watermark

Chapter 12 Public riverside facilities

Contents

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Concept planning

12.3 Material selection

12.4 Pedestrian and bicycle pathways

12.5 Structures over the Brisbane River

12.6 River edge retention

12.7 Balustrading and handrails

12.8 Furniture

12.9 Lighting

12.10 Planting and riparian vegetation

12.11 Shade and shelter

12.12 Signage

12.13 Public art

12.14 Ownership

12.1 Introduction

(1) This chapter outlines the following for public facilities along the Brisbane River intended to be owned or maintained by Brisbane City Council:
design and construction standards;
advice about satisfying assessment benchmarks in the planning scheme;
the information that the Council may request to be supplied for a development application.
(2) Public riverside facilities are those that are or will be publicly accessible and are located on parcels of land adjoining the Brisbane River.
(3) Examples of public riverside facilities include:
(a) pedestrian and bicycle pathways running along or to the river both on land and over water;
viewing points;
furniture;
pontoons;
river edge treatments.
(4) This chapter covers design requirements for:
(a) concept planning;
material selection;
pedestrian and bicycle access;
structures over water;
river edge retention;
balustrading and handrails;
furniture;
lighting;
planting and riparian vegetation;
shade and shelter;
signage;
public art.
(5) Land along the Brisbane River below the high water mark (HWM) is under the control of the Queensland Government.
(6) Development of facilities in land along the Brisbane River below HWM is guided by various State legislation and is subject to approval from a number of State agencies and authorities, including (but not limited to) the following works:
(a) works below HWM;
works affecting marine plants;
reclamation works.
(7) Land below the HWM is land lying below the level of mean high water spring tide (MHWS).
(8) Information on the MHWS or HWM is available on the Maritime Safety Queensland website.

12.2 Concept planning

(1) A concept plan is developed as part of a development application involving public riverside facilities.
(2) Chapter 1 of this planning scheme policy and the following are to be considered when developing the concept plan:
(a) existing character;
the development of public riverside facilities respects the existing character of the river and its surrounding context;
the 5 Brisbane River corridor sections identified in the Waterway corridors overlay code are based on different landscape character types and include:
(i) Brisbane River corridor – section 1;
(ii) Brisbane River corridor – section 2;
(iii) Brisbane River corridor – section 3;
(iv) Brisbane River corridor – section 4;
(v) Brisbane River corridor – section 5.
(3) For location of riverside access:
(a) pedestrian and bicycle paths are located on land;
(b) over-water pedestrian and cycle paths may be accepted by Council where required to connect new on-land facilities to existing adjoining over-water facilities (Chapter 8 of this planning scheme policy contains detailed design requirements);
(c) public pontoons or viewing points over-water may be acceptable (Chapter 8 of this planning scheme policy contains further guidance);
(d) within the city focus and inner eastern residential precincts, the surface level of structures and the top of river walls is a minimum of RL 2.100 AHD, except where necessary to connect to adjacent sites.
(4) The setback distance of a path or other facility from the river edge is determined by a number of factors such as safety, the need to protect or enhance riparian vegetation and the state of the riverbank.
(5) The potential for overlooking into private spaces is minimised through the height and detailing of riverside facilities.
(6) Connections are:
(a) provided between new public riverside facilities and existing adjoining public riverside facilities;
(b) constructed to the same standard as the public riverside facilities.
(7) If riverside sites abut existing Council parkland, the design of any new facilities must consider the existing character and any future plans for the park.
(8) Geotechnical considerations and investigations are undertaken as part of the development of riverside facilities to ensure that facilities are appropriate for the geology of the riverbank.
(9) Flooding considerations include the following:
(a) the Brisbane River is characterised by a tidal range of around 3m with quite strong tidal velocities and is occasionally subject to large-scale floods;
(b) flooding has the potential to cause bank failures and damage or wash away structures within the river and on the riverbank;
(c) the design of facilities within the river corridor could potentially contribute to flood impact, including flooding caused by the restriction of flow where this is exacerbated by retained debris load;
(d) structures may alter flow regimes and cause erosion, especially in flood events.
(10) Public riverside facilities are designed to withstand flooding, boat wash and changes to the deposition and erosion characteristics of the river and to avoid causing erosion.
(11) The minimum design life for public riverside facilities is:
(a) 100 years for all structures constructed below HWM or over the Brisbane River (i.e. revetment walls, jetties etc.);
(b) 50 years for existing structures constructed below HWM or over the Brisbane River (excluding revetment walls);
(c) 20 years for all other facilities, except shrub planting.

12.3 Material selection

(1) Materials specified for use in public riverside facilities in Table 12.3.A have been selected for their durability.
(2) Public riverside facilities are able to withstand the harsh climate and conditions of the riverside environment.
(3) In particular, facilities need to withstand the corrosive nature of the river, the continuous wetting and occasional flooding of structures, the continued wave action along the riverbank, prevailing winds and the potential for surfaces to become slippery.
(4) Materials are easy to clean and maintain by using graffiti-resistant materials, anti-graffiti coatings, dark colours, patterns, textures, self-clinging vines or planting near walls to restrict access.
(5) Equipment and fixtures that are vandal resistant are used.
(6) Materials ensure that the minimum design life can be achieved without major maintenance or replacement of elements.
(7) The materials and layout details for Riverwalk are shown in:
(a) Table 12.3.A for standard Typology 1 and Typology 2 Riverwalk sections as shown on the Bicycle network overlay map;
Table 12.3.B and Table 12.3.A for sections of Riverwalk located in the Newstead/Teneriffe neighbourhood plan area.
Table 12.3.A—Materials for use in public riverside facilities
Elements
Materials
Typology 1 – City reaches north and south
Typology 2 – Urban reaches
Path width
10m
6m
Unobstructed pavement width
6m
Materials
Honed coloured concrete with saw-cut pattern
Hanson (code 10050284), Boral or approved equivalent
CCS Ebony
90% ‘Blue Heeler’
10% ‘Winter Brown’
Broom finished:
Standard Portland
Grey concrete
Tactile paving
Concrete tactile paver by Chelmstone, Urbanstone or approved equivalent
Colour: Ghost Gum
Concrete tactile paver by Chelmstone, Urbanstone or approved equivalent
Colour: Black
Trees
Mix of tree species laid out in an informal manner with clusters of trees.
All trees minimum of 600mm from edges of pavement.
Medium- and small-crown trees to be planted at 2m – 6m centres.
Large-crown feature trees to be planted at minimum 10m centres.
Trees planted in
Tree grates
Turf pathway with concrete edge
Furniture
All furniture to be located outside of the unobstructed pavement area
Balustrade
To be used where required along river edge of pathway
Public art
Requirement and location to be determined on a site-by-site basis
Table 12.3.B—Newstead and Teneriffe waterfront neighbourhood plan area Riverwalk and landscape seating nodes treatment and layout
 
Newstead and Teneriffe waterfront neighbourhood plan area (1)
Elements
Riverwalk
Landscape seating nodes
Total public footway width
Minimum 6m
To be decided on a site-by-site basis
Unobstructed pavement width
Minimum 4.5m
To be decided on a site-by-site basis
Paving materials
In-situ coloured concrete:
CCS Oxide: Cashmere, shot-blast finish by Hanson, Boral or approved equivalent
Kerb and channel
Pre-cast Portland Grey concrete kerb units
Driveways
To match footway
Tactile Paving
Type: Concrete tactile paver
Supplier: Chelmstone, Urbanstone or approved equivalent
Colour: CCS 'Voodoo'
Street trees layout
Mix of species, laid out in an informal manner with clusters of trees, closely spaced in some locations and with a second row where footway width permits
Trees planted in
Garden beds
Street furniture
Seats: HUB – Newstead S3 Seat with armrests
Bins: BCC 240L dual bin
Bollards: HUB – Newstead Bollards 900 & Newstead Bollards 1800
Drinking fountain: Commercial systems - DF 5001 (with custom square bowl)
Pedestrian lighting: Bega pole top luminaire
Balustrade: to be determined on a site-by-site basis

Note—(1) To be read in conjunction with the Newstead and Teneriffe waterfront neighbourhood plan code.

12.4 Pedestrian and bicycle pathways

12.4.1 General

(1) For pathways within the Riverwalk extent, pathway layout is as per the relevant typology identified in the Bicycle network overlay code.
(2) The following requirements relate to both the upgrading of existing paths and the design and construction of new paths.
(3) For additional information on pathways refer to Chapter 3 of this planning scheme policy which provides additional information on pathways.

12.4.2 Design specifications and guidelines

(1) The design of pedestrian and cyclist facilities conforms with the latest edition of the following unless otherwise stated:
(a) Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1992;
(b) Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC) Advisory notes on access to premises issued under section 67(1)(k) of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992;
(c) AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities;
(d) AS 1428.1-2009 Design for access and mobility - General requirements for access – New building work;
(e) AS/NZS 1428.4.1:2009 Design for access and mobility - Means to assist the orientation of people with vision impairment - Tactile ground surface indicators;
(f) AS 1742.9-1986 Manual of uniform traffic control devices - Bicycle facilities;
(g) AS 1742.10-2009 Manual of uniform traffic control devices - Pedestrian control and protection;
(h) AS/NZS 1158.3.1:2005 Lighting for roads and public spaces - Pedestrian area (Category P) lighting - Performance and design requirements;
(i) Guide to Engineering Practice, ‘Intersections at Grade’, Part 5, Austroads;
(j) Guide to Engineering Practice, ‘Pedestrians’, Part 13, Austroads;
(k) Guide to Engineering Practice, ‘Bicycles’, Part 14, Austroads;
(l) Guide to Road Design, Pedestrian and Cyclist Paths, Part 6A: Austroads;
(m) Section D of Building Code of Australia;
(n) AS/NZS 4586:2004 Slip resistance classification of new pedestrian surface materials;
(o) Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (Draft) and Part 2 Draft Guidelines, Australian Transport Council;
(p) Australian Road Rules, 1999.
(2) If conflicts between the standards and guidelines arise, riverside facilities comply with the Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission (HREOC) Advisory notes on access to premises on the Australian Human Rights Commission website.
(3) The technical drawings and specifications for elements and materials are covered by Council’s standard drawings and reference specifications.
(4) Table 12.4.2.A contains a list of useful BSD drawings.
Table 12.4.2.A—BSD drawings
Kerb ramps
Concrete footpath
Concrete footpath full width
Bicycle pathways
Tree planting
Tree root protection
Footpaths and surfacing
Street furniture
Pedestrian safety lighting

12.4.3 Detailed design standards

12.4.3.1 Paths

(1) Riverside pedestrian and cycle paths are located on land.
(2) Over-water pedestrian and cycle paths are provided in exceptional circumstances.
(3) Paths are a minimum of RL 2.100 AHD and at a level to connect to adjoining paths.
(4) All riverside paths and parks are supported by a revetment wall that achieves the minimum design life specified for the structure type in Chapter 8 of this planning scheme policy.
(5) Design of pathways accommodates different users’ needs, varying behaviour and attention characteristics.
(6) Public riverside pathways and associated elements (including landings, ramps, handrails, grab rails, signage, lighting and furniture) are designed to achieve equitable access for people with disabilities in accordance with Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission (HREOC) Advisory notes on access to premises and AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities.

The decision whether to use a shared or separated path will be determined by a number of factors including:

(a) the precinct in which it is located;
(b) the purpose of the path (whether it is for commuting, recreation or both);
(c) the intensity of use;
(d) the overall width of the site;
(e) existing site features;
(f) adjacent paths;
(g) the desired ambience of the riverside site;
(h) the potential for conflict.
(7) The precincts noted above in sub-section (8) are designed for heavy use and have a minimum bicycle path of 3m and a pedestrian path of 2.5m with a minimum separation 0.5m, giving a total of 6m excluding lateral clearances.
(8) Other regular or frequent use separated paths have a minimum bicycle path of 2.5m and a pedestrian path of 2m with a separation of 0.5m, giving a total of 4.5m excluding lateral clearances.
(9) The width for separation will depend on the method used but must be a minimum of 0.5m.
(10) Where pedestrians and cyclists are separated, the pedestrian facility is situated closest to the river edge.
(11) Path type and methods of separation are agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis.
(12) Pathway design complies with Austroads, Guide to Road Design – Part 6A: Pedestrian and Cyclist Paths.
(13) Path widths vary according to whether it is shared or separated, its location within the river corridor, and its anticipated type and level of use.
(14) Shared paths are preferred in regular use areas where more recreational cyclists are expected.
(15) Shared paths are:
(a) provided where linear access is provided;
(b) used for commuting and recreation with heavy use paths a minimum width of 6m, excluding lateral clearances;
(c) used for commuting and recreation with frequent use paths a minimum width of 4.5m, excluding lateral clearances;
(d) used for recreation with regular use paths a minimum width of 3m, excluding lateral clearances.
(16) Minimum path widths are kept clear of obstacles including furniture, balustrading, handrails, trees, signage, light posts, vending machines and other structures.
(17) A 0.5m wide obstacle-free zone adjacent to the path, with the exception of cyclist holding rails that are located 0.3m from the edge of the path.
(18) Height clearance:
(a) is a minimum 2.4m clearance for the full width of the path;
(b) is a minimum 3.6m clearance for the full width of the path where access is required for emergency and maintenance vehicles.
(19) A continuous path of travel:
(a) is achieved for the path that follows the most commonly used and direct route, but clear signage of an alternative route is provided if this is not possible;
(b) does not include stairways.
(20) The use of gradients considers the following:
(a) ramps (as defined by AS 1428 (Set)-2010 Design for access and mobility) are not used in situations where the difference in height between levels connected exceeds 2m;
(b) where ramps are not appropriate, consideration is given to supplementary access with lifts, especially where ramps exceed 60m in length;
(c) walkways (as defined by AS 1428 (Set)-2010 Design for access and mobility) are not used where the difference in height between levels connected exceeds 5m;
(d) in all instances where different levels are connected, the gradient of the path of travel is minimised, and the preferred maximum gradient is 3% (1V:33H).
(21) Landings on ramps and walkways are 1.5m long with zero gradient in the direction of travel.

12.4.3.2 Resting places

Resting places:

(a) are located adjacent to the path of travel;
(b) are accessible from the path;
(c) include provisions for seating and for people in wheelchairs;
(d) are located at the following maximum intervals (interpolate the dimensions for intermediate gradients):
(i) gradient of path of travel 1 in 33 (1V:33H) maximum – 60m;
(ii) gradient of path of travel 1 in 20 (1V:22H) maximum – 37m;
(iii) gradient of path of travel 1 in 14 (1V:14H) maximum – 14m.

12.4.3.3 Access points

(1) Access points to riverside paths are required at regular intervals.
(2) Access points are designed to directly link the riverside path with the surrounding urban framework including streets, established points of entry to the river, nearby public transport terminuses, other paths, car parking, parks, destinations, personal safety and other points of interest.
(3) Access points to the location of points of entry take into account the practicality of building a compliant continuous path of travel from it.
(4) Access points are accessible and designed to meet the same standards as set out in this section.

12.4.3.4 Intersection of paths

Intersections:

(a) of paths maintain high visibility in all directions;
(b) establish primary and secondary movements that are reinforced with pavement treatments or signage;
(c) provide tactile or audible cues at access points and intersections in compliance with AS/NZS 1428.4.1:2009 Design for access and mobility – Means to assist the orientation of people with vision impairment – Tactile ground surface indicators;
(d) use tactile indicators that are 300mm x 300mm and 40mm thick cast concrete paving units, achieving a minimum R12 or Class ‘V’ slip resistance rating.

12.4.3.5 Crossing points

Crossing points:

(a) are not required on shared points, except at key points to link to destinations, features of interest or activity nodes;
(b) are required on separated paths across riverside paths at access points and to access associated riverside facilities;
(c) are a minimum width of 3m;
(d) are highlighted by a change in materials or treatment, together with signage as required by section 12.12;
(e) provide audible and tactile cues in compliance with AS/NZS 1428.4.1:2009 Design for access and mobility – Means to assist the orientation of people with vision impairment – Tactile ground surface indicators;
(f) use tactile indicators that are 300mm x 300mm and 40mm thick cast concrete paving units, achieving a minimum R12 or Class ‘V’ slip resistance rating;
(g) have consistent treatment to enhance useability.

12.4.3.6 Surface treatments

Surface treatments:

(a) for paths are durable, stable, firm, even, relatively smooth but slip resistant, safe and traversable by all users;
(b) are chosen depending on a number of different criteria, including:
(i) their location within the river corridor;
(ii) the grade of the surface and the coefficient of friction required;
(iii) whether the surface provides guidance;
(iv) the physical environment, climate and the potential demands which could be placed on the surface;
(c) for shared pathways is broom-finished concrete;
(d) for separated pathways is broom-finished concrete for pedestrian paths and broom-finished concrete with a green slip-resistant coating for bicycle paths;
(e) paving achieves a Class V classification in compliance with AS 4586:1999 Slip resistance classification of new pedestrian surface materials;
(f) use contrasting pavement surface colour in a consistent manner to delineate cyclist-only paths, different areas for pedestrians and cyclists on separated paths and at crossing points;
(g) are preferably green for bicycle-only paths, however this may be varied where another colour would suit the local character (e.g. terracotta coloured concrete to match the Kangaroo Point Cliff’s cyclist only path, or a terracotta in colour applied finish to match the over-water section of the Bicentennial bikeway near the Victoria bridge);
(h) are green for on-road bicycle lanes (to Council’s approval);
(i) use devices including tactile or other physical cues to provide direction and alert to the presence of hazards in accordance with AS 1428.4-1992 Design for access and mobility - Tactile ground surface indicators for the orientation of people with vision impairment;
(j) of path surfaces and sub-bases are designed, constructed and maintained in accordance with Guide to Engineering Practice, Part 13 – ‘Pedestrians’ and Part 14 – ‘Bicycles’ and comply with AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities, to ensure a satisfactory level of service for pedestrians and cyclists throughout its life;
(k) of paths can accommodate maintenance vehicles, such as small trucks and emergency vehicles;
(l) of service lid covers and drainage grates are avoided in paths.

12.4.3.7 Fences

Fences:

(a) are installed along a path where the path adjoins a steep drop or batter or an arterial road, a bridge or culvert exists on the path, or a hazard exists adjacent to the path (refer to section 12.7);
(b) have a minimum clearance of 0.5m from the path;
(c) where full barrier fences, have a 150mm pedal clearance as well as the 0.5m clearance from the path;
(d) have requirements as per Austroads, Guide to Road Design, Part 6A: pedestrian and cyclist paths.

12.4.3.8 Other requirements

(1) For lighting, refer to section 12.9.
(2) For signage, refer to section 12.12.
(3) For associated facilities and furniture, refer to section 12.8.

12.5 Structures over the Brisbane River

12.5.1 General

(1) Chapter 8 of this planning scheme policy contains details for structures built over the Brisbane River, such as boardwalks, pontoons, jetties and viewing platforms.
(2) Non-structural considerations include aesthetics and serviceability standards, such as surface finishes, initial expenditure and maintenance costs.
(3) Retention of the river edge for bank stabilisation, erosion control or access paths are required (refer to section 12.6 for guidance).

12.5.2 Detailed design standards

12.5.2.2 Pontoons and jetties

(1) Pontoons and jetties are for private use.
(2) Pontoons and jetties that are for private use are not supported by Council where attached to existing or future public riverside facilities, except in the following circumstances:
(a) if there is an existing strategy for public access to the river;
(b) if the development of the private landing contributes a separate public landing for motorised and non-motorised craft;
(c) if unrestricted public access to the public riverside facility is retained.
(3) The retention of existing pontoons attached to future public riverside facilities may be supported by Council, and agreement is made with Council.
(4) Existing river wall structures adjacent to proposed riverside facilities, such as wharves, jetties or loading docks, may have cultural or heritage significance.
(5) Where existing river wall structures are in reasonable condition and can add to the recreational, cultural or aesthetic appeal, effort should be made to incorporate them into the public riverside facility as long as they comply with the Queensland Heritage Act 1992 and the Heritage overlay code.
(6) Where the structures in sub-section (6) are retained and incorporated, they may need to be modified to meet current standards in regard to safety and accessibility.
(7) Where existing river structures are retained they are to be certified by a Registered Professional Engineer of Queensland.
(8) Existing structures are repaired in order to give a minimum 50 year design life, with the extent of repairs approved by Council.

12.5.2.3 Tenure

(1) Land below HWM is generally within the control of the Department of Natural Resources and Mines.
(2) The tenure arrangement for structures below HWM is agreed between the Department of Natural Resources and Mines, the developer of public riverside facilities and Council in the early stages of the project.
(3) Section 12.14 details the preferred tenure arrangement.

12.5.2.4 Approvals

(1) Structures below HWM must be approved in accordance with the Transport Infrastructure Act 1994.
(2) Disturbance of mangroves or other marine vegetation must have approval in accordance with the Fisheries Act 1994.
(3) Dredging must be approved in accordance with the Environmental Protection Act 1994.
(4) Other approvals may be required depending on the nature of the structure.

12.5.2.5 Siting

(1) Over-water pedestrian and cycle paths are generally not allowed, however they may be accepted by Council under special circumstances.
(2) Over-water paths, where approved for use, are a maximum of 2m set back from land, with the gap only widened as necessary if existing mangroves are to be accommodated.

12.5.2.6 Finished levels

(1) Structures have a finished level the same as any adjacent public riverside path or as required to match future paths.
(2) The underside of fixed structures is as follows:
(a) minimum 500mm from underside of superstructure to highest astronomical tide;
(b) minimum 300mm from underside of headstocks to highest astronomical tide;
(c) within the city focus and inner eastern residential precincts the minimum finished surface level of structures and riverside paths is to be RL 2.100 AHD;
(d) in other precincts the underside of fixed structures is a minimum of 0.5m above highest astronomical tide to the underside of headstocks.

12.5.2.7 Aesthetics

(1) A visual impact assessment is undertaken of the proposed structure as viewed from the river, the structure and land.
(2) The visual impact assessment considers the cumulative effect of the piles, sub-structure, deck and balustrading.
(3) Boardwalks, when viewed from the river, are visually cohesive and recessive through their detailing, materials and colour.
(4) Piles are dark in colour and set back a minimum of 1m from the edge of the structure to create a shadow line.
(5) The deck finish and the balustrading are visually cohesive to add to the user experience.
(6) Battens are not used.
(7) Where possible, existing marine or riparian vegetation or planting is used to provide a setting to structures.
(8) Section 12.7 provides guidance on balustrading.

12.5.2.8 Quay lines

(1) Structures are within the quay lines as set or agreed by the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
(2) Structures do not impose any constraints or cause a visual detriment to navigation.

12.6 River edge retention

12.6.1 General

River edge retention and erosion control are two components of the river edge that influence the character of the river corridor.

12.6.2 Design specifications and guidelines

The latest editions of the following documents should be consulted in design and maintenance:
(a) Transport Infrastructure Act 1994;
(b) Fisheries Act 1994;
(c) Environmental Protection Act 1994;
(d) Queensland Acid Sulfate Soils Investigation Team (QASSIT) guidelines for sampling and management of acid sulfate soils and potential acid sulfate soils.

12.6.3 Detailed design standards

12.6.3.1 General

(1) All riverside paths and parks are supported by a revetment wall that achieves a minimum design life of 100 years.
(2) Where existing river walls are to be used as the ultimate river edge protection to the site, they must be inspected and certified by a Registered Professional Engineer of Queensland.
(3) Existing river walls are repaired in order to give a minimum 100 year design life.
(4) The details and extent of repairs is approved by the principal asset officer structures in infrastructure management.
(5) Where existing stone pitched river walls require repair to provide the minimum design life, the surface of the wall is cleaned of algae, deleterious matter and loose material by high-pressure water jet.
(6) The existing river wall is made good wherever it has collapsed or deteriorated using either recovered stone (cleaned as above) or fresh quarry stone.
(7) The face stone of the river wall is to match that of the existing wall.
(8) The face of the repaired river wall must be completed true to line with the existing wall, and:
(a) the existing capping to the wall is replaced wherever it is cracked or broken;
(b) the entire wall is 'pointed up' with mortar to provide a sound surface.
(9) Holes are drilled immediately behind the wall to allow it to be grouted, whereby:
(a) grout is pumped through these holes to ensure all voids in and behind the wall are filled from the base of the wall to the top of the wall;
(b) once grouting is complete, the wall is water blasted again to remove all grout, cement and loose material from the face of the stone and the capping;
(c) weep holes are cored in the wall if required by the certifying engineer.
(10) Within the city focus and inner eastern residential precincts, the top of river walls is a minimum of RL 2.100 AHD, or to match adjacent walls.
(11) Litter trapped in rock spall is collected on a regular basis as part of the maintenance of the public riverside facilities.
(12) Where construction or maintenance operations involved the exposure of acid sulfate soils or potential acid sulfate soils, neutralisation is required.
(13) Further reference should be made to the Queensland Acid Sulfate Soils Investigation Team (QASSIT 1997) guidelines for sampling and management of acid sulfate soils and potential asset sulfate soils.

12.6.3.2 Retention and erosion control

(1) Erosion control and bank stabilisation techniques:
(a) only includes the retention of the river edge where it is necessary for bank stabilisation and erosion control;
(b) are aimed at retaining and enhancing the existing natural river edge;
(c) have a preferred approach which is through the use planting, and this could be a mix of hydro-mulch and direct planting in geotextile (or similar) with the use of coir logs;
(d) are agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis.
(2) Where more hard retention or erosion control techniques are required, the aim is to minimise their visibility in the river corridor through its detailing, materials and colour.
(3) The finish of walls is to be appropriate to their location within the river corridor and reflect their local context in terms of historical associations and the style of adjacent buildings.
(4) Hard erosion protection and bank stabilisation techniques commonly employed within the Brisbane River corridor include dumped rock (ungrouted), dumped rock (grouted), stone pitched walls and gabions.

Note—Treatments comprising dumped rock (ungrouted) and gabions are considered suitable for supporting mangrove colonies (either total retention or window coppicing) where required due to their silt-retaining properties.

(5) Boulder walls are not used due to the recurring problems with stability, safety, pest habitat and influence on erosion.
(6) Concrete revetment walls, skirts or battens are not acceptable river edge treatments.
(7) The visibility of the edge of concrete slabs from the river is to be minimised.
(8) Grouted porphyry stone revetment walls are an appropriate form of river edge retention where the edge is adjacent to historic sites or where porphyry is present.
(9) Grouted blue stone (or another stone of appropriate hardness) revetment walls are an appropriate form of river edge retention in most locations.
(10) The senior program officer – Riverwalk can provide standard details for the construction of new stone pitched walls.
(11) Where walls are used, the face gradient considers stability, safety and site conditions, with concrete mix a 3:1 ratio of sand to cement mortar mix.
(12) Dumped rock has a suitable grading to improve stability.

12.7 Balustrading and handrails

12.7.1 Design specifications and guidelines

(1) In order to minimise clutter along the river edge and to maximise views to the river, balustrading along the river edge is used where pedestrian or cyclist safety is at risk (e.g. where a path or facility is located adjacent to a slope or drop, to prevent pedestrians or cyclists from crossing at particular locations, or to channel users to particular facilities or destinations or to avoid hazards).
(2) Handrails are provided where necessary for support, balance and guidance for all pedestrians and also as a means of propulsion for wheelchair users.

12.7.2 Standards

The provision of balustrades and handrails conforms to the latest edition of the following:
(a) Guide to Engineering Practice, ‘Bicycles’, Part 14, Austroads;
(b) Guide to Engineering Practice, ‘Pedestrians’, Part 13, Austroads;
(c) Section D of the Building Code of Australia;
(d) AS 1428.1-2009 Design for access and mobility, General requirements for access - New building work;
(e) AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility, Enhanced and additional requirements – Buildings and facilities;
(f) Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission Advisory notes on Access to premises. Issued under section 67 (1)(k) of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992;
(g) Bridge Design Code, Austroads;
(h) ASTM A380.

12.7.3 Detailed design standards

12.7.3.1 Balustrading location

Location:
(a) requirement for balustrading at the river edge will depend on the proximity of the path to the river, difference in height between the finished surface level of the path and the lowest astronomical tide, whether a fence already exists along the river edge and whether a buffer of vegetation exists;
(b) as a general guide, a balustrade is required if there is no buffer of planting and the ratio of the height of the river bank to the distance of the path from the edge is less than 1:2 (1V:2H);
(c) details of tidal conditions for a particular location can be obtained from Queensland Transport;
(d) where land is available, the path is set back from the edge to avoid the need for balustrading;
(e) the need for balustrading is agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis.

12.7.3.2 Balustrading design

(1) To achieve consistency along the river, the Riverwalk standard approved balustrade detail is to be used on all public riverside sites.
(2) Pedestrian handrails:
(a) where required, are designed to suit both pedestrians and cyclists and must be designed in compliance with AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility, Enhanced and additional requirements – Buildings and facilities and Austroads Guide to Engineering Practice, Part 14 ‘Bicycles’;
(b) 316 stainless steel is an acceptable material for handrails, with minimum finish str 400 grit (Ra <0.5 micron) – bright polished finish.
(3) Cyclist holding rails are provided where there is a likelihood that cyclists will have to stop at intersections or crossing points (Austroads Guide to Engineering Practice, Part 14 ‘Bicycles’ provides guidance).

12.8 Furniture

12.8.1 General

(1) Furniture is required in public riverside sites to provide opportunities for users to enjoy the amenity of the riverside.
(2) Furniture and facilities may include seating, litter bins, drinking fountains, bollards, pedestrian lighting, picnic and barbeque facilities, shelters, end of trip facilities for cyclists, including, bike racks and toilets.
(3) Chapter 10 of this planning scheme policy provides guidance on furniture requirements in parks.

12.8.2 Design specifications and guidelines

(1) The provision of furniture conforms to the latest edition of the following:
(a) AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility, Enhanced and additional requirements – Buildings and facilities;
(b) AS 2890.3-1993 Parking facilities - Bicycle parking facilities.
(2) Chapter 3 of this planning scheme policy provides Council’s standard furniture range to be installed as part of public riverside facilities.

12.8.3 Detailed design standards

12.8.3.1 Furniture

(1) Public riverside facilities are not over cluttered with furniture and the minimum amount of furniture is provided to suit the purpose of the facility.
(2) The furniture required is agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis during the development assessment process.
(3) The Council furniture suite is used on all riverside sites and the suite includes seats, bollards, drop-down bollards, pedestrian light, litter bin enclosure and a drinking fountain (Chapter 3 of this planning scheme policy provides further detail).
(4) The type and layout of furniture at a public riverside facility depends on its intended use, the intended users, the anticipated intensity of use and specific requirements for the site.
(5) Furniture is located to:
(a) provide opportunities for casual surveillance;
(b) take advantage of, or provide for, shade and shelter;
(c) avoid creating obstacles, with special consideration given to people with physical and visual disabilities;
(d) channel, direct and segregate movement of different users;
(e) create layouts appropriate to desired usage and users;
(f) take advantage of views of the river, activities and features of interest;
(g) minimise collection of rubbish in crevices (i.e. windborne and user-generated);
(h) be outside of the continuous path of travel and the obstacle-free zone;
(i) provide a minimum of 0.5m lateral clearance from the edge of a path to any obstacles, where adjacent to a path.
(6) Through both its design and siting, furniture is accessible for all users, with consideration given to people with disabilities and children.

12.8.3.2 Seating

Seating:

(a) is arranged to provide the opportunity for a variety of experiences and to take advantage of the site’s natural and built features and the site’s views;
(b) is located to create opportunities for casual surveillance;
(c) is spaced dependent on the site and its features;
(d) is spaced at greater amounts where the path of travel is greater than a gradient of 1:33 (1V:33H);
(e) is provided at 20m intervals where paths are provided primarily for recreation;
(f) is provided at 100m intervals where paths are provided predominantly for commuting;
(g) in groups is provided in association with viewing points, water access points, activity nodes, picnic nodes and at entrances for waiting;
(h) has a clear zone of 1.2m in front of the seat for access where seats are adjacent to a path;
(i) is provided with a minimum 1.2m wide paved area at one end and 1m minimum between seats, to allow for wheelchairs or prams to be parked adjacent;
(j) is located on a maximum gradient in any direction of no greater than 1V:40H;
(k) is sited and fixed with consideration of the effect of crossfalls.

12.8.3.3 Bins

(1) Bins:
(a) are for high use areas;
(b) for litter should be co-located with recycling bins;
(c) are located in association with seats or at entrances and activity nodes;
(d) are provided with a minimum 1.2m2 paved area clear of the bin to allow access for wheelchairs;
(e) are located where they can be easily accessed for collection of waste;
(f) do not obstruct circulation or views to the river.
(2) The need for litter bins within public riverside facilities will vary and is to be agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis.

12.8.3.4 Drinking fountains

Drinking fountains:

(a) within public riverside facilities will vary and this is to be agreed with Council on a site-by- site basis;
(b) are located near entrances to paths or in association with seats and activity nodes;
(c) are located outside of the obstacle-free zone of pathways;
(d) must be accessible for people in wheelchairs;
(e) must contain a minimum 1.2m2 paved area clear of the drinking fountain to allow for wheelchair access.

12.8.3.5 Bollards

Bollards:

(a) should be limited in use;
(b) are used to restrict vehicle access, protect pedestrian and cycle areas, highlight areas of potential conflict and guide path users;
(c) are spaced at 1.4m intervals;
(d) that drop down or are removable are required where access is needed for emergency or maintenance vehicles;
(e) are unlockable using an Allen key for 10mm stainless steel internal hex head;
(f) are cycle friendly where located on a path likely to receive heavy or frequent use;
(g) that are taller than ones of 0.3m diameter are preferred;
(h) have further guidance in the AustRoads Guide to Engineering Practice - Part 14 – ‘Bicycles’ and the Australian Road Rules.

12.8.3.6 Picnic and barbeque facilities

Picnic and barbeque facilities:

(a) are appropriate in areas where public riverside facilities abut adjacent parkland or a new riverside park is being created;
(b) may not be suitable in all parks and their provision and design is agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis.

12.8.3.7 Shade

For shade structures, refer to section 12.11.

12.8.3.8 Bicycle parking facilities

Bicycle parking facilities:

(a) provide short-term bicycle parking rails, to which the frame and both wheels can be locked, in accordance with AS 2890.3-1993 Parking facilities - Bicycle parking facilities;
provide bicycle parking rails adjacent to entrances, long-stay seating areas, viewing points, cyclist destinations and other activity nodes;
arrange rails in accordance with the ‘Typical Bicycle Parking Modules’ in AustRoads Guide to Engineering Facilities, Part 14 – ‘Cyclists’;
provide signage as appropriate, to assist with use, in accordance with AS 2890.3-1993 Parking facilities - Bicycle parking facilities.

12.8.3.9 Toilets

(1) Toilets:
(a) are only provided where the number of long-stay visitors are expected be high and there are no public toilets nearby;
(b) are only provided where a need is agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis;
(c) are of unisex design and accessible to AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities;
(2) Further guidance is set out in Chapter 11 of this planning scheme policy.

12.9 Lighting

12.9.1 General

Lighting is provided for personal safety, to enable pedestrians and cyclists to perceive hazards and for way finding.

12.9.2 Design specifications and guidelines

Lighting conforms to the latest edition of the following:
(a) AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities;
(b) AS/NZS 1158.3.1:2005 Lighting for roads and public spaces - Pedestrian area (Category P) lighting – Performance and design requirements;
(c) AS 1158.4-1987 The lighting of urban roads and other public thoroughfares - Supplementary lighting at pedestrian crossings;
(d) Refer to Chapter 3—Road corridor design for Council’s standard lighting to be installed as part of public riverside facilities.

12.9.3 Detailed design standards

(1) For approvals:
(a) lighting design is approved as part of the detailed design application for public riverside facilities;
electrical layout is to be approved by Energex;
lighting design and electrical layout provided in Standard Energex works plan format.
(2) All riverside paths are lit and use the Council furniture suite pole/luminaire/lamp combination.
(3) Illumination levels for pedestrians and cyclists are in accordance with AS/NZS 1158.3.1:2005 Lighting for roads and public spaces - Pedestrian area (Category P) lighting – Performance and design requirements.
(4) Lighting is located outside of the continuous path of travel and the obstacle-free zone, a minimum of 7m from trunks of trees.
(5) Lighting falls predominantly onto the path or the facility to assist with casual surveillance and minimise potential light pollution to adjacent land users.
(6) Cut-off lighting is used where appropriate to direct light away from adjacent residences.
(7) Luminaires and layout to ensure that unevenness and glare do not accentuate problems for people with vision impairment.
(8) Lighting to signs is to be provided.

12.10 Planting and riparian vegetation

12.10.1 General

(1) Planting within public riverside facilities is used to enhance biodiversity values and water quality; to assist in riverbank stabilisation, to provide landscape amenity and contribute to the desired landscape character of the site.
(2) Planting includes aquatic, riparian and other terrestrial vegetation.

12.10.2 Design specifications and guidelines

Planting within public riverside facilities conforms to the latest edition of the following:

(a) Fisheries Act 1994;
(b) AS 4373-2007 Pruning of amenity trees;
(c) Natural Assets Local Law.

12.10.3 Detailed design standards

12.10.3.1 General

The Waterway corridors overlay code provides the desired outcomes for each of the 5 Brisbane River corridor sections.

12.10.3.2 Vegetation

(1) Development proposals must retain any existing native vegetation including mangroves and other riparian vegetation and supplement where appropriate.
(2) Where native vegetation does not exist it is included in the riparian zone as part of any development proposal.
(3) All marine plants such as mangroves are protected under Queensland law through the Fisheries Act 1994, and approval must be sought from the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry for removal or pruning of mangroves.

12.10.3.3 Height clearance

Height clearance:

(a) a minimum 2.4m height clearance is provided for the full width of the path;
(b) where access is required for emergency and maintenance vehicles, a minimum 3.6m height clearance for the full width of the path is provided;
(c) where adjacent to paths and facilities, choose appropriate species and specify with a single stem to ensure that height clearances can be maintained without compromising the form and shape of the tree.

12.10.3.4 Shade

Effective shade is provided within public riverside facilities through appropriate species selection and location of trees.

12.10.3.5 Views

Views:

(a) when selecting species and locating trees consider views to and from adjacent properties, including from the opposite side of the river, to avoid blocking views when trees have matured;
(b) trees are used to frame views and to mark entrance points and activity nodes.

12.10.3.6 Garden beds

(1) Garden beds:
(a) using shrubs in the planting design of public riverside facilities is acceptable where space permits;
(b) pathways are kept clear and crime prevention through environmental design principles are adhered to;
(c) species used are appropriate to the harsh marine environment and character of the river corridor section and the specific site.
(2) Plants located adjacent to entrances and crossing points grow to a maximum of 600mm to ensure visibility for users, without the need for excessive pruning.
(3) The recommended plant species list contained in the Planting species planning scheme policy provides guidance on species selection.

12.11 Shade and shelter

12.11.1 General

Well-shaded areas are essential for people’s enjoyment of public riverside facilities.

12.11.2 Detailed design standards

12.11.2.1 Shade and positioning

(1) Shade for riverside facilities:
(a) includes shade for public riverside facilities provided through the use of shade trees rather than built structures;
(b) includes shade structures at viewing points provided where shade does not already exist and at picnic nodes;
(c) includes shade trees provided along pedestrian and bicycle paths;
(d) should have 90% shade coverage of the path once trees have reached maturity;
(e) uses species that will not be a trip or slip hazard to cyclists and pedestrians through dropped leaf, flower or seed matter;
(f) is provided by shaded nodes along the path at maximum 100m intervals where continuous shade is not possible due to site constraints;
(g) is provided through a sufficient number of shade trees that provide good coverage of shade on maturity;
(h) provides shade for seats from shade trees at key locations.
(2) Orientation of facilities:
(a) where possible, orientate structures and plantings so that wider sides are placed on an east–west axis;
(b) provide wider overhangs, vertical barriers and/or cast shade to east and west orientations to limit entry of direct and indirect ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Vertical barriers may also assist in reducing glare from surrounding surfaces such as water and concrete.
(3) Seasonal requirements:
(a) a variety of shaded areas is provided that offer comfortable protection for different times of the year;
(b) during the warmer parts of the year, plan shade areas to exclude direct sun and encourage cool breezes;
(c) during cooler seasons, design shade to admit warmth and light and screen cold winter winds.

12.11.2.2 Materials and finishes

(1) Surfaces finishes minimise the reflection of UVR. As a general rule of thumb, choose finishes which are darker in colour, soft and textured. However, refrain from using very dark colours for pavement surfaces and rubber softfall.
(2) Surfaces finishes such as grass and natural ground covers are preferable to manufactured materials where appropriate.
(3) Materials are chosen with maximum UVR protection ratings.
(4) Materials are used that offer consistent protection for the life of the structure.
(5) When degenerative materials are used, maintenance schedules are implemented which specify regular inspections and appropriate replacement dates to ensure consistent levels of protection.
(6) The character of the structure is appropriate for the landscape character of a site, including the river corridor sections as well as the specific site and adjoining sites.

12.11.2.3 Vegetation

(1) Planting provides effective shade through the choice of appropriate tree species and their arrangement.
(2) When planting a number of trees in close proximity, arrange them in clusters so that canopies overlap. Single trees can be less shade effective as they offer a smaller area of cover than trees planted in groups.
(3) Broad, dark-coloured leaf species are preferable, and using palm trees is avoided.
(4) Dense leaf species are chosen and arranged in groves to create a sizeable area of consistent cover.
(5) Vegetation is chosen to enhance the microclimate. Shrubs can provide wind screening and tree canopies can also shade hard surfaces and pavements to limit UVR reflection and heat build-up.
(6) Vegetation is to be planned so that there is access to deeper areas of shade beneath canopies. Where possible, avoid using planting beds and mulched areas directly beneath tree canopies as these prevent the use of deeper, more protective shade near the trunk of a tree.

12.12 Signage

12.12.1 General

(1) Signage is utilised at public riverside facilities to assist users with way finding and interpretation and to enhance the facility’s identity and safety.
(2) Signage is used to identify a facility such as a park name and could also include regulatory signs, signs warning of potential safety hazards, directional signs, interpretive or informative signs.

12.12.2 Design specifications and guidelines

All signage conforms to the latest edition of the following:
(a) Australian Road Rules, http://www.ntc.gov.au;
AS 1742.9-1986 Manual of uniform traffic control devices - Bicycle facilities;
AS 1742.10-2009 Manual of uniform traffic control devices - Pedestrian control and protection’;
Disability Discrimination Act 1992;
Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC) Advisory notes on access to premises, issued under section 67(1)(k) of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992;
AS 1428.1-2009 Design for access and mobility - General requirements for access - Buildings and facilities;
AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities;
Brisbane City Council, Advertisements Policy January 1999: Local Law Policy Control of Outdoor Advertising;
Effective Colour Contrast: Designing for People with Partial Sight and Colour Deficiencies, Lighthouse International;
Making Text Legible: Designing for People with Partial Sight, Lighthouse International;
Guide to Engineering Practice, ‘Pedestrians’, Part 13, Austroads;
Guide to Engineering Practice, ‘Bicycles’, Part 14, Austroads;
AS 2416-2002 Design and application of water safety and signs;
AS 2899.2 Public information symbol signs - Water safety signs.

12.12.3 Detailed design standards

12.12.3.1 General

(1) Development proposals for public riverside facilities include a signage plan that identifies the hierarchy, design and layout of signs as well as how they relate to signage on adjoining and nearby facilities.
(2) Advertising signage is subject to approval in accordance with Council’s Advertisements Policy January 1999: Local Law Policy Control of Outdoor Advertising.
(3) Signs relating to Council’s assets and facilities (e.g. ferry terminals, parks) are developed in consultation with Council to ensure they are consistent with Council’s corporate signage requirements.
(4) Signage layout and design respects and reflects the character of the site and complements signage within the broader river corridor precinct. Signage is clearly legible and has a consistent style.

12.12.3.2 Siting

(1) When planning the layout of signage consider visibility and accessibility for all users, functional requirements and landscape character of the site, maintenance requirements and safety hazards.
(2) Minimise impacts on the visual amenity of the site by ensuring that signs are an appropriate scale and are appropriately located.
(3) Minimise clutter at public riverside facilities by minimising the overall number of signs and being strategic in their design and location. Design signs are modular to cater for additional signage requirements in the future.

12.12.3.3 Accessible riverside facilities

(1) Signage is designed with consideration for the requirements of persons with limited or impaired vision as well as other disabilities.
(2) International symbols for accessibility are used to identify the continuous path of travel and access to facilities.
(3) Signs and symbols are to be in accordance with AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities.

12.12.3.4 Regulatory signs

(1) Regulatory signs are traffic control devices in the form of signs, signals or pavement markings, which are placed or erected for the purpose of regulating, warning or guiding path users.
(2) Regulatory signs are provided as necessary in accordance with the Australian Road Rules, AS 1742.9-1986 Manual of uniform traffic control devices - Bicycle facilities, AS 1742.10-2009 Manual of uniform traffic control devices - Pedestrian control and protection and Guide to Traffic Engineering Practice, Part 13 –‘Pedestrians’ and Part 14 – ‘Bicycles’.
(3) In some locations, line marking may be appropriate in lieu of signs.
(4) Line marking is to conform to AS 1742.9-1986 Manual of uniform traffic control devices - Bicycle facilities.
(5) Warning signs are used only where there is a hazard that would not be obvious to approaching users, and their provision is necessary for safety.
(6) Paths are designed to avoid the creation of potential hazards, but where this cannot be achieved, signs are provided as necessary in accordance with Guide to Engineering Practice, Part 13 – ‘Pedestrians’ and Part 14 – ‘Bicycles’.
(7) Audio or tactile components to signs are provided as appropriate for people who are vision impaired in accordance with AS 1428.1-2009 Design for access and mobility - General requirements for access – New building work, AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities and AS/NZS 1428.4.1:2009 Design for access and mobility - Means to assist the orientation of people with vision impairment - Tactile ground surface indicators.

12.12.3.5 Directional signs

(1) For first time or infrequent users, well placed and designed directional signage will assist with way finding and the perception of personal safety.
(2) Directional signs are provided at regular intervals but at least at every major change of direction and at site entrances.
(3) Directional signs include signs to:
(a) entrances and exits;
(b) destinations – principal and intermediate;
(c) links to adjacent roads, paths and public transport facilities;
(d) toilets and other facilities;
(e) places of interest.
(4) Directional signs include a route name or logo for particular sites or paths where appropriate.
(5) Comply with AS 1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and additional requirements - Buildings and facilities and consider the different requirements of pedestrians and cyclists in accordance with Guide to Traffic Engineering Practice, Part 13 – ‘Pedestrians’ and Part 14 – ‘Bicycles’.

12.12.3.6 Interpretive signs

(1) Interpretive signs are provided where the site is of cultural or natural heritage significance.
(2) Heritage significance may include Aboriginal culture, other cultural or natural history of the site or the local area.
(3) Where possible provide interpretive signs in conjunction with historic remnants that have been preserved in situ.
(4) The information included in the signs is thoroughly researched and sensitively and accurately presented, and the information and signage design is approved by Council.
(5) Historic park signs follow the format used by Council.
(6) The need for interpretive information is available in alternative format for people unable to read signs are agreed with Council on a site-by-site basis.
(7) Map boards are provided on major riverside sites that include information on the site, the facilities provided and links to destinations, adjacent facilities and features of interest.
(8) Interpretive signs and map boards are lit where they are located within a night-time facility.
(9) Where appropriate, maps and interpretive signage are combined to avoid clutter.
(10) Interpretive signs and map boards suit the character of the river precinct corridor and are to complement those in adjoining and nearby sites. They are constructed of durable materials.
(11) Lighting for maps and information signage is provided to assist with way finding after dark.
(12) Lighting is approved by Council.
(13) The electrical layout of lighting is approved by Energex – Asset Services. Early consultation is held with Council and Energex.

12.13 Public art

12.13.1 General

Any proposal to include public art in public riverside facilities must be done as per Chapter 6 of this planning scheme policy.

12.13.2 Detailed design standards

12.13.2.1 General

(1) Public art is of a scale and design appropriate to the landscape character of the public riverside facility and its river corridor section.
(2) Public art must be located so as not to impede circulation or significantly block views.
(3) Public art should be a high quality, durable product.
(4) The retention and re-siting of artefacts from the site is appropriate within riverside sites in agreement with Council.
(5) Public art is subject to a risk assessment prior to installation to ensure, as much as possible, that it does not pose a safety risk.
(6) Public art items must not have any protrusions or sharp edges that could be a hazard to users of public riverside facilities.
(7) Public art items are designed to prevent entrapment.
(8) Public art in public riverside facilities is to comply with AS 1924.2-1981 Playground equipment for parks, schools and domestic use - Design and construction - Safety aspects.
(9) Developers are required to undertake community consultation in relation to public art, depending on the purpose and scale of the art. Council will consider the proposed design on a site-by-site basis.
(10) Public art or artefacts is appropriate in the following locations in riverside sites:
(a) activity nodes;
(b) entrances – to create entrance statements and gateways;
(c) to provide landmarks and features of interest within the sites and the river corridor;
(d) away from the riverside to connect to the river through visual cues.

12.13.2.2 Lighting

(1) Depending on the size and nature of the artwork, public art is feature lit.
(2) Lighting for public art is considered separately from the requirement for pedestrian lighting.
(3) Development proposals for lighting within public riverside facilities consider the impact of lighting within the facility and from adjoining properties.
(4) The impact on adjoining residential properties is minimised.
(5) The design is approved by Council – City lighting section.
(6) The electrical layout is to be approved by Energex – Asset Services. Early consultation is held with Council and Energex in the design development of the public art.

12.14 Ownership

(1) Riverside land and facilities provided by the applicant are to be reserved to the Crown, with Council nominated as trustee responsible for maintenance.
(2) Where facilities are below high water mark, tenure arrangements need to be discussed with the relevant Queensland government department.
^ Back to Top