parks, the intended service catchment is influenced by the capacity of the park for sustained visitation.

Note—Parks may provide several recreation opportunities or functions but are classified according to their primary function.

Metropolitan parks or facilities
Are intended to serve or benefit all the residents and visitors across Brisbane, or generally within a 25km radius.
Natural area
A park with an area greater than 5ha of relatively intact native bushland, riparian and dryland habitat or wetland managed primarily for the protection and enhancement of biodiversity values and, where appropriate, opportunities for recreation in a natural setting.
Off-road bicycle route
A bicycle path, separated path or shared path.
On-road bicycle route
A bicycle lane or an on-road separated bicycle lane.
Open activity area
A grassed area within a larger park where informal activities such as ball games, Tai Chi and social events can safely take place, without detriment to other park visitors and to park values.
Open space
A network of spaces, with no or few built structures, that contribute to recreation opportunities, community health, biodiversity and the landscape setting or 'green' fabric of the city. Open space includes wetlands, bushlands, beaches, lakes, dams, culturally significant places, parks and outdoor recreation areas.
Park hierarchy
A system of parks and facilities provided to respond to levels of community need and the geographic area in which people can benefit from a park or facility. The park hierarchy reflects the distance people are willing to travel to use a park.
Pathway
A pathway with a fully constructed hard-wearing surface providing pedestrian access in high-use areas. Cyclists may use paths with care but unlike bikeways they are not designated for cyclist use.
Person
Includes a body of persons, whether incorporated or unincorporated.
Pest management plan
The Plan for Pest Management is prepared by Council and approved by the State Government under the provisions of the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002. The plan stipulates a coordinated approach within Brisbane to the management of declared noxious and environmental weeds. A list of weed species in each of these categories is available on the Council website at www.brisbane.qld.gov.au.
Ponding
Any water that has the ability to become stagnant.
Primary cycle route
A high-capacity cycle route that: provides for all cyclists, including high-speed commuters; links residential areas to major employment centres, regional activity centres and other key destinations, including public transport, educational, cultural and recreation facilities.
Primary freight access
The connection between primary-freight routes and freight-dependent development.
Primary freight route
A direct road connection for non-standard vehicles between regionally significant industrial areas, ports and inter-regional destinations.
Recreation
Any activity that a person chooses to undertake in their free time for enlightenment, enjoyment, personal development, health etc.
Roadside barrier
General term used to describe a barrier system installed to control the movement of vehicle or pedestrian traffic.
Safety barrier
A roadside barrier is installed to control or restrict the movement of errant or wayward vehicles.
Secondary cycle route
A cycle route that provides linkages between: residential areas and primary routes; suburban destinations such as schools, suburban centres, cultural activity areas and recreational facilities.
Sediment
Refer to definition in the Environmental Protection Act 1994 and the Environmental Protection Regulation 2008. Typically includes earth, soil, clay, silt, sand and gravel.
Site
The land over which works associated with the development are/will occur, whether internal or external to the real property boundaries of the primary work site location. Also called work site.
Skate facility guide
The skateboarding and BMX facilities design guidelines (available from Sport and Recreation Victoria at www.sport.vic.gov.au).
Sport
Any physical activity performed in accordance with set rules. It may take place indoors or outdoors, in water, on land or in the air. It can be either competitive or non-competitive and can involve individuals or teams.
Sporting field dimensions
The dimensions described in Australian Sports Facilities – Sports Dimensions for Playing Areas (available at www.ausport.gov.au).
Sports park
A park intended to provide a variety of structured or formal recreation opportunities, such as team competitions, physical skills development and training. It often includes multipurpose community facilities.
Standard vehicle
A vehicle that has a legal right of access to all roads including Austroads vehicle classes 1–9.
Stormwater
Surface water run-off following a rain event (including piped flows). Includes sub-surface water seepage that reaches the surface (e.g. ponding in sediment basin due to high water table).
Track
A formed and surfaced pathway (or maintenance access road) providing pedestrian, bicycle, horse and maintenance vehicle access within a park. The wearing surface is usually gravel, sand, deco or similar and may be stabilised.
Trail
A path similar to a track, but usually narrower and with a natural earth surface and providing access to remote areas of a park.
Urban common park
A sub-type of informal use park provided for intensive community use and located within highly urbanised settings, such as the CBD, major commercial centres, civic spaces and community hubs.
Umbrella
A non-permanent detached structure that is supported by a minimum number of upright posts.
Verge
That part of the street or road reserve between the carriageway and the boundary of the adjacent lot or other limit to the road reserve. It may accommodate service provider utility infrastructure, footpaths, stormwater flows, street lighting poles and planting.
Waters/watercourse/ waterway
For the purposes of this Standard is an interchangeable term of ordinary meaning. It may also have specific legal meaning in certain circumstances (e.g. Water Act 2000).
Table 1.1.3.B— Abbreviations, acronyms and terminology
Abbreviation/acronym/terminology
Description
BPM
base plate mounted
CBR
California bearing ratio
CGF
cumulative growth factor
CKC
concrete kerb and channel
DBH
diameter at breast height
DG
dense graded
DPC
damp proof course
DRAINS
is a hydrological model (see ILSAX), and hydrological model Stormwater drainage System design and analysis
DSS
desired standard of service
DWS
deck wearing surface
ESA
equivalent standard axles
ESC
erosion and sediment control
FOBOT
fibre optic break out tray
FWD
falling weight deflectometer
GI
galvanised iron
HED
high early discharge
HLP
heavy load platform
HML
higher mass limit
HREOC
Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission
HV
heavy vehicle
HWM
high water mark
IAP
intelligent access program
IDE
increased damage effect
ILSAX
a run-off routing hydrological model used for urban drainage analysis
LAT
lowest astronomical tide
LATM
local area traffic management
LATMD
local area traffic management devices
LIDAR
light detection and ranging or laser imaging detection and ranging
LSF
load safety factor
MUTCD
manual of uniform traffic control devices
NALL
Natural Asset Local Law
NFC
no-fines concrete
N/A
not applicable
OAA
open arcade asphalt
OGA
open graded asphalt
PAFC
polished aggregate fiction value
PMT
pad mounted transformer
PSD
permissible site discharge
PT
pole transformers
PVC
polyvinyl chloride
PWD
people with disabilities
QUDM
Queensland urban drainage manual
QMUTCD
Queensland manual of uniform traffic control devices
RAFTS
a run-off routing hydrological model for catchment hydrology
RCP
reinforced concrete pipe
RF
reliability factor
RORB
is a general run-off and stream-flow routing program used for catchment hydrology
RPDM
road planning and design manual
RSS
reinforced soil system
SAR
standard axle repetition
SBSMP
site based stormwater management plan
SMA
stone mastic asphalt
TGSI
tactile ground surface indicators
TLD
traffic load distribution
UPVC
unplasticised polyvinyl chloride
UVR
ultraviolet radiation
VPO
Vegetation Protection Order
WC
water closet
WSUD
water sensitive urban design

1.1.4 Standard drawings and reference specifications

1.1.4.1 Standard drawings

(1) Brisbane Standard Drawings identified in Table 1.1.4A form part of this planning scheme policy.
(2) Some Brisbane Standard Drawings are referenced in the planning scheme.
(3) Infrastructure design is to consider all relevant standard drawings, including those for related and interfacing infrastructure components.
Table 1.1.4.A—Standard drawings
Drawing Number
Title
Amendment
Revision Date
0000 Series – Preface
Index of standard drawings – Sheet 1
 
May 2014
Index of standard drawings – Sheet 2
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 01
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 02
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 03
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 04
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 05
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 06
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 07
 
May 2014
Amendment Register – Sheet 08 and Supplementary Notes
 
May 2014
1000 Series – General
Line styles and Lettering for Civil Engineering Drawings
B
September 2015
Drawing symbols
B
May 2014
Line styles and lettering for Civil Engineering Drawings
A
May 2014
Line styles and lettering for Structural Drawings
Proposed
 
Line styles and lettering for Landscaping Drawings
Proposed
 
Line styles and lettering for Building Services Drawings
Proposed
 
Line styles and lettering for Water Management Drawings
Proposed
 
Line styles and lettering for Intelligent Transport Systems Drawings
Proposed
 
Rectangular pit types
A
May 2014
Cable pit - Rectangular type lids
B
September 2015
Public utility corridors and alignments (4.25m wide verge)
C
February 2016
Public utility conduit sections (4.25m wide verge)
C
February 2016
Public utility corridors and alignments (3.75m wide verge)
B
September 2015
Public utility conduit sections (3.75m wide verge)
C
February 2016
Minor & industrial road corridors - 2 traffic lanes – Sheet 1 of 2
B
September 2015
Minor & industrial road corridors - 2 Traffic lanes – Sheet 2 of 2)
A
September 2015
Major road corridors - 2 Traffic lanes - Sheet 1 of 5
B
September 2015
Major road corridors - 4 Traffic lanes - Sheet 2 of 5
A
September 2015
Major road corridors - 6 Traffic lanes - Sheet 3 of 5
A
September 2015
Major road corridors - 4 Traffic lanes - Constrained corridor - Sheet 4 of 5
A
September 2015
Major road corridors - 6 Traffic lanes - Constrained corridor - Sheet 5 of 5
A
September 2015
2000 Series – Road Corridor
Kerb profiles
A
May 2014
Precast kerb blocks
A
May 2014
Double kerb – Asphaltic footpath only
A
May 2014
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Other than single dwelling and rear allotment access
C
January 2016
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Single dwelling
C
January 2016
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Grid crossing and invert modification
B
January 2016
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Grades (3.75m verge)
B
January 2016
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Grades (4.25m verge)
B
January 2016
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Rural property access culvert crossing table drains
B
January 2016
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Prohibited locations
Proposed
 
Vehicle crossing (driveway) – Single dwelling – Grass verge swale
A
January 2016
Pavement drains
B
January 2016
Trench restoration – Road crossing – Flexible pavements
B
January 2016
Trench restoration – Verges and paths
A
May 2014
Precast traffic island – Codes and details – Sheet 1 of 2
B
September 2015
Precast traffic island – Codes and details – Sheet 2 of 2
B
September 2015
Indented bus bay options standard crossfall
B
September 2015
Indented bus bay options adverse crossfall
B
January 2016
Premium bus stop
B
September 2015
Intermediate bus stop - Sheet 1 of 2
B
September 2015
Intermediate bus stop - In centres - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Regular bus stop - Without seat - Sheet 1 of 3
B
September 2015
Regular bus stop - With seat- Sheet 2 of 3
A
September 2015
Regular bus stop - In centres - Sheet 3 of 3
A
September 2015
Adshel ‘Mini’ bus shelter
A
May 2014
Adshel ‘Boulevard’ bus shelter
A
May 2014
Translink standard bus shelter typical layout
A
May 2014
Retaining walls - Stonepitched
A
May 2014
Retaining wall - Concrete block - Type 1 footing
A
May 2014
Retaining wall - Concrete block - Type 2 footing
A
May 2014
3000 Series – Traffic Management
Typical manoeuvring areas - Residential streets - Sheet 1 of 2
B
January 2016
Typical manoeuvring areas - Residential streets - Sheet 2 of 2
B
January 2016
Turning provisions for industrial access
A
May 2014
Typical passing lane treatments
A
May 2014
Turning template Acco 2350 side loading refuse vehicle
C
February 2016
Turning template Scania L94UB CR22L bus
A
May 2014
Turning template Volvo 10B bus
A
May 2014
Turning template Volvo B12 BLE 14.5m bus
A
May 2014
Turning template Acco 2350 rear loading PUP refuse vehicle - Sheet 1 of 2
B
February 2016
Turning template Acco 2350 rear loading RORO refuse vehicle - Sheet 2 of 2
B
February 2016
Turning template Acco 2350 front loading refuse vehicle
B
February 2016
Brisbane City Council kerbside allocation sign codes
B
September 2015
Street name plate setout (sign code G5-2)
B
September 2015
Brisbane City Council special sign code ‘A’
A
May 2014
Standard bus stop sign details
B
September 2015
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 18B/1L & 18S/1R
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes18Q+/1D & 18Q+D/20EL/1R
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 41ZD/61A.1S & 18Q+D/61G.1
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 20.1Q & 21.1
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 6.1 & 62.1
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 52E.1 & 62N.1
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 41ZR/52EL & 1ER/62NL
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 43 & 45 and bottom panels
A
May 2014
Parking regulation signs – Sign codes 41Z.1Z, 1GL/21WR & 43WY
A
May 2014
Pavement marking, longitudinal lines
A
May 2014
Pavement marking, transverse lines
A
May 2014
Pavement marking, typical minor road non-signalised intersection
A
May 2014
Raised pavement markers, standard installation for traffic lanes
A
May 2014
Raised pavement markers, standard installation for painted tails
A
May 2014
Raised pavement markers, standard installation for painted islands and medians
B
September 2015
Pavement markings, pavement arrows and give way symbol
A
May 2014
Pavement markings, merge arrows
A
May 2014
Pavement markings, pedestrian, rail & bike crossings and transit lanes
A
May 2014
Pavement markings, bus lane details
A
May 2014
Pavement marking - Typical - Parallel parking, bus stop and loading/taxi zone
C
January 2016
Passenger loading zone - Sheet 1 of 2
B
May 2016
Passenger and commercial loading - Sheet 2 of 2
A
May 2016
Pavement marking, centrelines on dual to single carriageways
A
May 2014
Pavement marking signalised pedestrian crossing
A
May 2014
Pavement markings signalised intersection crossing
A
May 2014
Coloured pavement threshold treatment general design and specification
A
May 2014
Pavement marking - School zone enhancement treatment
A
May 2014
Local traffic area - Brisbane City - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Roundabout - Central island with concrete apron
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Roundabout - Fully mountable AC plateau
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Intersection priority change - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Modified T junction - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Speed platform – Mid block - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Speed platform – Intersection - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Diamond slow way - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Angled slow way 1 lane – 1 way - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Angled slow way 2 lane – 2 way - General design criteria
B
January 2016
Local traffic area - Perimeter gateway - General design criteria
B
January 2016
4000 Series – Traffic Signals and Intelligent Transport Systems
Electrical cable clearances
A
May 2014
Mains connection to Energex equipment
A
May 2014
Traffic signal/lighting pole electricity supply warning labels
A
May 2014
General arrangement for access to cable joining pit (saw cut entry)
B
January 2016
Vehicle detector loop installation details
A
May 2014
Vehicle detector loop installation details general use & red-light cameras
B
January 2016
Vehicle detector loop installation details counting & bicycle loops
B
January 2016
Traffic signal ducts installation detail low voltage (240V) conduits
B
September 2015
Traffic signal ducts installation detail extra low voltage conduits
A
May 2014
Circular cable jointing pit 600 diameter - Pit
Proposed
 
Circular cable jointing pit 600 diameter - Collar
B
May 2016
Circular cable jointing pit 600 diameter - Cover
B
May 2016
Circular cable jointing pit 600 diameter – Cover fabrication – Sheet 2 of 2
Proposed
 
Replacement pit lid existing round to square pit types
A
May 2014
Controller base installation details
A
May 2014
Traffic signal post top assembly & lower mounting bracket - Sheet 1 of 2
B
May 2016
Traffic signal post top assembly - 36 core - Sheet 2 of 2
A
May 2016
Traffic signal junction box and earthing detail joint use pole - Sheet 1 of 2
B
May 2016
Traffic signal junction box - 36 core - Sheet 2 of 2
A
May 2016
Adjustable 'Z' bracket for 200mm lanterns
A
May 2014
Tee-bar strap for dual lanterns
A
May 2014
Mounting bracket for audio tactile housing on mast arms and Type 6 posts
A
May 2014
Lock washers
A
May 2014
Assembly detail of lock washers
A
May 2014
Cover plate assembly on mast arm
A
May 2014
LED Lantern Cable - Lantern end - Sheet 1 of 2
B
January 2016
LED Lantern Cable - Terminal block end - Sheet 2 of 2
B
January 2016
Traffic signal post & pole installation
A
May 2014
Post details
A
May 2014
Joint use column details (BCC type)
A
May 2014
Mast arm details 2.5 & 5.0m outreach (BCC type)
A
May 2014
Joint use traffic signal and road lighting pole (BCC type)
A
May 2014
Joint use traffic signal mast arm 2.5 & 5.0m outreach (Rate 2)
B
September 2015
8.5m outreach joint use mast arms baseplate mounted
A
May 2014
11.0m outreach joint use mast arms baseplate mounted
A
May 2014
Universal 1.5m camera outreach fabrication details
A
May 2014
Traffic camera mount options – Fab. details 3m pedestal extension
A
May 2014
Arm and bracket for cameras on VMS gantry Notes - Sheet 1 of 2
B
January 2016
Arm and bracket for cameras on VMS gantry - Fabrication details - Sheet 2 of 2
B
January 2016
Standard 4.1m signal pedestal footing details
B
February 2016
Ragbolt assemblies pedestal
B
May 2014
Spread footing details 4.1m traffic signal and 1.7m push button posts
A
May 2014
Ragbolt assemblies mast arm 2.5m & 5m outreach
A
May 2014
2.5m & 5.0m joint use mast arms footing details and notes
Proposed
 
8.5m & 11.0m joint use mast arms footing details and notes
A
May 2014
Ragbolt Assemblies for Joint Use Poles
Proposed
 
Joint Use Poles Footing Details & Notes
Proposed
 
Typical positioning of traffic signal components at intersections
B
September 2015
Typical positioning of traffic signal components at mid-block locations
B
September 2015
Standard traffic signals installation drawing sheet for 19 core cable
A
May 2014
Standard traffic signals installation drawing sheet for 29 core cable
A
May 2014
Standard traffic signals installation drawing sheet for 51 core cable
A
May 2014
Standard traffic signals installation drawing details sheet
B
September 2015
Controller terminal layout
A
May 2014
Dual rack controller top hat with equipment assembly
Proposed
 
Controller Door Details
A
September 2015
Controller Top Hat Door Details
A
September 2015
Bus post for variable message sign (20 character sign)
A
May 2014
VMS support structure Type BCCVC - Notes – Sheet 1 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVC - Notes – Sheet 2 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVC - Frame arrangement – Sheet 3 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVC - Frame details – Sheet 4 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVC - Footing details – Sheet 5 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVA - Notes – Sheet 1 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVA - Notes – Sheet 2 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVA - Frame arrangement – Sheet 3 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVA - Frame details – Sheet 4 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVA - Footing details – Sheet 5 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVB - Notes – Sheet 1 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVB - Notes – Sheet 2 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVB - Frame arrangement – Sheet 3 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVB - Frame details – Sheet 4 of 5
C
January 2016
VMS support structure Type BCCVB - Footing details – Sheet 5 of 5
C
January 2016
5000 Series – Pedestrian and Cyclist Facilities
Type 1 standard bikepath entrance – low volume paths
B
January 2016
Type 2 standard bikeway entrance – Options 1 & 2 – Sheet 1 of 2
B
January 2016
Type 2 standard bikeway entrance – Option 3 – Sheet 2 of 2
B
January 2016
Bikepath furniture details
B
January 2016
Bikepath slowdown control (reverse curve)
A
May 2014
Bikepath slowdown control (offset chicane)
A
May 2014
Shared path - construction and maintenance site management
A
May 2014
Standard bikepath typical high and low use network connections
A
May 2014
Single bike rack – Sheet 1 of 2
A
May 2014
Single bike rack – Sheet 2 of 2 – Installation
A
May 2014
Multi bike rack – Sheet 1 of 3
B
January 2016
Multi bike rack – Details – Sheet 2 of 3
B
January 2016
Multi bike rack – Installation – Sheet 3 of 3
B
January 2016
Bike lane pavement markings (on road bike lanes)
B
January 2016
Bike lane widths on carriageway
B
May 2016
Bike lane - markings at bus stops
B
May 2016
Bike lanes at signalised intersection, left turn slip lane
A
May 2014
Bike lane- commencement and termination details
B
May 2016
Bike lanes, roundabouts, lanes on all approaches
A
May 2014
Concrete footpath 1.2m wide
A
May 2014
Concrete footpath full width
A
May 2014
Concrete footpaths width requirements
B
September 2015
Provision for tree roots under concrete footpaths and bike paths
B
January 2016
Elevated walkway with and without handrail
A
May 2014
Concrete pavement joint details & service pit lids
A
May 2014
Concrete footpath decorative sawcut – Sheet 1 of 4
C
January 2016
Cconcrete footpath decorative sawcut – Sheet 2 of 4
C
January 2016
Cconcrete footpath decorative sawcut – Sheet 3 of 4
C
January 2016
Cconcrete footpath decorative sawcut – Sheet 4 of 4
C
January 2016
Bikepath pavement joints
A
May 2014
Root protection adjacent to concrete bikepaths
A
May 2014
Pavers – General details
A
May 2014
Paver banding and concrete banding
A
May 2014
Path - Concrete and exposed aggregate
B
September 2015
Path – Deco
A
May 2014
Path – Asphalt
A
May 2014
Path – Coloured aggregate spray seal
A
May 2014
Walking track
A
May 2014
Directional TGSI/wayfinding trails - Permanent clearances - Sheet 1 of 2
B
September 2015
Directional TGSI/wayfinding trails - Temporary diversions - Sheet 2 of 2
B
September 2015
Tactile ground surface indicator detail
A
September 2015
Kerb ramp
A
May 2014
Island pedestrian access
A
May 2014
Typical kerb ramp and traffic signal pedestal location
A
May 2014
Pedestrian facilities at traffic island ramps and slots
A
May 2014
School crossing flag, post and bracket
A
May 2014
School crossing supervised
A
May 2014
Children's crossing supervised - with integrated or non-integrated kerb build-outs
A
May 2014
Children's crossing with pedestrian crossing (zebra) supervised
A
May 2014
Children's crossing with pedestrian crossing (zebra) supervised - with integrated or non-integrated kerb build-outs
A
May 2014
Children's crossing with pedestrian refuge supervised
A
May 2014
Pedestrian refuge with kerb buildouts
A
May 2014
Pedestrian refuge provision at zebra crossing
A
May 2014
Road Network guidelines pedestrian refuge supplementary details - Sheet 1 of 2
B
September 2015
Road Network guidelines pedestrian refuge supplementary details - Sheet 2 of 2
B
September 2015
Pedestrian refuge general design criteria
C
February 2016
Stairway - reinforced concrete
A
May 2014
Steps - concrete and timber
A
May 2014
Steps - concrete
A
May 2014
7000 Series – Fences, Barriers and Public Furniture
Fence - Galvanised tubular handrail
A
May 2014
Fence - Galvanised weldmesh fencing
A
May 2014
Fence - 1.8m high chainwire
A
May 2014
Fence - Pedestrian safety
A
May 2014
Fence - Two rail, steel hollow section post and rail
A
May 2014
Bicycle friendly galvanised tubular handrail - Sheet 1 of 2
B
September 2015
Bicycle friendly galvanised tubular handrail - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Fence - Dog off leash area
A
May 2014
Fence - Natural area - Three rail
A
September 2015
Fence - Natural area - Chainwire fauna exclusion fence - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Fence - Natural area - Chainwire fauna exclusion fence - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Fence - Natural area - Chainwire fauna friendly fence
A
September 2015
Fence - Natural area - Chainwire handrail
A
September 2015
Fence - Log barrier (600mm high)
B
February 2016
Fence - Parks - Dressed hardwood barrier
A
May 2014
Noise barrier fence 2.0m high - Post and paling
B
February 2016
Noise barrier fence 2.0m high - Post and board
B
February 2016
Gates - Dog off leash area - General notes - Sheet 1 of 2
B
February 2016
Gates - Dog off leash area - Sheet 2 of 2
Interim Release
May 2014
Gate - Natural area - Pedestrian entry - Sheet 1 of 3 - General notes
A
September 2015
Gate - Natural area - Pedestrian entry - Sheet 2 of 3 - Details
A
September 2015
Gate - Natural area - Pedestrian entry - Sheet 3 of 3 - Details
A
September 2015
Gate - Natural area - Pedestrian entry with shelter - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Gate – Natural area – Pedestrian entry with shelter – Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Entrance barriers - General notes
A
May 2014
Entrance barrier - Single swing gate
Proposed
 
Entrance barrier - Double swing gate
A
May 2014
Entrance barrier - Lockrail with steel posts
A
May 2014
Entrance barrier - Lockrail with timber posts
A
May 2014
Vehicle access gate - Natural area - Light duty
A
September 2015
Vehicle access gate - Natural area - Medium duty
A
September 2015
Vehicle access gate - Natural area - Heavy duty
A
September 2015
Gate - Natural area - Locking boxes - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Gate - Natural area - Locking boxes - Sheet 2 of 2 - Details
A
September 2015
Entrance barrier - Natural area - Small horse stile
A
September 2015
Entrance barrier -Natural area - Large horse stile - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Entrance barrier - Natural area - Large horse stile - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Energy absorbing bollard guardrail end terminal & hazard protection
A
May 2014
Park bollards and boundary markers - General notes
A
May 2014
Bollard - Parks - heritage, angle and dome-topped
A
May 2014
Bollard - Parks and natural areas - Removable
A
May 2014
Streetscape fixed bollard - Sheet 1 of 2
B
February 2016
Streetscape fixed bollard - Assembly - Sheet 2 of 2
B
February 2016
Streetscape removable bollard - Sheet 1 of 6
B
February 2016
Streetscape removable bollard - Assembly - Sheet 2 of 6
B
February 2016
Streetscape removable bollard - Base - Sheet 3 of 6 -
B
February 2016
Streetscape removable bollard - Cover - Sheet 4 of 6
B
February 2016
Streetscape removable bollard - Spring - Sheet 5 of 6 -
B
February 2016
Streetscape removable bollard - Installation - Sheet 6 of 6
B
February 2016
Streetscape - Fixed and removable bollard - Bollard logo badge
B
February 2016
Road edge guide posts
A
May 2014
Traffic signs and meter standards
A
May 2014
Standard seat - Assembly - Sheet 1 of 10
C
February 2016
Standard seat - Frame assembly - Sheet 2 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Outer spine (right) - Sheet 3 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Inner spine - Sheet 4 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Outer spine (left) - Sheet 5 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Foot - Sheet 6 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Rail - Sheet 7 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Timber slats - Sheet 8 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Logo badge - Sheet 9 of 10
B
February 2016
Standard seat - Installation - Sheet 10 of 10
B
February 2016
Public transport seat - Assembly - Sheet 1 of 10
C
February 2016
Public transport seat - Frame assembly - Sheet 2 of 10
C
February 2016
Public transport seat - Outer spine (right)- Sheet 3 of 10
C
February 2016
Public transport seat - Inner spine - Sheet 4 of 10
B
February 2016
Public transport seat - Outer spine (left) - Sheet 5 of 10
C
February 2016
Public transport seat - Foot - Sheet 6 of 10
B
February 2016
Public transport seat - Rail - Sheet 7 of 10
C
February 2016
Public transport seat - Timber slats - Sheet 8 of 10
B
February 2016
Public transport seat - Logo badge - Sheet 9 of 10
B
February 2016
Public transport seat - Installation - Sheet 10 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Assembly - Sheet 1 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Frame assembly - Sheet 2 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Outer spine (right) - Sheet 3 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Inner spine - Sheet 4 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Outer spine (left) - Sheet 5 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Foot - Sheet 6 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Rail - Sheet 7 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Timber slats - Sheet 8 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench - Logo badge - Sheet 9 of 10
B
February 2016
Bench – Installation – Sheet 10 of 10
B
February 2016
Urban stool – Sheet 1 of 5
B
February 2016
Urban stool – Assembly – Sheet 2 of 5
B
February 2016
Urban stool – Anchor – Sheet 3 of 5
B
February 2016
Urban stool – Cap – Sheet 4 of 5
B
February 2016
Urban stool – Installation – Sheet 5 of 5
B
February 2016
Stainless Steel - 240L - Alternate Aspect - Bin Unit Design - Sheet 1 of 2
C
February 2016
Stainless Steel - 240L - Alternate Aspect - Bin Unit Design - Sheet 2 of 2
C
February 2016
Anodised - 240L-Alternate Aspect – Bin Unit Design - Sheet 1 of 2
C
February 2016
Anodised - 240L-Alternate Aspect – Bin Unit Design - Sheet 2 of 2
C
February 2016
Mini bin – Assembly – Sheet 1 of 5
B
February 2016
Mini bin – Frame – Sheet 2 of 5
B
February 2016
Mini bin – Side panel – Sheet 3 of 5
B
February 2016
Mini bin – Door – Sheet 4 of 5
B
February 2016
Mini bin – Installation – Sheet 5 of 5
B
February 2016
Parks wheelie bin enclosure
A
May 2014
Stainless Steel - 340L - Alternate Aspect - Bin Unit Design - Sheet 1 of 2
Proposed
 
Stainless Steel - 340L - Alternate Aspect - Bin Unit Design - Sheet 2 of 2
Proposed
 
Anodised - 340L - Alternate Aspect-Bin Unit Design - Sheet 1 of 2
Proposed
 
Anodised - 340L – Alternate Aspect-Bin Unit Design - Sheet 2 of 2
Proposed
 
Drinking fountain – Sheet 1 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Assembly – Sheet 2 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Plumbing – Sheet 3 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Body – Sheet 4 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Body details – Sheet 5 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Body flat pattern – Sheet 6 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Top plate – Sheet 7 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Actuator arm – Sheet 8 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Actuator – Sheet 9 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Access panel – Sheet 10 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Mouth piece – Sheet 11 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Actuator arm bush – Sheet 12 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Actuator bush – Sheet 13 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Installation – Sheet 14 of 23
C
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Body auxiliary views – Sheet 15 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Bottle refill actuator – Sheet 16 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Bottle refill outlet – Sheet 17 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Vertical drain plate – Sheet 18 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Vertical basin – Sheet 19 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Valve mount – Sheet 20 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Valve mount – Sheet 21 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Logo badge – Sheet 22 of 23
B
February 2016
Drinking fountain – Bill of materials – Sheet 23 of 23
B
February 2016
8000 Series – Stormwater Drainage and Water Quality
Minimum pipe cover for construction loads – Steel reinforced concrete pipes
A
May 2014
Minimum pipe cover for construction loads – Fibre reinforced concrete pipes
A
May 2014
Construction loading typical detail requirements for long section drawings
A
May 2014
Bedding methods for rigid and flexible drainage pipes
A
May 2014
Deflection joint for concrete pipes
A
May 2014
Stormwater maintenance hole details 1050 to 1500 diameter - to 3.0m deep
B
February 2016
Maintenance hole roof slab 1350 to 1950 diameter
A
May 2014
Maintenance hole roof slabs 1980 diameter extended 600 and 900
B
February 2016
Reinforced concrete roof slabs for maintenance hole chambers
B
February 2016
Maintenance hole frame (roadway and non-roadway) 1050 to 1500 diameter
B
February 2016
Riser details (roadway)
A
May 2014
Maintenance hole cover (roadway) 1050 to 1500 diameter
B
February 2016
Maintenance hole cover (non-roadway) 1050 to 1500 diameter
B
February 2016
Maintenance hole cover concrete infill (pedestrian traffic) 1050 to 1500 diameter
B
February 2016
Type ‘A’ gully lip in line
B
December 2015
Type ‘A’ gully kerb in line
B
December 2015
Type ‘A’ gully grate
A
May 2014
Type ‘A’ gully grate frame
A
May 2014
Type 'A' gully (extended kerb inlet) precast concrete lintel (extended kerb inlet)
A
May 2014
Type 'A' anti-ponding gully
A
May 2014
Type ‘E’ gully (city type)
A
May 2014
Type ‘E’ gully grates and frame (city type)
A
May 2014
Surcharge gully
A
May 2014
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully on grade, type ‘D’ K&C, 2400mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully on grade, type ‘D’ K&C, 3600mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully on grade, type ‘D’ K&C, 4800mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully on grade, type ‘E’ K&C, 2400mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully on grade, type ‘E’ K&C, 3600mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully on grade, type ‘E’ K&C, 4800mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully, sag conditions, type ‘D’ K&C, all lintels
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, lip in line gully, sag conditions, type ‘E’ K&C, all lintels
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, kerb in line gully on grade, type ‘D’/’E’ K&C, 2400mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, kerb in line gully on grade, type ‘D’/’E’ K&C, 3600mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, kerb in line gully on grade, type ‘D’/’E’ K&C, 4800mm lintel
B
February 2016
Hydraulic capture charts, kerb in line gully, sag conditions, type ‘D’/‘E’ K&C, all lintels
B
February 2016
Field inlets type 1 and type 2
A
May 2014
Field inlet dome top cover
B
February 2016
Drain – Inlet pit with grate
A
May 2014
Inlets and outlets (concrete) stormwater drains
A
May 2014
Inlets and outlets (stonepitched) stormwater drains
A
May 2014
Expansion and contraction joints for concrete lined open channels
A
May 2014
Quantities for inlets and outlets
A
May 2014
Roofwater drainage for low density residential subdivisions
A
May 2014
Roofwater inspection maintenance holes for low density residential subdivisions
A
May 2014
Roof and surface water drainage for site developments
A
May 2014
Roofwater drainage connection (kerb adaptor installation)
A
May 2014
Kerb adaptor testing jig construction details
A
May 2014
Roadside swale types and typical sections
B
September 2015
Grass swale (verge type) – Typical layout
B
September 2015
Grass swale – Underdrain details
B
September 2015
Grass swale – Field inlet details
B
September 2015
Bioretention swale – Underdrain details
B
September 2015
Bioretention swale – field inlet details
A
May 2014
Bioretention swale (median type) – Field inlet details
B
September 2015
Swale – Carpark bio-retention
A
May 2014
Swale – Carpark bio-retention with landscaping
A
May 2014
Swale – Turf, gravel and dry creek
A
May 2014
WSUD bioretention pod (verge type) – Layout
C
February 2016
WSUD bioretention pod (verge type) – Typical details
B
February 2016
WSUD bioretention pod (kerb buildout type) – Layout
B
February 2016
WSUD bioretention pod (kerb buildout type) – Typical details
B
February 2016
9000 Series – Streetscape and Landscape
Tree planting within turf areas to footpath
A
May 2014
Tree planting in pavement areas to footpath
A
May 2014
Tree with companion planting bed to footpath
A
May 2014
Podium planter details – Trees on podium detail
A
May 2014
Tree planting within turf areas to medians
A
May 2014
Tree and garden planting to medians
A
May 2014
Tree pit with grate
A
May 2014
Tree with porous paving
A
May 2014
Tree trench – Type 1 suspended slab
A
May 2014
Tree trench – Type 2 suspended slab
A
May 2014
Tree trench – Type 3 structural cells
A
May 2014
WSUD typical tree pit with grate
C
February 2016
WSUD tree within turf – Plan
A
May 2014
WSUD tree within turf – Section
A
May 2014
WSUD precast kerb inlet
Proposed
 
Planting - General notes – Sheet 1 of 2
Proposed
 
Planting - General notes – Sheet 1 of 2
A
May 2014
Planting – Planting media profiles (turf and garden)
A
May 2014
Planting – Typical tree, shrub & tubestock
A
May 2014
Planting – Typical tree, shrub & tubestock on embankment
A
May 2014
Planting – Carparks
A
May 2014
Edging - General notes - Sheet 1 of 3
B
February 2016
Edging – Edging options – Sheet 2 of 3
B
February 2016
Edging – Edging options – Sheet 3 of 3
B
February 2016
Edging - Typical interfaces
Interim Release
May 2014
Tree grate – Setout plan – Sheet 1 of 3
B
February 2016
Tree grate – Details – Sheet 2 of 3
B
February 2016
Tree grate – Sub-frame details – Sheet 3 of 3
C
February 2016
Tree guard – Assembly – Sheet 1 of 8
B
February 2016
Tree guard – No 1 upright – Sheet 2 of 8
B
February 2016
Tree guard – No 2 upright – Sheet 3 of 8
B
February 2016
Tree guard – No 3 upright – Sheet 4 of 8
B
February 2016
Tree guard – No 4 upright – Sheet 5 of 8
B
February 2016
Tree guard – Panel – Sheet 6 of 8
B
February 2016
Tree guard – Logo panel – Sheet 7 of 8
B
February 2016
Tree guard – Installation – Sheet 8 of 8
B
February 2016
Critical root zone
A
May 2014
Root deflector installation adjacent to existing road and structures
A
May 2014
Installation of service trench adjacent to a tree
A
May 2014
Guidelines for gantry treatments at tree locations
A
May 2014
Retaining wall – sleeper
A
May 2014
Retaining wall – boulder
A
May 2014
Free-standing stone wall
A
May 2014
10000 Series – Park and Natural Area Facilities
Parks and Natural Areas – Standard drawings – General notes
Proposed
 
Notes on Park drawings and alternate series locations
Proposed
 
Park infrastructure suppliers
A
May 2014
Picnic node - Siting plan
A
May 2014
Bench seat – Natural area
A
September 2015
Bench seat with backrest – Natural area
A
September 2015
Picnic table – Sheet 1 of 2 – General notes
Proposed
 
Picnic table – Sheet 2 of 2
Proposed
 
Picnic table – Wheelchair accessible
Proposed
 
Picnic table – Natural area
A
September 2015
Picnic table – Natural area – Setout detail
A
September 2015
Platform table
Proposed
 
Platform table – Natural area
B
September 2015
Hip roof shelters - Park - Structural notes (Page 1 of 2) - Sheet 1 of 7
C
February 2016
Hip roof shelters - Park - Structural notes (Page 2 of 2) - Sheet 2 of 7
C
February 2016
Hip roof shelters - Park - Square shelters - Plan and details - Sheet 3 of 7
C
February 2016
Hip roof shelters - Park - Rectangular shelters - Plan and details - Sheet 4 of 7
C
February 2016
Hip roof shelters - Park - Optional annex - Plan and details - Sheet 5 of 7
C
February 2016
Hip roof shelters - Park - Details - Sheet 6 of 7
C
February 2016
Hip roof shelters - Park - Details - Sheet 7 of 7
C
February 2016
Skillion Roof Shelter - Park - Structural notes (Page 1 of 2) - Sheet 1 of 5
C
February 2016
Skillion Roof Shelter - Park - Structural notes (Page 2 of 2)- Sheet 2 of 5
C
February 2016
Skillion Roof Shelter - Park - Plan and details - Sheet 3 of 5
C
February 2016
Skillion Roof Shelter - Park - Details - Sheet 4 of 5
C
February 2016
Skillion Roof Shelter - Park - Details - Sheet 5 of 5
C
February 2016
Roof Shelters - Park - Hybrid lightning protection system
B
February 2016
Small Shelter - Natural area - Plan - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Small Shelter – Natural area - Elevation and section - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Medium/large shelter - Natural area - Plan - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Medium/large shelter - Natural area - Elevation and section - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Large shelter - Natural area - Plan - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Large shelter - Natural area - Elevation and section - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Small information shelter - Natural area
B
February 2016
Small/Medium/Large shelters - Natural area - General notes - Sheet 1 of 5
A
September 2015
Small/Medium/Large shelters - Natural area - General notes - Sheet 2 of 5
A
September 2015
Small/Medium/Large shelters - Natural area - Details - Sheet 3 of 5
A
September 2015
Small/Medium/Large shelters - Natural area - Screen details - Sheet 4 of 5
A
September 2015
Small/Medium/Large shelters - Natural area - Screen details - Sheet 5 of 5
A
September 2015
Sign shelter - Natural area - General notes - Sheet 1 of 3
A
September 2015
Sign shelter - Natural area - Plan - Sheet 2 of 3
A
September 2015
Sign shelter - Natural area - Section and elevation - Sheet 3 of 3
A
September 2015
Barbeque shelter - Natural area - General notes - Sheet 1 of 3
A
September 2015
Barbeque shelter - Natural area - Plan - Sheet 2 of 3
A
September 2015
Barbeque shelter - Natural area - Elevation and section - Sheet 3 of 3
A
September 2015
Basketball halfcourt - General notes - Sheet 1 of 2
B
February 2016
Basketball halfcourt - Plans and post details - Sheet 2 of 2
B
February 2016
Cricket practice net – Plans and sections – Sheet 1 of 3
B
February 2016
Cricket pitch – Plans and sections – Sheet 2 of 3
B
February 2016
Cricket pitch and nets – Notes and specifications – Sheet 3 of 3
B
February 2016
Tennis rebound wall - General notes - Sheet 1 of 3
B
February 2016
Tennis rebound wall - Plan - Sheet 2 of 3
B
February 2016
Tennis rebound wall – Section – Sheet 3 of 3
B
February 2016
Fish cleaning table - Notes and elevation - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Fish cleaning table - Details - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
General arrangement/layout for dog off leash areas
A
May 2014
Dog refuse bin
A
May 2014
Taps – general notes
Proposed
 
Taps – Water tap and bubbler with dog bowl
A
May 2014
Taps – Maintenance
A
May 2014
Bushfire water supply shelter type 1 - Natural area - Notes - Sheet 1 of 3
A
September 2015
Bushfire water supply shelter type 1 - Natural area - Plan - Sheet 2 of 3
A
September 2015
Bushfire water supply shelter type 1 - Natural area - Details - Sheet 3 of 3
A
September 2015
Bushfire water supply shelter type 2 - Natural area - Notes - Sheet 1 of 3
A
September 2015
Bushfire water supply shelter type 2 - Natural area - Plan - Sheet 2 of 3
A
September 2015
Bushfire water supply shelter type 2 - Natural area - Details - Sheet 3 of 3
A
September 2015
Bushfire water supply shelter - Natural area - Overhead filler
A
September 2015
Horse trough - Natural area - Plan and notes
A
September 2015
Local playgrounds – Siting plan
A
May 2014
Playground design principals
A
May 2014
Playground undersurfacing
A
May 2014
Undersurfacing – Wet pour rubber
Proposed
 
Undersurfacing – Artificial turf
Proposed
 
Undersurfacing – Soft fall materials (sand, rubber, bark)
Proposed
 
Park Signage - General Structural Notes - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Park Signage - General Structural Notes - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Parks Signage - Typical Installation Details and Notes
A
September 2015
Parks Signage - Graphic Notes
A
September 2015
Parks Signage - Standard Sizes and Example Layouts
A
September 2015
Park Podium Interpretive Signage
A
September 2015
Park signage - Ordinance
A
September 2015
Park signage pictogram suite - Sheet 1 of 2
A
September 2015
Park signage pictogram suite - Sheet 2 of 2
A
September 2015
Park Node Signage - General Notes - Sheet 1 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Node Signage - Graphic Notes - Sheet 2 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Node Signage - Example Layouts - Sheet 3 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Node Signage - Dog Off Leash Sign Detail - Sheet 4 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Directional Signage - Typical Installation Details - Sheet 1 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Directional Signage - Graphic Notes - Sheet 2 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Directional Signage - Graphic Setout Details - Sheet 3 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Directional Signage - Typical Layouts - Sheet 4 of 4
A
September 2015
Park Name Signage – General Structural Notes – Sheet 1 of 6
A
September 2015
Park Name Signage – General Structural Notes – Sheet 2 of 6
A
September 2015
Park Name Signage – Graphic Notes – Sheet 3 of 6
A
September 2015
Park Name Signage – Graphic Setout Details – Sheet 4 of 6
A
September 2015
Park Name Signage – Horizontal - Standard – Sheet 5 of 6
A
September 2015
Park Name Signage – Vertical - Alternative – Sheet 6 of 6
A
September 2015
Descriptive sign - Natural area - Entry sign - Sheet 1 of 3
A
September 2015
Descriptive sign - Natural area - Name sign - Sheet 2 of 3
A
September 2015
Descriptive sign - Natural area – Sign Layout - Sheet 3 of 3
A
September 2015
Advisory sign - Natural area - Wayfinding
A
September 2015
Advisory sign - Natural area – Totem
A
September 2015
Advisory sign - Natural area - Track commencement - Sheet 1 of 2 - A1
A
September 2015
Advisory sign - Natural area - Track commencement - Sheet 2 of 2 - A2
A
September 2015
Advisory sign - Natural area - Directional
A
September 2015
Interpretive sign - Natural area - Trackside
A
September 2015
Toilet block – Siting plan
A
May 2014
Internal asphalt road/car park
A
May 2014
11000 Series – Electrical Facilities and Installations
Pedestrian lighting main switchboard and control panel arrangement and schematic
A
May 2014
Pedestrian lighting control panel arrangement and schematic
A
May 2014
Pedestrian lighting M6 earthing stud detail and light sire component schedule
A
May 2014
Light pole – Assembly – Sheet 1 of 6
B
February 2016
Light pole – Body – Sheet 2 of 6
B
February 2016
Light pole – Access panel – Sheet 3 of 6
B
February 2016
Light pole – Pipe reducer – Sheet 4 of 6
B
February 2016
Light pole – Logo badge – Sheet 5 of 6
B
February 2016
Light pole – Installation – Sheet 6 of 6
B
February 2016
Typical requirements for lighting of off-road shared & bicycle paths
A
May 2014
Typical requirements for solar LED markers: off-road shared/bicycle paths
A
May 2014
Park switchboard – Specifications – Sheet 1 of 7
Proposed
 
Park switchboard – Schematics – Sheet 2 of 7
Proposed
 
Park switchboard – Type A greater than 100Amps events – Sheet 3 of 7
Proposed
 
Park switchboard – Type B & C less than 100Amps events – Sheet 4 of 7
Proposed
 
Park switchboard – Type B & C less than 100Amps details – Sheet 5 of 7
Proposed
 
Park switchboard – Type B & C less than 100Amps foundations – Sheet 6 of 7
Proposed
 
Park switchboard – Type B & C less than 100Amps gravity door – Sheet 7 of 7
Proposed
 
BBQs – General
Proposed
 
Gas BBQ
Proposed
 
BCC Standard Electric Single BBQ - Sheet 1 of 4
B
February 2016
BCC Standard Electric Double BBQ - Sheet 2 of 4
B
February 2016
BCC Standard BBQ Switch boxes section & side view - Sheet 3 of 4
Interim Release
May 2014
BCC Standard BBQ Switch boxes equipment & CCT layout - Sheet 4 of 4
Interim Release
May 2014

1.1.4.2 Reference specifications

(1) Reference specifications identified in Table 1.1.4.B form part of this planning scheme policy.
(2) Reference specifications are referenced in the planning scheme.
(3) Infrastructure design is to consider all relevant reference specifications, including those for related and interfacing infrastructure components.
Table 1.1.4.B—Reference specifications
Specification Number
Specification Title
Revision Number
Revision Date
General Requirements
1.0
Dec 2001
Quality
3.0
May 2016
Earthworks
3.0
May 2016
Installation and Maintenance of Utility Services
2.0
May 2016
Roadworks
5.0
May 2016
Traffic Signs and Associated Roadside Furniture
2.0
May 2016
Traffic Signs and Pavement Marking
2.0
May 2016
Solar Road and Bikeway Markers
2.0
May 2016
Drainage
5.0
May 2016
Stonework
2.0
May 2016
Unit Paving
2.0
May 2016
Landscaping
2.0
May 2016
Concrete Work
3.0
May 2016
Centres Honed Concrete Paths
2.0
May 2016
Concrete Path Articulated Joint System
2.0
May 2016
Masonry
2.0
May 2016
Woodwork
2.0
May 2016
Structural Steel
2.0
May 2016
Coatings
2.0
May 2016
Quarry Products
3.0
May 2016
Supply of Dense Graded Asphalt
2.0
May 2016
Laying of Asphalt
2.0
May 2016
Bituminous Surfacing
2.0
May 2016
Polymer Modified Emulsion Surface Treatment
2.0
May 2016
Polymer Modified Emulsion Micro-Surfacing Treatment
2.0
May 2016
Traffic Signal Hardware – Pits & Lids
2.0
May 2016
Traffic Signal Hardware – Poles, Mast Arms & Columns
2.0
May 2016
Traffic Signal Hardware – Rag Bolts
2.0
May 2016

1.2 Application of Chapter 1

(1) This chapter of the planning scheme policy states the following for all types of infrastructure:
(a) advice about satisfying assessment criteria in the planning scheme;
(b) the information that the Council may request to be supplied for a development application.
(2) Users are referred to this chapter as a starting point in order to determine the necessary inputs and information to support, document and endorse infrastructure design elements.

1.3 Infrastructure design reports

1.3.1 General

(1) This section provides guidance for applicants in the preparation of an infrastructure design report to support a development application and other related requirements.
(2) A suitably qualified Registered Professional Engineer Queensland must certify all engineering-related aspects of the submission.

1.3.2 Infrastructure design report

(1) All reports must include the following information in addition to other identified reporting requirements:
(a) the property address, site details and development name (if applicable);
(b) details of any previous or associated reports or approvals including development application reference numbers;
(c) objectives and purpose of the report;
(d) a description of the development proposal and background details;
(e) a description of the assessment methodology used, including justification and any limitations or assumptions and the accuracy of the data;
(f) discussion of any sensitivity analyses undertaken for the proposal, including identification and justification of the adopted parameters or results;
(g) the author’s name and qualifications and signed/certified by a suitably qualified Registered Professional Engineer Queensland or accredited specialist;
(h) the date and version number of the report clearly presented on a document control page at the start of the report;
(i) conclusions that summarise the analysis results and findings and any impacts created by the proposal, including a clear statement as to why the proposed development should be approved or refused;
(j) a listing of all references used, and if the reference is obscure, relevant sections of the source material must be included;
(k) a locality plan;
(l) a site plan describing the site in its existing state;
(m) a proposal plan describing the proposed works, including staging.
(2) Site plans and proposal plans must show and clearly distinguish between existing and proposed ground levels and surface treatments, and the source of ground survey data is to be clearly identified.
(3) The level of detail required to describe the proposed works varies depending on the type of development approval sought.
(4) Reports submitted in support of applications for operational work or building work must refer to engineering drawings that define the proposed works.
(5) Requirements for engineering drawings are stated in section 1.5.

1.3.3 Geotechnical assessment

The report covers stability and erodility issues, including, but not limited to:

(a) Visual aspects of the site.
(b) Conditions of the area.
(c) Soil characterisation.
(d) Probability of slip failure.
(e) Factor of safety.
(f) Impacts of development on surface water runoff.
(g) Measures to mitigate soil movement.
(h) Recommendations.

1.4 Hydrologic and hydraulic assessments and models

1.4.1 General

(1) Hydrologic and hydraulic assessments are required to support a development application where the applicant is required to estimate catchment flows, flood levels and demonstrate that the development and any flood mitigation works would not adversely impact on flooding to upstream, downstream or adjacent premises.
(2) The assessment must be supervised and certified by a Registered Professional Engineer Queensland with demonstrated expertise in hydrology, hydraulic modelling and stormwater engineering.
(3) Copyright for designs, models, data and studies to be granted to Council.
(4) The impact of staging works is to be incorporated to ensure adequate flood immunity is provided.
(5) Basic report requirements:
(a) references;
(b) justified methodology and use of model, model type;
(c) sensitivity analysis and parameters;
(d) verification of results (alternate method/quick checks).

1.4.2 Hydrologic and hydraulic assessment report

(1) The report must include (where applicable):
(a) a site survey plan showing the location of buildings and underground stormwater infrastructure (line and level);
(b) a catchment plan detailing internal and external drainage catchments and their respective areas;
(c) the location, final surface levels and details of drainage easements associated with underground drainage, open channel drainage and overland flow paths;
(d) a scaled drawing showing the model layout (cross sections) or digital elevation model (DEM) over a cadastral background, also noting details of relevant structures (hydraulic controls);
(e) scaled drawings showing a comparison of existing and proposed extents of flood inundation;
(f) flood afflux and Manning’s roughness maps, when using 2D-modelling techniques;
(g) detailed plans for any proposed waterway structures;
(h) detailed earthworks plans for any channel works and flow-path modifications proposed by the development;
(i) the location of waterway corridors;
(j) cross-sections of existing and proposed embankments, spillways and any other inlet and outlet structures;
(k) location of public utilities;
(l) the impact of storm surge and climate change consistent with Australian Rainfall and Runoff and Queensland Urban Drainage Manual Guidelines;
(m) maps showing:
(i) depth x velocity
(ii) depth of inundation.

1.4.3 Choice of models

(1) Mathematical modelling software packages that are considered 'industry standard' in Australia is acceptable.
(2) The choice of model must be appropriate for the type of analysis and the complexity of the site or drainage network being modelled.

1.4.4 2D flood modelling techniques

(1) Hydraulic conveyance is a measure of the flow carrying capacity of a watercourse and is a function of the geometry and surface impedance of that watercourse. The loss of conveyance from obstruction or filling is usually characterised by increases in flood levels upstream.
(2) Mathematical models are used to assess the impacts on flood flow conveyance when adverse impacts are being assessed such as the HEC-RAS steady/unsteady state hydraulic model or MIKE-11 hydrodynamic model.
(3) As floodwaters flowing in a watercourse rise during a flood event and overtop banks, a portion of floodwaters is transferred into storage areas of the floodplain where the flow velocities are small in comparison with the main channel. The loss of critical flood storage from obstruction or filling is usually characterised by increases in flow velocities and flood levels downstream. Mathematical models that are appropriate to assess the impacts of flood and flood storage are to be fully dynamic 1D/2D hydraulic models such as MIKEFLOOD, Mike-21, SOBEK and TUFLOW.
(4) A 2D-modelling technique is used where flow paths cannot be adequately represented using 1D-modelling techniques which is often the case with overland flow flooding or where demonstrating the impacts of proposals that impact on flood storage or where compensatory earthworks are required.
(5) The use of LIDAR survey will be acceptable for such analysis, particularly for areas outside of the subject site where it can be demonstrated to be of adequate accuracy. However, critical hydraulic controls must be surveyed. Where sections of the floodplain contain channels that could be represented by 1D-modelling techniques it is desirable to use an integrated 1D/2D-modelling technique where survey cross-sections can be integrated into the 2D grid.
(6) Where the survey is converted into a DEM for use in a 2D hydraulic model, the grid size of 2D models must be selected to meet the objectives of the study which may include suitable simulation times, appropriate hydraulic resolution of key areas and flow conditions. The adopted grid size must be justified.
(7) At a minimum, all 2D flood analysis of existing and developed conditions must provide for:
(a) a map of DEM showing any obstructions/blockages;
(b) a Manning’s roughness map;
(c) flood depth maps with velocity vectors to visually indicate the conveyance versus storage areas of the floodplain;
(d) flood afflux maps to show flood level impacts;
(e) depth x velocity maps and depth of inundation maps to show areas of low and high hazard;
(f) overland flows with all openings clear of debris and overland flows when openings less than 3m x 5m are 100% blocked.

1.4.5 Hydrological model parameters and assumptions

(1) The report must justify the basis of the values adopted for the hydrologic modelling parameters used in the analysis.
(2) Parameters to be considered include, but are not limited to:
(a) rainfall loss values;
(b) sub-catchment fraction imperviousness (development assumptions);
(c) flow velocity and time of concentration estimates;
(d) Manning’s ‘n’ roughness values in relation to land use;
(e) structure capacity and hydraulic head loss assumptions (HGL analysis);
(f) capacity of culverts considering inlet/outlet control
(g) contraction and expansion losses;
(h) eddy–viscosity values
(i) routing parameters.

1.5 Design plans, drawings and figures

1.5.1 General

This section provides guidance in the preparation of engineering, architectural and landscape drawings and plans as part of any submission to support a development application, including operational work.

1.5.2 Standards

Drafting must be of a standard that is acceptable for construction in civil engineering and architectural practice, in accordance with the requirements of AS 1100.101-1992 Technical drawing - General principles.

1.5.3 Content of drawings

(1) All engineering drawings must be uniquely referenced and require the full signature of a Registered Professional Engineer Queensland, number, and date, in the title block.
(2) The leading drawing of the set of drawings must contain the following information:
(a) Council file reference number;
(b) site address (consistent with the application);
(c) locality plan, clearly showing the stage boundary and adjacent stages if applicable;
(d) drawing index, including drawings for other stages if applicable;
(e) list of all Council standard drawings used;
(f) list of all consultant's standard drawings used (copies to be attached);
(g) full legend;
(h) asset register.

1.5.4 Scales

(1) The chosen scale for a drawing must permit easy and clear interpretation of the information depicted.
(2) If full-size drawings are reduced, appropriate block/graduated or prefix scales must be provided to enable the interpretation of dimensions specified in the reduction copies.
(3) The preferred scales for use must conform to the recommendations of AS 1100.101-1992 Technical drawing - General principles.
(4) The recommended scales are 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and multiplying the aforementioned scales by integral powers of 10.
(5) Multiples and submultiples of 10 for scales 1:25 and 1:125 are not preferred.
(6) Unless specified elsewhere in this planning scheme policy, the following scales are suggested for particular uses but these may be varied as appropriate to the works concerned:
(a) Plans – 1:1000 or 1:500 (roof-water reticulation layout plans should be drawn in the 1:500 scale);
(b) longitudinal sections –
(i) horizontal 1:1000 and vertical 1:100; or
(ii) horizontal 1:500 and vertical 1:50.
(c) intersection details – 1:200, 1:100 or 1:250;
(d) cross-sections – 1:100;
(e) engineering details – 1:20 or 1:10.
(7) A north point and legend is to be shown on all drawings.

1.5.5 Survey datum

(1) Level information must be referenced to the Australian Height Datum.
(2) Position coordinates must be tied to the GDA94 datum based on the Mapping Grid of Australia coordinate system.
(3) Generally, only certified survey information from a registered surveyor is accepted.

1.5.6 Dimensions

(1) All dimensions are to be expressed in metric units.
(2) Linear dimensions on all roadworks drawings must be in metres (m), with the exception of some detailed drawings of small structures (such as maintenance holes, access chambers) and some standard drawings (such as kerb and channel), which may be in millimetres (mm).
(3) Reduced levels of benchmarks and reference pegs including permanent survey marks must be expressed to 3 decimal places (such as 0.001m).
(4) Reduced levels of roadworks and stormwater drainage must be expressed rounded to 3 decimal places (such as 0.001m).
(5) Chainages on drawings must be expressed to 3 decimal places (such as 0.001m).
(6) Road cross-sections must be provided at 20m intervals, with further subdivision of 10m to 5m intervals where necessary at horizontal or vertical curvatures.
(7) Road and pipe grades must be shown to 3 significant figures (such as 2.365%).

1.6 Detailed landscape plans

1.6.1 General

(1) Detailed landscape plans must be prepared by a suitably qualified and experienced landscape architect or designer.
(2) The purpose of these plans is to detail streetscape works or parks embellishments.

1.6.2 Street planting

Detailed landscape plans for landscaping of the verge must show the following information at a minimum:

(a) road layout with property boundaries and lot numbers;
(b) road names;
(c) the extent of proposed streetscape works;
(d) proposed paving material, patterns and colours;
(e) proposed position and number of street furniture and pedestrian lights;
(f) all finished surface levels;
(g) all proposed and existing services in the footpath;
(h) proposed artwork, balustrades, and any other structures;
(i) proposed garden bed and street tree planting schedule of species and layout;
(j) a full specification and details of the proposed treatment;
(k) if required, a full specification of the footpath construction, landscaping and tree planting within a road reserve including roundabouts, speed control devices, and traffic islands;
(l) existing trees (including diameter at breast height – DBH, canopy spread and species name) on site that will be retained;
(m) the exact location of water meters and taps, if required;
(n) the position of a temporary irrigation system for the duration of the maintenance period;
(o) general detail of planting holes including mulch type and depth, location of weed mat, depth and type of soil mix, root barrier, detail of drainage layers;
(p) the area (m2) of landscaping must be shown on the asset register;
(q) any landscaping associated with structural features such as acoustic fencing, entrance features and street furniture.

1.6.3 Park embellishment

(1) Detailed landscape plans pertaining to park embellishment are required to show existing and proposed details including but not limited to:
(a) plans and sections;
(b) contours and levels;
(c) existing vegetation and vegetation protection and management provisions
(d) existing natural features to be retained and protected (such as wetlands, waterways and rock formations);
(e) details of proposed hard and soft landscape construction works (such as details of a planting plan, plant species schedule, surface treatments and structures);
(f) details of manufacturer and type of park equipment (such as play equipment and furniture) to be used;
(g) the location of any stormwater quality management infrastructure to be constructed in the park including maintenance access to the infrastructure.
(2) Details of other works proposed in the park, which do not form part of the detailed landscape plan, must be referred to on the plan (such as vegetation management, rehabilitation and environmental management plans).
(3) The design and management of the park must be incorporated into the erosion and sediment control plan (where relevant to conditions of a development approval).

1.7 Arborist reports and vegetation plans

1.7.1 General

(1) All arborist reports and vegetation plans must be prepared by a suitably qualified and experienced person with minimum AQF Level 5/Diploma in Arboriculture and at least 5 years post graduate experience in arboriculture principles and practices including tree hazard assessment and reporting.
(2) The person commissioned to carry out the report must also have adequate professional indemnity insurance (to $10,000,000) and provide a current certificate to that effect.

Note—Consideration may need to be given to vegetation protected by other mechanisms such as local laws.

1.7.2 Arborist report

The following information is required in an arborist report:
(a) name, address telephone number, a qualification and experience of the arborist carrying out the inspection and reporting;
(b) address of the site containing the trees in question;
(c) who the report was prepared for, and the report brief;
(d) the date of the inspection;
(e) abstract or summary of the report;
(f) methods and techniques used in the inspection;
(g) plans to scale that accurately show:
(i) property boundaries (preferably based on cadastral boundaries);
(ii) north point and major landmarks for orientation;
(iii) location of the trees on the subject site and any adjoining trees which may be affected by the proposed activities, referenced by number in the written report;
(h) development application plans to show the proposed development including services, driveways, and any alteration to existing site levels and drainage;
(i) plans to show tree protection zones and correspond to a description of tree protection in the report;
(j) the scientific and common name, age class, height, crown spread (from north to south if possible), DBH, health and condition of each tree;
(k) tree protection measures as required, including a post-construction tree maintenance program;
(l) discussion and hazard analysis of the data collected – this may include detailed information regarding wounds, cavities, cracks, splits, forking, root zone, pests and diseases;
(m) conclusion;
(n) recommendations, including discussion of all options and the rationale for selection of a preferred option;
(o) supporting evidence such as photographs, test results and statements where appropriate;
(p) sources of information referred to in the report;
(q) any caveats and limitations of service.

1.7.3 Vegetation survey

(1) A vegetation survey is to comprise the following:
(a) a scaled plan (A3 size and minimum scale of 1:500 preferred);
(b) a referenced table providing information on the vegetation;
(c) an on-site vegetation referencing system.
(2) A vegetation survey documents the following:
(a) all individual trees greater than 150mm DBH that are located on the development site, including an accurate and scaled representation of the canopy spread of a tree;
(b) if there are large areas of vegetation, specify the extent and structure of each vegetation community, including areas of vegetation communities that do not reach the 150mm threshold (e.g. regrowth communities or wetlands);
(c) all vegetation, including shrubbery, which enhances the landscape character of the site outside of the proposed development footprint;
(d) all vegetation growing on adjacent properties, including the road reserve, that impacts on or is directly impacted on by works on the site;
(e) the vegetation to be retained, pruned or removed.
(3) The vegetation table must reference the following:
(a) botanical and common names;
(b) height, spread of canopy, and DBH;
(c) condition;
(d) habitat features.

1.7.4 Vegetation retention plan

(1) A vegetation retention plan includes vegetation identified in the vegetation survey overlayed with the proposed development layout (including earthworks, services and other infrastructure) on a scaled plan.
(2) A vegetation retention plan identifies how vegetation is to be removed and retained and demonstrates how the design will minimise vegetation loss and mitigate construction impacts thereby maximising vegetation retention.
(3) A vegetation retention plan is a minimum A3 size, shows detail at a scale of 1:500 or better, includes inset diagrams where necessary, and has an easily distinguishable legend.
(4) A vegetation retention plan shows:
(a) an indicative cut-and-fill plan to demonstrate that any trees nominated for retention can be retained;
(b) locations and depths for all existing and proposed services, including sewer, water, stormwater treatment devices, electricity and communication;
(c) detailed design of all civil works;
(d) maximum vegetation retention.
(5) The vegetation survey and vegetation retention plan can be combined on a single document if legibility is not affected.

1.7.5 Vegetation management plan

An arboriculture impact report and vegetation management plan that documents the impacts of development on vegetation to be retained is prepared by a suitably qualified arborist in accordance with AS 4970-2009 Protection of trees on development sites.

1.7.6 Vegetation rehabilitation plan

This section is left intentionally blank.

1.8 Earthworks drawings

Earthworks drawings show the following information:
(a) contaminated soil areas;
(b) existing surface contours and levels;
(c) finished surface contours and levels;
(d) areas of cut;
(e) areas of fill including any requirement for imported fill;
(f) slopes of cut batters and fill embankments;
(g) location and height of any earth-retaining structures, such as boulder walls, concrete retaining walls and crib walls;
(h) access to properties where crossfall of lots is severe;
(i) if lots are to be filled to provide flood immunity, details of minimum habitable floor levels;
(j) locations of soil stockpiles;
(k) methods for dust control;
(l) areas subject to a vegetation protection order under a local law;
(m) if cut-and-fill operations are near a boundary with an adjoining private property or a public space, cross-sections showing the finished levels and positions in relation to the property boundaries including the surface levels and any structures in the adjoining land;
(n) details of a proposed ground anchoring system;
(o) erosion and sediment and control measures required until earthworks are rehabilitated.

1.9 Roads drawings and reports

1.9.1 Layout

Road layout drawings show the following information:
(a) legend;
(b) road reserve boundaries including any widening, and road identification;
(c) lot boundaries with proposed lot number;
(d) road centre-line, chainages, and bearings including chainages and centre-line of intersecting streets;
(e) dimensioned road reserve, verge, carriageway and footpath widths;
(f) location of existing services;
(g) proposed contours;
(h) proposed easements;
(i) stage boundaries;
(j) horizontal curve data;
(k) traffic islands;
(l) concrete footpaths;
(m) on-road bicycle lanes and off-road bicycle paths;
(n) cut-off drains;
(o) water quality treatment devices
(p) street trees and gardens
(q) vehicular crossings;
(r) areas of paver/stencil concrete treatment;
(s) side drains;
(t) location of guardrails and fences;
(u) pavement tapers.

1.9.2 Longitudinal sections

Road longitudinal section drawings show the following information:
(a) chainages;
(b) existing surface levels;
(c) design road centre-line;
(d) design kerb lip levels;
(e) cut and fill depths and volumes;
(f) grades;
(g) chainages and levels of grade intersection points;
(h) chainages and levels of tangent points of vertical curves;
(i) chainages and levels of crest and sag points;
(j) lengths and radii of vertical curves;
(k) super-elevated curves;
(l) minimum pavement thicknesses including base, sub-base and asphalt thicknesses and types;
(m) scales;
(n) road names;
(o) datum.

1.9.3 Cross-sections

Drawings for typical road cross-sections show the following information:
(a) road reserve width;
(b) carriageway widths;
(c) verge widths;
(d) crossfall of pavement and verge;
(e) pavement under kerb and channel, shoulder and traffic islands;
(f) existing services and proposed services;
(g) type of kerb and channel;
(h) subsoil drainage;
(i) road names;
(j) chainages;
(k) datum;
(l) natural surface and finished levels;
(m) position and size of a concrete footpath or bicycle path;
(n) traffic islands.

1.9.4 Intersections and road widening

(1) Drawings show the following information for an intersection or road widening:
(a) road names;
(b) stormwater drainage;
(c) lip levels;
(d) curve radius;
(e) adjacent lot numbers, point chainage and offset;
(f) tangent;
(g) road reserve;
(h) pavement contours at sufficient intervals;
(i) channelisation works;
(j) surface treatments;
(k) concrete footpath or bikeway crossings;
(l) water quality treatment devices;
(m) street trees and gardens.
(2) Drawings show the following information for a speed control device:
(a) the information for an intersection or road widening;
(b) island geometry and levels;
(c) product code of devices;
(d) radii, chainage and offsets;
(e) island kerb;
(f) landscape area.
(3) Drawings show the following information for pavers:
(a) restraints;
(b) pavements;
(c) drainage;
(d) type of paver (e.g. colour, size, material, product code, manufacturer).

1.9.5 Public utility plant

Drawings show the following information for public utility plant:

(a) utilities;
(b) long section;
(c) cross section;
(d) connections to residential properties.

1.9.6 Pavement design report

(1) A pavement design report presents all analyses, data, policies, calculations and other considerations used to design the structural aspects of a pavement.
(2) The freight and heavy vehicle traffic generated by the development is to be identified in a traffic impact assessment report and shall form an input into the pavement design report.
(3) A pavement design report must be prepared by or under the supervision of and signed by a suitably qualified Registered Professional Engineer Queensland.
(4) A pavement design report includes the design input values and output including but not limited to:
(a) determination of design traffic – all assumptions used to determine design traffic and any adjustments to the traffic data;
(b) traffic data including details of traffic count volumes and composition;
(c) traffic modelling including heavy vehicles generated by the development;
(d) design period;
(e) subgrade properties;
(f) summary of laboratory tests conducted on any materials extracted from the existing pavement or future subgrade;
(g) subgrade soil conditions and subgrade Californian Bearing Ratio;
(h) results of any Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) testing to characterise the existing structural condition (including the MODULUS back-calculation summary);
(i) drainage considerations and any proposed subsoil drainage systems are to be shown on typical sections;
(j) summary of assumptions used to develop pavement design;
(k) any mechanistic design including material properties and CIRCLY (software) calculations;
(l) proposed pavement design showing pavement materials and layer thickness;
(m) any other matter that may adversely affect the design and life of the pavement;
(5) A pavement design report concludes with a recommended pavement design based on the data, analyses, and procedures included in the report.
(6) The calculation of design traffic is to be included with the design submission.
(7) In deep cuttings, fills or other instances where testing of subgrade is not possible until completion of bulk earthworks, pavement design or re-evaluation of a design will be required upon examination and testing at subgrade level.
(8) If the pavement design is varied following re-evaluation of the subgrade properties, a final pavement design report is to be submitted prior to subgrade inspection.
(9) The drawings in the pavement design report must clearly indicate the structure, material types and layer thicknesses of the proposed pavement and surfacing.
(10) Records of actual pavement construction, together with any subgrade replacement or modification, must be collated as a final report to accompany the 'as constructed' drawings.

1.9.7 Functional traffic layout

(1) Functional layout plans are submitted to Council, with the approved subdivision layout plans (1 set), for approval prior to approval of detailed engineering designs.
(2) Functional layout plans are approved in advance of detailed design to avoid reworking of designs.
(3) Approved functional layout plans shall incorporate traffic signs, pavement markings, water quality devices and landscaping do not obviate the requirement of an approval of traffic signs and pavement marking, water quality devices and landscaping drawings.
(4) Functional layouts show or are accompanied by the following information:
(a) background information that includes:
(i) design philosophy or concept description;
(ii) design speed for each road type;
(iii) reasons for the access arrangement;
(b) a plan, drawn to scale, showing all relevant existing details, that includes:
(i) land use of adjacent sites and sites opposite the development;
(ii) existing intersections and vehicular entrances in the vicinity;
(iii) existing road layout;
(iv) existing services which have an impact on the layout;
(v) existing pavement marking;
(vi) existing trees;
(c) proposed roadworks and channelisation layout, drawn to scale, that includes:
(i) critical dimensions such as kerb alignments, radii and kerb and channel types;
(ii) proposed pavement marking, including lane marking with lane widths;
(iii) relationship of work with other stages;
(iv) limit of Council responsibility where other authorities are involved (such as Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads);
(v) all lot and property boundaries;
(vi) proposed trees, gardens and water quality devices;
(vii) any other information considered necessary by Council to adequately assess the performance of the facility.
(5) A 1:250 scale is recommended for intersection drawings, and 1:500 scale is recommended for more extensive roadworks.
(6) A North Point is provided on all drawings.
(7) If the development is at or near an intersection, a plan of the entire intersection showing all existing legs is required.

1.9.8 Traffic signs and pavement marking

(1) Traffic sign and pavement marking plans are submitted to Council (2 sets in hard copy), with the approved road layout plans (1 set) and the approved street naming and numbering plans (1 set) for approval.
(2) A scale of 1:250 or 1:500 is recommended.
(3) Plans are drawn using Council’s standard templates including title blocks and symbols, and include the consultant’s logo (the applicant can elect to use Council or an external engineering consultant), and Council’s designated traffic area identification number.
(4) Plans show existing and proposed details, including but not limited to:
(a) real property boundaries and kerb lines;
(b) driveways;
(c) existing and proposed pavement markings;
(d) signs such as parking signs and street name signs;
(e) power poles and service pits;
(f) traffic signals;
(g) the preferred future road layout where the proposed streets may be in the future a loop road or cul-de-sac;
(i) stormwater quality treatment devices;
(ii) street trees and gardens.
(h) locality plan (for jobs proposing new roads).
(5) All existing markings that will be retained must be fully dimensioned, as well as proposed markings.
(6) A thin dashed line is used for existing markings that will be removed.
(7) Traffic signs are shown using the standard sign code (such as ERECT R2-14(L)) and not shown as pictorial signs.

1.10 Stormwater drainage drawings

1.10.1 Layout

Stormwater drainage layout plans show the following information:
(a) road reserve boundaries and road identification;
(b) allotment boundaries with proposed lot number;
(c) location of stormwater features such as stormwater and roof-water lines (including size), maintenance holes, gullies, outlets, inlets and roof-water inspection pits, water quality management devices, water quantity devices;
(d) location of existing services;
(e) existing and proposed contours;
(f) proposed easements;
(g) stage boundaries;
(h) concrete footpaths;
(i) concrete bikeways;
(j) cut-off drains;
(k) vehicular crossings;
(l) maintenance access paths;
(m) side drains;
(n) location of waterway corridors;
(o) position of a waterway (e.g. centre-line and top of bank);
(p) extents of an overland flow path including cross-sectional details;
(q) roof-water kerb adaptors in the kerb and channel;

1.10.2 Longitudinal section

Stormwater drainage longitudinal section drawings show the following information:
(a) chainages;
(b) existing surface levels;
(c) design finished surface levels;
(d) pipe invert levels;
(e) maintenance hole chainages;
(f) distance between maintenance holes;
(g) grade of pipes;
(h) flow velocity and/or partial flow velocity;
(i) pipe capacity;
(j) pipe size;
(k) diameter of pipes;
(l) pipe class (e.g. Class 2) and pipe material/type (i.e. RCP, SRP, FRC, HDPE, PE);
(m) pipe installation type of support (i.e. bedding method) – (refer BSD-8003);
(n) method of trench compaction;
(o) hydraulic grade line including the corresponding water levels at junctions;
(p) design storm frequency;
(q) maintenance hole diameter;
(r) invert levels of inlets or outlets, extending to the free outlet or creek bed;
(s) gully numbers;
(t) depth to invert at maintenance holes;
(u) type of gully and size of lintel;
(v) service crossing.

1.10.3 Details

(1) Drawings show the following information for a maintenance hole:
(a) connecting pipes;
(b) maintenance hole/chamber size;
(c) identification number;
(d) location chainage;
(e) invert levels for each pipe;
(f) benching details.
(2) Drawings show the following information for an inlet or outlet:
(a) identification number;
(b) thickness of walls and floor;
(c) reinforcing;
(d) type of treatment to prevent scour (such as energy dissipator);
(e) water quality management devices (such as a gross pollutant trap or a sedimentation basin);
(f) type of grate – galvanised;
(g) surrounding levels (such as waterway bed and banks);
(h) position in relation to site and stormwater drainage features (such as waterway, property boundary, flow direction or flow velocity);
(i) invert levels;
(j) surcharge structures.
(3) Drawings show the following information for a catchment:
(a) tabulation of catchment information (such as catchment areas, slopes, run-off coefficient or design discharges);
(b) sub-catchment boundaries;
(c) full external catchment with contours extending beyond the limits of the site;
(d) existing and proposed contours.
(4) Drawings include a stormwater drainage calculation sheet for stormwater drainage.
(5) Drawings show the following information for an open channel:
(a) top and toe of batters;
(b) cross-sections;
(c) design levels;
(d) existing surface levels, either by contours or spot levels, on the subject site and on the adjoining properties or road reserves;
(e) proposed spot levels and contours;
(f) proposed development and habitable floor levels;
(g) maintenance and/or safety berms;
(h) longitudinal section;
(i) landscaping details.
(6) Drawings show the following information for a detention or retention facility:
(a) location and extent of each storage area;
(b) locations and details of each outlet and/or discharge control device;
(c) locations and details of any inlets;
(d) catchment area draining to each storage area;
(e) maximum water surface levels in each storage area and corresponding AEP%;
(f) overflow structures and surcharge paths;
(g) levels and location of the discharge points for each storage area;
(h) internal drainage system;
(i) existing contours and final design levels;
(j) final site layout;
(k) location and extent of any floodway or flow paths;
(l) cross-sections through the storages;
(m) plans and long sections of maintenance access driveways
(n) the information shown for an open channel;
(o) side batters;
(p) spillway detailed plan and sections;
(q) low flow pipes;
(r) scour protection at inlets and outlets;
(s) floor subsoil drainage;
(t) details of embankments including cross sections;
(u) flood bypass facility.
(7) Drawings show the following information for a culvert:
(a) full structural details including base slab design and support;
(b) handrails;
(c) scour protection.
(d) culvert size, types and invert levels;
(e) sealing of joints.
(8) Drawings show the following information for an overland flow path:
(a) existing surface levels, either by contours or spot levels, on the subject site and on the adjoining properties or road reserves or waterways;
(b) finished surface levels on the subject sites;
(c) proposed habitable floor and development levels;
(d) overland flow path widths and levels, and cross-sections along the flow path for the design flows;
(e) existing drainage structures, pipe sizes and levels, including at the proposed discharge point;
(f) plan extent of overland flow.
(9) Drawings show the following information for a water quality devices:
(a) ancillary pipes, culverts, drains, retaining walls, pits, grates, basins, and surfaces designed to temporarily or permanently retain stormwater for water quality treatment.
(b) design contours and set-out;
(c) catchment area drainage to the device;
(d) location and detail of each inlet and outlet;
(e) detail of low flow diversion systems;
(f) normal operating level of device or 1% AEP water levels;
(g) levels of details of overflow structures and surcharge paths;
(h) levels and location of outlet points for each storage area;
(i) cross-sections through the device;
(j) vegetation types and planting density;
(k) underdrain details;
(l) gross pollutant and sediment forebay;
(m) maintenance access;
(n) maintenance plan;
(o) area of treatment, landscaping, screening;
(p) fencing and gates
(q) specification of filter media (bioretention systems only);
(r) plan, levels and specifications of subsoil drainage system (bioretention system only);
(s) plans and long sections of maintenance access driveways.

1.11 Standard and non-standard infrastructure

(1) Generally, standard infrastructure as indicated in this planning scheme policy should be the type and nature of infrastructure provided.
(2) Non-standard infrastructure will only be considered where:
(a) there is a clear demonstration that:
(i) standard infrastructure is not able to meet the need of the particular circumstance;
(ii) non-standard infrastructure provides the same or better performance than standard infrastructure in terms of design, establishment, construction and maintenance; or
(b) Council has identified a preference for non-standard infrastructure in that particular circumstance.
(3) Where non-standard infrastructure is provided on the basis of Council accepting either of the above circumstances in (2), the non-standard infrastructure must be designed, assessed, delivered, established, constructed and maintained according to the following:
(a) Council's satisfaction at all stages until the infrastructure is no longer the responsibility of another party;
(b) complete information about the design, assessment, establishment, construction and maintenance is provided to Council;
(c) the design, establishment, construction and maintenance costs are completely accounted for and provided to Council;
(d) full life-cycle costs of the non-standard infrastructure are provided to Council.
^ Back to Top