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8.2.4 Biodiversity areas overlay code

8.2.4.1 Application

(1) This code applies to assessing development in the Biodiversity areas overlay, if:
(a) assessable development where this code is an applicable code identified in the assessment benchmarks column of a table of assessment for an overlay (section 5.10); or
(b) impact assessable development.
(2) Land in the Biodiversity areas overlay is identified on the Biodiversity areas overlay map and is included in the following sub-categories:
(a) High ecological significance sub-category;
(b) General ecological significance sub-category;
(c) Priority koala habitat area sub-category;
(d) Koala habitat area sub-category.
(3) When using this code, reference should be made to section 1.5 and section 5.3.3.
(4) A neighbourhood plan code may vary the application of this code. Where that occurs, the neighbourhood plan code prevails to the extent it varies from this code.

Note—The following purpose, overall outcomes, performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes comprise the assessment benchmarks of this code.

Note—Where this code includes performance outcomes or acceptable outcomes that relate to:

Note—Biodiversity areas mapping:

Note—In accordance with the Environmental Offsets Act 2014, environmental offsets as identified in performance outcome PO9 and acceptable outcome AO9 of this code will be applicable only where development will or is likely to have a significant residual impact on matters of local environmental significance or matters of State environmental significance and all reasonable on-site mitigation measures for the development have been, or will be, undertaken.

8.2.4.2 Purpose

(1) The purpose of the Biodiversity areas overlay code is to:
(a) Implement the policy direction in the Strategic framework, in particular:
(i) Theme 3: Brisbane’s clean and green leading environmental performance and Element 3.1 – Brisbane’s environmental values;
(ii) Theme 5: Brisbane’s CityShape and Element 5.6 – Brisbane’s Greenspace System.
(b) Provide for the assessment of the suitability of development in the Biodiversity areas overlay.
(c) Provide for matters of local environmental significance and matters of State environmental significance.
(2) The purpose of the code will be achieved through the following overall outcomes:
(a) Conservation, consolidation, connection and restoration of the network of lands with in-situ values or areas of strategic biodiversity value within Brisbane.
(b) Protection and enhancement of waterways and foreshores with significant biodiversity values.
(c) Protection and enhancement of wetlands with significant biodiversity values and their hydrological value and water-cleaning functions.
(d) Protection, enhancement and restoration of koala habitat and the facilitation of safe koala movement to assist in the long-term retention of a viable koala population within South East Queensland.
(e) Avoidance of impacts to biodiversity values, ecological features and ecological processes through the placement of development within a development footprint plan.
(f) All reasonable on-site measures to avoid and mitigate impacts on biodiversity values from the development have been, or will be, undertaken.
(g) Provision for environmental offsets that achieve an equivalent environmental outcome, where development will or is likely to have a significant residual impact on matters of local environmental significance or matters of State environmental significance.

8.2.4.3 Performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes

Table 8.2.4.3.A—Performance outcomes and acceptable outcomes
Performance outcomes
Acceptable outcomes
Section A—If for a dwelling house or associated filling or excavation
PO1
Development is within a single development footprint sited to:
(a) minimise the clearing and fragmentation of native vegetation, including any vegetative growth and material of vegetative origin, whether living or dead, including trunks, branches, stems, leaves, fruits and flowers, and ecological features within the Biodiversity areas overlay;
(b) maximise the extent of habitat restoration of areas of strategic biodiversity value within the High ecological significance sub-category on the Biodiversity areas overlay.

Note—An ecological assessment prepared in accordance with the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy can assist in demonstrating achievement of this performance outcome.

Note—A development footprint may be used to fulfil recommendations of an ecological assessment. A development footprint plan can be shown on a plan of survey or be part of approved development.

AO1.1
Development ensures that the dwelling house is contained within a single development footprint plan, that minimises the proportion of the development footprint within the High ecological significance sub-category and the General ecological significance sub-category.

Note—Where there is no approved development footprint plan, a development footprint plan is to be prepared to support this acceptable outcome and this plan forms part of the approved development.

AO1.2
Development ensures that the dwelling house is contained within a single development footprint plan, no greater than:
(a) 1000m2 where in the Low density residential zone, the Low-medium density residential zone, the Medium density residential zone, High density residential zone or the Character residential zone; or
(b) 2500m2 where in the Environmental management zone, the Conservation zone, the Emerging community zone, the Rural zone or the Rural residential zone, as shown in Figure a.
AO1.3
Development ensures that management of vegetation undertaken to reduce risk from bushfire hazard, as demonstrated through a Bushfire Management Plan, occurs within a single bushfire management footprint plan no greater than 1500m2 which adjoins the development footprint plan. Refer to Figure c.
PO2
Development ensures that ecological features and ecological processes, koala habitat trees, areas of strategic biodiversity value and wetlands are protected to ensure their long-term viability.
AO2
Development ensures that the development footprint plan conserves ecological features (including significant vegetation communities listed in Table 8.2.4.3.B, significant flora species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.C, or significant fauna species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.D), koala habitat trees, areas of strategic biodiversity value and wetlands in a spatial configuration which:
(a) conserves areas within the High ecological significance sub-category that connect habitat;
(b) maximises the size and consolidates areas to be conserved for biodiversity purposes on site;
(c) provides connectivity between areas to be conserved for biodiversity purposes on site;
(d) excludes filling or excavation from areas to be conserved for biodiversity, except where it is directly associated with habitat restoration.
Section B—If for filling or excavation
PO3
Filling or excavation protects the High ecological significance sub-category, General ecological significance sub-category, ecological features (including significant vegetation communities listed in Table 8.2.4.3.B, significant flora species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.C, or significant fauna species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.D), koala habitat trees, areas with strategic biodiversity value, and wetlands, and mitigates the impact on ecological processes.

Note—Guidance on identifying koala habitat is included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

Note—Where proposing development within the High ecological significance sub-category or the General ecological significance sub-category, refer to section 8.2.4.1 Application of this code with regard to satisfying the Purpose of the code and this performance outcome.

AO3
Development ensures that filling or excavation, other than where directly associated with habitat restoration, is contained within an area located entirely outside of:
(a) the High ecological significance sub-category;
(b) the General ecological significance sub-category;
(c) the tree protection zone of non-juvenile koala habitat trees as shown in Figure b.

Note—A tree survey prepared in accordance with the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy can assist in demonstrating achievement of acceptable outcome (c).

Section C
If a site is wholly or partly in the High ecological significance sub-category
PO4
Development ensures that ecological features and ecological processes, koala habitat trees, areas of strategic biodiversity value, waterways and wetlands within the High ecological significance sub-category are protected, conserved and restored to ensure the area's long-term viability.

Note—Where proposing development within the High ecological significance sub-category or the General ecological significance sub-category, refer to section 8.2.4.1 Application of this code with regard to satisfying the Purpose of the code and this performance outcome. The proposed solution must provide the same level of service without significant disruption of biodiversity values or outcomes.

AO4.1
Development:
(a) ensures that the development footprint, including roads, services, stormwater management infrastructure, any associated filling or excavation works and any fire management access and buffers, are located wholly outside the High ecological significance sub-category; or
(b) complies with AO4.2, AO4.3 and AO4.4.
AO4.2
Development ensures that the development footprint, design and layout are informed by an ecological assessment which:
(a) identifies and evaluates biodiversity values, ecological features (including significant vegetation communities listed in Table 8.2.4.3.B, significant flora species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.C, or significant fauna species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.D), koala habitat trees, areas of strategic biodiversity value, waterways and wetlands;
(b) identifies the likely impacts of the development to biodiversity;
(c) outlines how any potential impacts on biodiversity will be avoided and mitigated.

Note—Guidance on completing an ecological assessment, development design and identifying koala habitat are included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

AO4.3
Development ensures that the development footprint, design and layout conserves ecological features (including significant vegetation communities listed in Table 8.2.4.3.B, significant flora species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.C, or significant fauna species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.D), koala habitat trees and wetlands in a spatial configuration which:
(a) conserves areas within the High ecological significance sub-category that connect habitat or areas of strategic biodiversity value which have the capacity to connect habitat upon being restored;
(b) maximises the size and consolidates areas to be conserved for biodiversity purposes on site and in combination with adjoining sites;
(c) provides connectivity between areas to be conserved for biodiversity purposes on site and with adjoining sites;
(d) minimises the edge-to-area ratio of areas to be conserved for biodiversity purposes to limit edge effects;
(e) minimises fragmentation by infrastructure;
(f) includes a single development footprint plan for each new residential lot to be created which is:
(ii) 2500m2 or less where on a lot in the Environmental management zone, the Conservation zone, the Emerging community zone, the Rural zone or the Rural residential zone;
(g) excludes filling or excavation from areas to be conserved for biodiversity, except where it is directly associated with habitat restoration.

Note—Guidance on development design is included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

AO4.4
Development is designed to minimise edge effects by locating land uses compatible with the long-term preservation of biodiversity adjacent to areas within the High ecological significance sub-category, including:
(a) esplanade roads and pathways;
(b) landscaping or habitat restoration areas consisting of local indigenous plant species;
(c) open space land uses;
(d) employee or communal recreation areas;
(e) stormwater management infrastructure where adopting water sensitive urban design solutions.

Note—Guidance on development design to minimise edge effects is included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

If a site is wholly or partly in the High ecological significance sub-category, where involving a new road
PO5
Development for a road is designed and constructed to facilitate the safe movement of native fauna.
AO5
Development incorporates location-specific wildlife movement solutions, on any roads which dissect an area within the High ecological significance sub-category.

Note—Locations for wildlife movement solutions may be indicated on the Streetscape hierarchy overlay mapping. Guidance on wildlife movement infrastructure is included in the Infrastructure design planning scheme policy

If a site is wholly or partly in the General ecological significance sub-category
PO6
Development ensures that ecological features and ecological processes, koala habitat trees, areas of strategic biodiversity value and wetlands within the General ecological significance sub-category area are protected, conserved and restored to ensure the area's long-term viability.

Note—Where proposing development within the High ecological significance sub-category or the General ecological significance sub-category, refer to section 8.2.4.1 Application of this code with regard to satisfying the Purpose of the code and this performance outcome. The proposed solution must provide the same level of service without significant disruption of biodiversity values or outcomes.

AO6.1
Development:
(a) ensures that the development footprint including roads, services, stormwater management infrastructure, any associated filling or excavation works and any fire management access and buffers, are located wholly outside the General ecological significance sub-category; or
(b) Complies with AO6.2 and AO6.3
AO6.2
Development ensures that the development footprint, design and layout are informed by an ecological assessment which:
(a) identifies and evaluates biodiversity values, ecological features (including significant vegetation communities listed in Table 8.2.4.3.B, significant flora species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.C, or significant fauna species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.D), koala habitat trees, areas of strategic biodiversity value, waterways and wetlands;
(b) identifies the likely impacts of the development to biodiversity;
(c) outlines how any potential impacts on biodiversity will be avoided and mitigated.

Note—Guidance on completing an ecological assessment, development design and identifying koala habitat are included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

AO6.3
Development ensures that the development footprint, design and layout conserves ecological features (including significant vegetation communities listed in Table 8.2.4.3.B, significant flora species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.C, or significant fauna species listed in Table 8.2.4.3.D), koala habitat trees, waterways and wetlands in a spatial configuration which:
(a) maximises the size and consolidates areas of strategic biodiversity value to be conserved for biodiversity purposes on site and in combination with adjoining sites;
(b) maximises connectivity between areas to be conserved for biodiversity purposes on site and with adjoining sites;
(c) minimises the edge-to-area ratio of areas to be conserved for biodiversity purposes to limit edge effects;
(d) minimises fragmentation by infrastructure;
(e) includes a single development footprint plan for each new residential lot to be created which is:
(ii) 2500m2 or less where on a lot in the Environmental management zone, the Conservation zone, the Emerging community zone, the Rural zone or the Rural residential zone;
(f) excludes filling or excavation from areas to be conserved for biodiversity except where it is directly associated with habitat restoration or revegetation works.

Note—Guidance on development design is included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

If a site is wholly or partly in the Priority koala habitat area sub-category or Koala habitat area sub-category, where not in the High ecological significance sub-category, or General ecological significance sub-category
PO7
Development is located and designed to protect and enhance koala habitat by:
(a) reducing threats to resident and transient koalas;
(b) protecting the maximum number of non-juvenile koala habitat trees in the Koala habitat area sub-category and the Priority koala habitat area sub-category;
(c) consolidating and maximising the size of areas to be conserved on site and in combination with adjoining sites;
(d) minimising the edge-to-area ratio of areas to be conserved, to limit edge effects;
(e) providing connectivity and safe koala movement between koala habitat areas.
(f) minimising fragmentation by infrastructure, particularly roads;
(g) excluding filling and excavation from areas to be conserved.

Note—Guidance on identifying koala habitat is included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

Note—Where proposing development within the High ecological significance sub-category or the General ecological significance sub-category, refer to section 8.2.4.1 Application of this code with regard to satisfying the Purpose of the code and this performance outcome. The proposed solution must provide the same level of service without significant disruption of biodiversity values or outcomes.

AO7.1
Development ensures that the development footprint, design and layout, including roads, are informed by an ecological assessment which identifies koala habitat trees, movement corridors and the likely impacts to koala habitat as a result of the development.

Note—Guidance on identifying koala habitat, completing an ecological assessment and designing development to protect koalas isincluded in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

AO7.2
Development ensures that the development footprint, design and layout:
(a) protects non-juvenile koala habitat trees;
(b) maximises the size and consolidates areas to be conserved as koala habitat on site and in combination with adjoining sites;
(c) maximises connectivity between non-juvenile koala habitat trees which will be conserved on site and with adjoining sites;
(d) excludes filling or excavation from the tree protection zone of non-juvenile koala habitat trees. Refer to Figure b.
AO7.3
Development ensures that landscaping and open space areas incorporate koala habitat trees.
PO8
Development design and layout facilitates the safe movement of koalas through the landscape.
AO8.1
Development ensures that fencing or other barriers are designed to allow safe koala movement, and to exclude koalas from areas containing domestic or security dogs.

Note—Guidance on designing development to protect koalas is included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

AO8.2
Development incorporates infrastructure solutions which facilitate the movement of koalas across a road which dissects bushland within the Priority koala habitat area sub-category or Koala habitat area sub-category.

Note—Guidance on wildlife movement solutions suited to use by koalas is included in the Biodiversity areas planning scheme policy.

Note—Further guidance on wildlife movement solutions is included in the Infrastructure design planning scheme policy.

If a site is wholly or partly located in the High ecological significance sub-category or the General ecological significance sub-category, other than for a dwelling house
PO9
Development which has or is likely to have a significant residual impact on a matter of State environmental signficance or a matter of local environmental significance, after all reasonable on-site mitigation measures have been or will be undertaken, provides an environmental offset.

Note— Environmental offsets are provided in compliance with the Queensland environmental offsets framework and the Offsets planning scheme policy.

AO9
No acceptable outcomes is prescribed.

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Table 8.2.4.3.B—Significant vegetation communities (regional ecosystems)

Significant vegetation communities (regional ecosystems) are:

(a) those listed as endangered or of concern under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999;
(b) those listed as 'endangered' or 'of concern' under the Vegetation Management Act 1999;
(c) those identified as being of city-wide significance (less than 40% of pre-clearing area remaining) within the Brisbane local government area.

Note—Each Regional Ecosystem Code (RE Code) is derived from the Conservation Status of Queensland's Bioregional Ecosystems (Sattler and Williams, 1999).

Note—Changes to Commonwealth and State listing of vegetation communities may occur. As such, the Commonwealth and State status of vegetation communities will need to be checked by the applicant.

RE Code
South East Queensland regional ecosystem descriptions
12.9-10.16
Araucarian microphyll to notophyll vine forest on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.7a
Eucalyptus tereticornis, Eucalyptus siderophloia and/or Eucalyptus crebra, Corymbia intermedia and Lophostemon suaveolens woodland. Occurs on Cainozoic and Mesozoic sediments in coastal areas.
12.9-10.7
Eucalyptus crebra woodland on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.4
Eucalyptus racemosa woodland on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.3
Eucalyptus moluccana on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.2/
12.9-10.17
Corymbia citriodora, Eucalyptus crebra open forest on sedimentary rocks / Open forest complex often with Eucalyptus acmenoides, Eucalyptus major, Eucalyptus siderophloia +/- Corymbia citriodora on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.12
Eucalyptus seeana, Corymbia intermedia, Angophora leiocarpa woodland on sedimentary rocks
12.5.3a
Eucalyptus seeana +/- Eucalyptus racemosa subsp. racemosa, Corymbia intermedia, Angophora leiocarpa, Eucalyptus siderophloia, Lophostemon suaveolens open forest. Occurs on complex of remnant Tertiary surfaces +/- Cainozoic and Mesozoic sediments
12.5.3
Eucalyptus tindaliae and/or Eucalyptus racemosa open forest on remnant Tertiary surfaces
12.3.8
Swamps with Cyperus spp., Schoenoplectus spp. and Eleocharis spp.
12.3.7
Eucalyptus tereticornis, Melaleuca viminalis, Casuarina cunninghamiana fringing forest
12.3.6
Melaleuca quinquenervia, Eucalyptus tereticornis, Lophostemon suaveolens woodland on coastal alluvial plains
12.3.5
Melaleuca quinquenervia open-forest on coastal alluvial plains
12.3.3
Eucalyptus tereticornis woodland to open forest on alluvial plains
12.3.11
Eucalyptus siderophloia, Eucalyptus tereticornis, Corymbia intermedia open forest on alluvial plains usually near coast
12.3.1
Gallery rainforest (notophyll vine forest) on alluvial plains
12.12.28
Eucalyptus moluccana open forest on Mesozoic to Proterozoic igneous rocks
12.12.14
Shrubby woodland usually of rocky near coastal areas on Mesozoic to Proterozoic igneous rocks
12.12.12
Eucalyptus tereticornis, Eucalyptus crebra or Eucalyptus siderophloia, Lophostemon suaveolens open forest on granite
12.11.8
Eucalyptus melanophloia, Eucalyptus crebra woodland on metamorphics +/- interbedded volcanics
12.11.5j
Woodland to open forest of Eucalyptus racemosa subsp. racemosa and/or Eucalyptus seeana. Other characteristic species include Lophostemon suaveolens, Corymbia intermedia, Eucalyptus siderophloia, Corymbia citriodora, Eucalyptus pilularis on low-altitude coastal metamorphics around Brisbane. Melaleuca quinquenervia may be present and at times becomes locally co-dominant. Occurs on Palaeozoic and older moderately to strongly deformed and metamorphosed sediments and interbedded volcanics.
12.11.5a
Open forest of Eucalyptus tindaliae, Eucalyptus carnea +/- Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata, Eucalyptus crebra, Eucalyptus major, Eucalyptus helidonica, Corymbia henryi, Angophora woodsiana, Corymbia trachyphloia (away from the coast) or Eucalyptus siderophloia, Eucalyptus microcorys, Eucalyptus racemosa subsp. Racemosa, Eucalyptus propinqua (closer to the coast). Occurs on Palaeozoic and older moderately to strongly deformed and metamorphosed sediments and interbedded volcanics.
12.11.14
Eucalyptus crebra, Eucalyptus tereticornis woodland on metamorphics +/-interbedded volcanics
12.1.1
Casuarina glauca open forest on margins of marine clay plains
12.1.2
Saltpan vegetation including grassland, herbland and sedgeland on marine clay plains.
12.11.1
Simple notophyll vine forest often with abundant Archontophoenix cunninghamiana(gully vine forest) on metamorphics +/- interbedded volcanics.
12.11.10
Notophyll vine forest +/- Arucucaria cunninghamii on metamorphics +/- interbedded volcanics
12.11.11
Araucarian microphyll vine forest on metamorphics +/- interbedded volcanics
12.11.18
Eucalyptus moluccana woodland on metamorphics +/- interbedded volcanics. Usually higher altitudes.
12.11.9
Eucalyptus tereticornis subsp. Tereticornis subsp. basaltica open forest on metamorphics +/- interbedded vocanics. Usually higher altitudes.
12.12.13
Araucarian Complex microphyll to notophyll vine forest on Mesozoic to Proterozoic igneous rocks.
12.12.19x2
Vegetation complex of rocky headlands on sedimentary rocks.
12.12.3
Open forest complex with Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata, Eucalyptus siderophloia or E.crebra, E.major, E.acmenoides or E. helidonica on Mesozoic to proterozoic igneous rocks.
12.2.5
Corymbia intermedia +/- Lophostemon confertus +/- Banksia spp. +/- Callitris columellaris open forest on beach ridges
12.2.7
Melaleuca quinquenervia open forest on sand plains.
12.3.11a
Eucalyptus tereticornis and/or E. siderophloia open forest with vine forest understory on alluvial plains.
12.3.11b
Eucalyptus tereticornis and E. racemosa subsp. racemosa open forest often with shrub layer of Melaleuca nodosa on alluvial plains.
12.3.3a
Eucalyptus crebra, E. tereticornis, Corymbia tessellaris, C. citriodora subsp. variegata woodland to open forest usually on high level Quaternay alluvium.
12.3.3d
Eucalyptus moluccana woodland on Quaternary alluvium
12.3.5a
Melaleuca quinquenervia, Casuarina glauca +/- Eucalyptus tereticornis, E. siderophloia open forest on low coastal alluvial plains
12.3.7c
Billabongs and ox-bow lakes containing either permanent or periodic water bodies
12.5.13a
Microphyll to notophyll vine forest +/- Araucaria cunninghamii on remnant Tertiary surfaces
12.5.1g
Eucalyptus planchoniana and/or E. baileyana dominated woodland to open forest on remnant Tertiary surfaces
12.5.2a
Corymbia intermedia, Eucalyptus tereticornis woodland on remnant Tertiary surfaces, usually in coastal areas with deep red soils
12.5.2b
Eucalyptus tereticornis +/- Corymbia intermedia, Lophostemon suaveolens and C. citriodora subsp. variegata open forest on sub-coastal remnant Tertiary surfaces usually with deep red soils
12.5.4a
Melaleuca quinquenervia woodland on complex of remnant Tertiary surfaces and Cainozoic and Mesozoic sediments
12.5.6b
Eucalyptus siderophloia, Corymbia intermedia, E. propinqua or E. major open forest on remnant Tertiary surfaces. Usually deep red soils
12.5.7
Corymbia citriodora subsp.variegta +/- Eucalyptus crebra, E. helidonica or E. carnea open forest on remnant Tertiary surfaces. Usally deep red soils
12.5.7b
Eucalyptus moluccana open forest on complex of remnant Tertiary surface and Tertiary sedimentary rocks
12.5.7c
Corymbia henryi and/or Eucalyptus fibrosa subsp.fibrosa +/- C. citriodora subsp. variegata, E. major, E. carnea open forest on a complex of remnant Tertiary surfaces and Tertiary sedimentary rocks
12.5.9a
Melaleuca nodosa low open forest on remnant Tertiary surfaces
12.8.17
Eucalyptus melanophloia +/- E. crebra, E. tereticornis, Corymbia tessellaris woodland on Cainozoic igneous rocks
12.8.20
Shrubby woodland with Eucalyptus racemosa subsp. racemosa on Cainozoic igneous rocks
12.8.3
Complex notophyll vine forest on Cainozoic igneous rocks. Altitude <600m
12.9-10.17a
Lophostemon spp. dominated open forest on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.17b
Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata mixed open forest on Cainozoic and Mesozoic sediments
12.9-10.17c
Eucalyptus carnea and /or E. tindaliae and/or E.helidonica open forest on Cainozoic and Mesozoic sediments
12.9-10.17d
Open forest generaly containing Eucalyptus siderophloia, E. propinqua, Corymbia intermedia on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.19a
Corymbia henryi and/or Eucalyptus fibrosa subsp. fibrosa open forest on sedimentary rocks
12.9-10.22
Closed sedgeland/shrubland on sedimentary rocks. Generally coastal
Table 8.2.4.3.C—Significant flora species

Significant flora species are:

(a) those listed as extinct, endangered or vulnerable under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999;
(b) those listed as extinct, endangered, vulnerable or near threatened under the Nature Conservation Act 1992;
(c) those identified as being of city-wide significance within the Brisbane local government area, because they are uncommon, have restricted distribution, are in decline, at risk of local extinction, at the limit of their range or of a disjunct population.
Species name
Common name
Acacia attenuate
whipstick wattle
Acacia baueri subsp. baueri
no common name or plant group
Acacia hispidula
hairy wattle
Acacia juncifolia
rush-leaved wattle
Acacia quadrilateralis
wattle
Acacia mariae
golden-top wattle
Acomis acoma
daisy
Acrostichum aureum
leather fern
Adriana tomentosa var. tomentose
woolly bitterbush
Angophora woodsiana
smudgee
Astrotricha umbrosa
no common name or plant group
Austromyrtus glabra
no common name or plant group
Avicennia marina subsp.Australasica
grey mangrove
Baeckea diosmifolia
fringed baeckea
Banksia oblongifolia
dwarf banksia
Banksia spinulosa var. collina
golden candlesticks
Baumea acuta
pale twig rush
Boronia polygalifolia
dwarf boronia
Boronia rosmarinifolia
forest boronia
Brasenia schreberi
water shield
Capparis velutina
velvet-leaved caper berry
Cassinia compacta
tall cassinia
Chamaecrista concinna
no common name or plant group
Choricarpia leptopetala
brown myrtle
Choricarpia subargentea
giant ironwood
Corchorus cunninghamii
native jute
Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata
spotted gum
Corymbia gummifera
red bloodwood
Corymbia henryi
large-leaf spotted gum
Corymbia intermedia
pink bloodwood
Cupaniopsis shirleyana
wedge-leaved tuckeroo
Cyperus aquatilis
flat sedge
Cyperus semifertilis
missionary nutgrass
Daviesia wyattiana
long-leaved bitter pea
Dillwynia retorta var. phylicoides
hairy parrot pea
Dipodium hamiltonianum
yellow hyacinth orchid
Dipodium pulchellum
hyacinth orchid
Dissiliaria baloghioides
lancewood
Diuris parvipetala
no common name or plant group
Dodonaea peduncularis
stalked hop bush
Drosera binata
fork-leaved sundew
Durringtonia paludosa
no common name or plant group
Echinostephia aculeata
prickly tape vine
Enydra fluctuans
enydra
Epacris obtusifolia
common heath
Eriachne rara
wanderrie grass
Eucalyptus baileyana
Bailey's stringybark
Eucalyptus bancroftii
orange gum
Eucalyptus biturbinata
grey gum
Eucalyptus curtisii
Plunkett mallee
Eucalyptus dura
smooth-branched ironbark
Eucalyptus grandis
flooded gum
Eucalyptus major
Queensland grey gum
Eucalyptus melanophloia
silver-leaf ironbark
Eucalyptus microcorys
tallow wood
Eucalyptus moluccana
gum-topped box
Eucalyptus pilularis
blackbutt
Eucalyptus planchoniana
needlebark stringybark
Eucalyptus propinqua
small-fruited grey gum
Eucalyptus psammitica
sandstone mahogony
Eucalyptus racemosa
scribbly gum
Eucalyptus resinifera
red mahogany
Eucalyptus robusta
swamp mahogany
Eucalyptus saligna
Sydney blue gum
Eucalyptus seeana
narrow leaf red gum
Eucalyptus tereticornis
forest red gum
Eucalyptus tindaliae
Tindale’s stringybark
Ficus opposita var. aculeata
sandpaper fig
Fimbristylis acicularis
rush
Flemingia parviflora
flemingia pea
Gahnia clarkei
tall sawsedge
Gossia gonoclada
angle-stemmed myrtle
Gossia inophloia
no common name or plant group
Hakea plurinervia
Queensland hakea
Haloragis exalata subsp. velutina
no common name or plant group
Hernandia bivalvis
grease nut
Hibbertia diffusa
wedge guinea flower
Homalanthus stillingiifolius
small-leaved bleeding heart
Hovea ramulosa
hovea
Hydrocharis dubia
frogbit
Hygrophila angustifolia
karamat
Hypolepis glandulifera
downy ground fern
Isotropis foliosa
no common name or plant group
Keraudrenia sp. (Chermside S.T.Blake 23068)
no common name or plant group
Leptospermum brachyandrum
weeping tea-tree
Lilaeopsis brisbanica
no common name or plant group
Logania pusilla
no common name or plant group
Lomandra obliqua
lomandra
Lophostemon confertus
brush box
Macadamia integrifolia
macadamia nut
Macadamia ternifolia
Maroochie nut
Macrozamia lucida
pineapple zamia
Macrozamia macleayi
zamia palm
Macrozamia miquelii
zamia
Marsdenia coronata
no common name or plant group
Marsdenia longiloba
slender marsdenia
Maundia triglochinoides
no common name or plant group
Melaleuca decora
decorative paperbark
Melaleuca irbyana
bush-house paperbark
Melichrus procumbens
jam tarts
Mentha diemenica
slender mint
Micrantheum ericoides
no common name or plant group
Myriophyllum latifolium
milfoil
Notelaea lloydii
narrow-leaved mock-olive
Nothoalsomitra suberosa
corky cucumber
Owenia venosa
crow’s apple
Pararistolochia praevenosa
Richmond birdwing vine
Parsonsia brisbanensis
Brisbane parsonsia
Parsonsia eucalyptophylla
gargaloo
Parsonsia lilacina
crisped silkpod
Passiflora herbertiana subsp. herbertiana
native passionfruit
Persicaria elatior
smartweed
Phaius australis
swamp orchid
Phyllanthus microcladus
small-leaved phyllanthus
Picris conyzoides
no common name or plant group
Platylobium formosum
flat pea
Podolobium aciculiferum
needle shaggy pea
Polygala linariifolia
native milkwort
Pomaderris lanigera
woolly pomaderris
Proiphys cunninghamii
Brisbane lily
Pseudovanilla foliata
giant climbing orchid
Pterostylis nigricans
no common name or plant group
Pterostylis scoliosa
no common name or plant group
Pultenaea euchila
orange pultenaea
Pultenaea flexilis
graceful bush-pea
Pultenaea spinosa
spiny bush-pea
Rhinerrhiza divitiflora
raspy root orchid
Rhodomyrtus psidioides
native guava
Ricinocarpos speciosus
no common name or plant group
Sarcochilus dilatatus
brown butterfly orchid
Scaevola ramosissima
purple fan-flower
Scleria novae-hollandiae
sedge
Solanum mentiens
no common name or plant group
Sophora fraseri
brush sophora
Stylidium tenerum
tiny trigger plant
Symplocos harroldii
hairy hazelwood
Thesium australe
austral toadflax
Triglochin microtuberosum
water ribbons
Viola betonicifolia subsp. betonicifolia
showy violet
Westringia eremicola
slender westringia
Xanthorrhoea fulva
swamp grass tree
Xylomelum salicinum
woody pear
Zieria furfuracea subsp. gymnocarpa
Belmont zieria

Table 8.2.4.3.D—Significant fauna species

Significant fauna species are:

(a) those listed as extinct, endangered or vulnerable under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999;
(b) those listed as extinct, endangered, vulnerable or near threatened under the Nature Conservation Act 1992;
(c) those identified as being of city-wide significance within the Brisbane local government area, because they are uncommon, have restricted distribution, are in decline, at risk of local extinction, at the limit of their range or of a disjunct population.
Species name
Common name
Aves (birds)
Accipiter fasciatus
brown goshawk
Accipiter novaehollandiae
grey goshawk
Erythrotriorchis radiatus
red goshawk
Circus approximans
swamp harrier
Aquila audax
wedge-tailed eagle
Haliaeetus leucogaster
white-bellied sea eagle
Lophoictinia isura
square-tailed kite
Pandion cristatus
osprey
Ninox connivens
barking owl
Ninox strenua
powerful owl
Tyto longimembris
grass owl
Tyto novaehollandiae
masked owl
Tyto tenebricosa tenebricosa
sooty owl
Actitis hypoleucos
common sandpiper
Calidris acuminata
sharp-tailed sandpiper
Calidris ferruginea
curlew sandpiper
Calidris melanotos
pectoral sandpiper
Limicola falcinellus
broad-billed sandpiper
Ardea modesta
eastern great egret
Ardea ibis
cattle egret
Arenaria interpres
ruddy turnstone
Botaurus poiciloptilus
Australasian bittern
Ixobrychus flavicollis
black bittern
Ixobrychus dubius
little bittern
Calidris alba
sanderling
Calidris canutus
red knot
Calidris tenuirostris
great knot
Calidris ruficollis
red-necked stint
Calidris subminuta
long-toed stint
Calidris acuminata
sharp-tailed sandpiper
Charadrius bicinctus
double-banded plover
Charadrius leschenaultii
greater sand plover
Charadrius mongolus
lesser sand plover
Charadrius veredus
oriental plover
Pluvialis dominica
American golden plover
Pluvialis fulva
Pacific golden plover
Pluvialis squatarola
grey plover
Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus
black-necked stork
Erythrogonys cinctus
red-kneed dotterel
Grus rubicunda
brolga
Haematopus fuliginosus
sooty oystercatcher
Limnodromus semipalmatus
Asian dowitcher
Limosa lapponica
bar-tailed godwit
Limosa limosa
black-tailed godwit
Burhinus grallarius
bush stone-curlew
Numenius madagascariensis
eastern curlew
Numenius minutus
little curlew
Esacus neglectus
beach stone-curlew
Numenius phaeopus
whimbrel
Philomachus pugnax
ruff
Plegadis falcinellus
glossy ibis
Porzana fluminea
Australian spotted crake
Porzana pusilla
Baillon's crake
Porzana tabuensis
spotless crake
Lewinia pectoralis
Lewin's rail
Gallinago hardwickii
Latham's snipe
Rostratula australis
painted snipe
Chlidonias leucopterus
white-winged black tern
Sternula albifrons
little tern
Onychoprion anaethetus
bridled tern
Thalasseus bengalensis
lesser crested tern
Hydroprogne caspia
Caspian tern
Sterna hirundo
common tern
Sterna sumatrana
black-naped tern
Gelochelidon nilotica
gull-billed tern
Tringa brevipes
grey-tailed tattler
Tringa incana
wandering tattler
Tringa nebularia
common greenshank
Tringa glareola
wood sandpiper
Tringa stagnatilis
marsh sandpiper
Xenus cinereus
terek sandpiper
Zoothera lunulata
Bassian thrush
Anas castanea
chestnut teal
Anseranas semipalmata
magpie goose
Nettapus coromandelianus
cotton pygmy-goose
Tadorna radjah
radjah shelduck
Calyptorhynchus banksii
red-tailed black-cockatoo
Calyptorhynchus funereus
yellow-tailed black-cockatoo
Calyptorhynchus lathami
glossy black-cockatoo
Cyclopsitta diophthalma coxeni
Coxen's fig-parrot
Lathamus discolor
swift parrot
Pezoporus wallicus wallicus
ground parrot
Acanthiza lineata
striated thornbill
Acanthiza reguloides
buff-rumped thornbill
Ailuroedus crassirostris
green catbird
Amaurornis moluccana
pale-vented bush-hen
Apus pacificus
fork-tailed swift
Chthonicola sagittata
speckled warbler
Cinclosoma punctatum
spotted quail-thrush
Excalfactoria chinensis
king quail
Turnix maculosus
red-backed button-quail
Turnix melanogaster
black-breasted button-quail
Turnix velox
little button-quail
Orthonyx temminckii
logrunner
Pitta versicolor
noisy pitta
Climacteris erythrops
red-browed treecreeper
Cormobates leucophaea
white-throated treecreeper
Coracina lineata
barred cuckoo-shrike
Cuculus optatus
oriental cuckoo
Daphoenositta chrysoptera
varied sittella
Eurostopodus mystacalis
white-throated nightjar
Falcunculus frontatus
crested shrike-tit
Gerygone mouki
brown gerygone
Hirundapus caudacutus
white-throated needle-tail
Lichenostomus melanops
yellow-tufted honeyeater
Melithreptus gularis
black-chinned honeyeater
Phylidonyris niger
white-cheeked honeyeater
Lopholaimus antarcticus
topknot pigeon
Ptilinopus magnificus
wompoo fruit-dove
Ptilinopus regina
rose-crowned fruit-dove
Ptilinopus superbus
superb fruit-dove
Merops ornatus
rainbow bee-eater
Menura alberti
Albert’s lyrebird
Microeca fascinans
jacky winter
Carterornis leucotis
white-eared monarch
Monarcha melanopsis
black-faced monarch
Symposiarchus trivirgatus
spectacled monarch
Myiagra alecto
shining flycatcher
Myiagra cyanoleuca
satin flycatcher
Podargus ocellatus plumiferus
plumed frogmouth
Pomatostomus temporalis
grey-crowned babbler
Ptiloris paradiseus
paradise riflebird
Sericornis citreogularis
yellow-throated scrubwren
Sericornis magnirostra
large-billed scrubwren
Sericulus chrysocephalus
regent bowerbird
Smicrornis brevirostris
weebill
Struthidea cinerea
apostlebird
Tregellasia capito
pale-yellow robin
Hirundo rustica
barn swallow
Mammalia (mammals)
Phascolarctos cinereus
koala
Tachyglossus aculeatus
short-beaked echidna
Ornithorhynchus anatinus
platypus
Dasyurus maculatus maculatus
spotted-tailed quoll (southern subspecies)
Austronomus australis
white-striped freetail bat
Chalinolobus dwyeri
large-eared pied bat
Chalinolobus picatus
little pied bat
Kerivoula papuensis
golden-tipped bat
Miniopterus australis
little bent-wing bat
Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis
eastern bent-wing bat
Mormopterus norfolkensis
east coast freetail bat
Nyctimene robinsoni
eastern tube-nosed bat
Nyctophilus gouldi
Gould's long-eared bat
Nyctophilus corbeni
eastern long-eared bat
Rhinolophus megaphyllus
eastern horseshoe-bat
Saccolaimus flaviventris
yellow-bellied sheathtail bat
Scoteanax rueppellii
greater broad-nosed bat
Syconycteris australis
eastern blossom bat
Vespadelus pumilus
eastern forest bat
Falsistrellus tasmaniensis
eastern false pipistrelle
Myotis macropus
southern myotis
Pteropus alecto
black flying-fox
Pteropus poliocephalus
grey-headed flying-fox
Pteropus scapulatus
little red flying-fox
Trichosurus caninus
short-eared possum
Acrobates pygmaeus
feathertail glider
Petaurus australis australis
yellow-bellied glider (southern subspecies)
Petaurus breviceps
sugar glider
Petaurus norfolcensis
squirrel glider
Petauroides volans
greater glider
Phascogale tapoatafa
brush-tailed phascogale
Antechinus flavipes
yellow-footed antechinus
Antechinus subtropicus
subtropical antechinus
Planigale maculata
common planigale
Macropus dorsalis
black-striped wallaby
Macropus parryi
whiptail wallaby
Wallabia bicolor
swamp wallaby
Macropus giganteus
eastern grey kangaroo
Thylogale stigmatica
red-legged pademelon
Thylogale thetis
red-necked pademelon
Melomys cervinipes
fawn-footed melomys
Aepyprymnus rufescens
rufous bettong
Sminthopsis murina
common dunnart
Perameles nasuta
long-nosed bandicoot
Potorous tridactylus tridactylus
long-nosed potoroo
Pseudomys gracilicaudatus
eastern chestnut mouse
Xeromys myoides
water mouse
Rattus fuscipes
bush rat
Rattus lutreolus
swamp rat
Rattus tunneyi
pale field-rat
Reptilia (reptiles)
Amphibolurus nobbi
no common name
Antaresia maculosa
no common name
Carlia munda
no common name
Carlia schmeltzii
no common name
Acanthophis antarcticus
common death adder
Demansia vestigiata
black whip snake
Hoplocephalus bitorquatus
pale-headed snake
Hoplocephalus stephensii
Stephen’s banded snake
Pseudechis guttatus
spotted black snake
Pseudechis porphyriacus
red-bellied black snake
Tropidechis carinatus
rough-scaled snake
Oxyuranus scutellatus
taipan
Vermicella annulata
bandy-bandy
Chelodina expansa
broad-shelled river turtle
Chelodina longicollis
eastern snake-necked turtle
Ctenotus arcanus
arcane striped skink
Delma plebeia
common delma
Delma torquata
collared delma
Bellatorias major
land mullet
Bellatorias frerei
major skink
Egernia striolata
tree skink
Eroticoscincus graciloides
elf skink
Eulamprus murrayi
Murray's skink
Lampropholis couperi
Couper's skink
Morethia taeniopleura
fire-tailed skink
Ophioscincus ophioscincus
a legless burrowing skink
Oedura sp. cf rhombifera
velvet gecko
Oedura tryoni
southern spotted velvet gecko
Underwoodisaurus milii
thick-tailed gecko
Chlamydosaurus kingii
frilled lizard
Pygopus lepidopodus
common scaly-foot
Varanus gouldii
sand monitor
Varanus varius
lace monitor
Amphibia (amphibians)
Adelotus brevis
tusked frog
Crinia tinnula
wallum froglet
Cyclorana alboguttata
greenstripe frog
Limnodynastes salmini
salmon striped frog
Limnodynastes tasmaniensis
spotted grassfrog
Litoria brevipalmata
green thighed frog
Litoria freycineti
wallum rocketfrog
Litoria olongburensis
wallum sedgefrog
Litoria wilcoxii
stony creek frog
Litoria pearsoniana
cascade treefrog
Litoria tyleri
southern laughing treefrog
Mixophyes fasciolatus
great barred frog
Pseudophryne major
great brown broodfrog
Taudactylus diurnus
southern dayfrog
Uperoleia laevigata
eastern gungan
Uperoleia rugosa
chubby gungan
Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish)
Ambassis agassizii
Agassiz's glassfish
Craterocephalus marjoriae
Marjorie's hardyhead
Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum
fly-specked hardyhead
Glossamia aprion
mouth almighty
Gobiomorphus australis
striped gudgeon
Hypseleotris klunzingeri
western carp gudgeon
Maccullochella sp.
Brisbane river cod
Mogurnda adspersa
purple spotted gudgeon
Nannoperca oxleyana
oxleyan pygmy-perch
Neoceratodus forsteri
Queensland lungfish
Philypnodon grandiceps
flathead gudgeon
Philypnodon macrostomus
dwarf flathead gudgeon
Porochilus rendahli
Rendahl's catfish
Pseudomugil mellis
honey blue eye
Retropinna semoni
Australian smelt
Rhadinocentrus ornatus
soft-spined sunfish
Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish)
Dasyatis fluviorum
estuary stingray
Malacostraca (class of crustaceans)
Euastacus setosus
Mt Glorious spiny crayfish
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